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2003

William Mitchell Law Review

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland Jan 2003

Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland

William Mitchell Law Review

Review of Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy. By Richard A. Posner. Harvard University Press, 2003. 398 Pages. $35.00.


Minnesota And The American Rule: The Recoverability Of Attorneys’ Fees Following In Re Silicone Implant Insurance Coverage Litigation, John M. Bjorkman Jan 2003

Minnesota And The American Rule: The Recoverability Of Attorneys’ Fees Following In Re Silicone Implant Insurance Coverage Litigation, John M. Bjorkman

William Mitchell Law Review

In the United States, a successful litigant is generally not entitled to recover attorneys' fees from the opposing party absent specific statutory or contractual authorization. This basic principle is commonly referred to as the American Rule. Minnesota recognized and adopted the American Rule roughly 125 years ago. A limited number of exceptions to this longstanding rule exist, but Minnesota courts have generally been reluctant to expand or add to these exceptions. In Minnesota, an exception to the American Rule exists for fees incurred in a declaratory action to establish insurance coverage but only if the insurer has breached its duty ...


Civil Procedure—Court Inflexibility Puts Appellant In A Bad Position Regarding Attorney Mistake—In Re Welfare Of J.R., Jr., Douglas L. Pfeifer Jan 2003

Civil Procedure—Court Inflexibility Puts Appellant In A Bad Position Regarding Attorney Mistake—In Re Welfare Of J.R., Jr., Douglas L. Pfeifer

William Mitchell Law Review

Recently, in the case of In re Welfare of J.R., Jr., a proceeding involving the termination of a mother's parental rights, the Minnesota Supreme Court was faced with the issue of whether to affirm a court of appeals order dismissing the mother's appeal for failure to timely serve notice on the child's guardian ad litem, or to excuse the delay under an analysis similar to that required when a party seeks relief from a final judgment or order under Minnesota Rule of Civil Procedure 60.02 (“Rule 60.02”). The appellant argued that in cases involving ...


The Law School Clinic As A Model Ethical Law Office, Peter A. Joy Jan 2003

The Law School Clinic As A Model Ethical Law Office, Peter A. Joy

William Mitchell Law Review

In this essay, I contend that all clinical teachers should explicitly acknowledge that they are legal ethics and professional responsibility teachers and role models of the “good lawyer” in everything they do. I argue that every in-house clinical teacher should strive to make her clinic a model ethical law office.


Aiding The Iraq Debate?, Jeffrey D. Gram Jan 2003

Aiding The Iraq Debate?, Jeffrey D. Gram

William Mitchell Law Review

Review of The War Over Iraq: Saddam's Tyranny and America's Mission. By Lawrence F. Kaplan and William Kristol. Encounter Books, 2003. 125 pages. $25.95.


The Creativity Of The Common-Law Judge: The Jurisprudence Of William Mitchell, Charles J. Reid Jr. Jan 2003

The Creativity Of The Common-Law Judge: The Jurisprudence Of William Mitchell, Charles J. Reid Jr.

William Mitchell Law Review

Mitchell's presence graced the Minnesota Supreme Court for nearly nineteen years, from 1881 to 1900. His output was prodigious. He produced nearly 1600 judicial opinions. It has been estimated “that excluding Sundays, and allowing a month in each year for vacation, Judge Mitchell wrote one opinion in every three days for nineteen years.” Indeed, “[i]n point of numbers, his opinions exceed those of any other justice of the Supreme Court of his state, or the nation.” It is one aspect, perhaps the central aspect, the unifying theme of this prolific body of work, that is the focus of ...


Legal Scholarship For Equal Justice: Summary Of Panel Discussion, Sam Magavern Jan 2003

Legal Scholarship For Equal Justice: Summary Of Panel Discussion, Sam Magavern

William Mitchell Law Review

In 2002, a group of professors, deans, equal justice practitioners, and a Minnesota Supreme Court justice formed a Legal Scholarship for Equal Justice committee (LSEJ) to explore ways to link the work of professors and students to the equal justice issues faced by the bench and bar in our state. Since then, LSEJ has become a formal project of the Minnesota Justice Foundation, a nonprofit group that works at the four Minnesota law schools to integrate public service into the law school experience. So far, LSEJ has created an issues list, a class, and an annual symposium. The issues list ...


Tort Law—The Motorist’S Guide To State Policy: Vehicle Owner Vicarious Liability Following Grants Of Initial Permission—Christensen V. Milbank Insurance Co., Christopher K. Iijima Jan 2003

Tort Law—The Motorist’S Guide To State Policy: Vehicle Owner Vicarious Liability Following Grants Of Initial Permission—Christensen V. Milbank Insurance Co., Christopher K. Iijima

William Mitchell Law Review

This note explores the Christensen decision and its effect on motor vehicle owner liability in Minnesota. First, the note presents a historical perspective from which to view the Christensen decision and Minnesota's motor vehicle liability and conversion laws. Next, the note summarizes the factual and procedural history of the Christensen case. Then the note discusses the Minnesota Supreme Court holding in Christensen. The note goes further to present a policy and legal analysis of the Christensen decision. Further, the note suggests an amendment to allow evenhanded treatment of vehicle owners, while satisfying state policy. The note concludes that the ...


Towards A New Scholarship For Equal Justice, James S. Liebman Jan 2003

Towards A New Scholarship For Equal Justice, James S. Liebman

William Mitchell Law Review

Over the last thirty years, the legal academy has turned a cold shoulder to the subject matter of this symposium: scholarship for equal justice. I am here to suggest that a thaw may be on the way. By scholarship for equal justice--as distinguished from scholarship about that topic--I mean academic work undertaken for the purpose of improving outcomes for individuals and members of groups who have been systematically held back by their race, sex, poverty, or any other basis for rationing success that our legal system treats with suspicion. With reference to some of my own work and that of ...


The Expansion Of Punitive Damages In Minnesota: Environmental Litigation After Jensen V. Walsh , Alexandra B. Klass Jan 2003

The Expansion Of Punitive Damages In Minnesota: Environmental Litigation After Jensen V. Walsh , Alexandra B. Klass

William Mitchell Law Review

This article explains how the law of punitive damages has developed in Minnesota both before and after Jensen, and illustrates the significance of the Jensen case through a detailed discussion of the facts and outcome of the Kennedy Building Associates case. Section II of this article discusses the purpose of punitive damages, the process in Minnesota by which a punitive damages claim may be added to a case, and the circumstances under which punitive damages may be awarded. Section III of this article discusses the role of the courts in reviewing a jury's award of punitive damages in light ...


Foreword, Sam Hanson Jan 2003

Foreword, Sam Hanson

William Mitchell Law Review

Introduction to issue of Recent Decisions of the Minnesota Supreme Court (from 2002-03 term).


Pressure Of The Popular: Presidential Prestige And The High Court, Timothy W. Clark Jan 2003

Pressure Of The Popular: Presidential Prestige And The High Court, Timothy W. Clark

William Mitchell Law Review

Review of Popular Justice: Presidential Prestige and Executive Success in the Supreme Court. By Jeff Yates. State University of New York Press, 2002. 131 pages. $17.95.


Unlawful Discrimination Or A Necessity For A Fair Trial?: Exclusion Of A Law Clerk With A Disability From The Courtroom During Jury Trial Of A Personal Injury Case, Luther A. Granquist Jan 2003

Unlawful Discrimination Or A Necessity For A Fair Trial?: Exclusion Of A Law Clerk With A Disability From The Courtroom During Jury Trial Of A Personal Injury Case, Luther A. Granquist

William Mitchell Law Review

Today, the judicial system, broadly viewed to include bench and bar, jurors, and court personnel, includes more persons of color and more women than ever before. Issues of discrimination on the basis of race and gender continue, but progress has been made. However, few persons with evident disabilities practice law or sit on the bench. Perhaps that is why the very presence of a man with serious disabilities prompts concerns about the effect that he will have, just being there, on the outcome of a case. When more persons with evident disabilities, more persons who use wheelchairs or have personal ...


Criminal Law—The Restraint Of Common Sense, Not Violent Abusers: The Minnesota Supreme Court’S Misguided Analysis In State V. Colvin, Marc M. Schifalacqua Jan 2003

Criminal Law—The Restraint Of Common Sense, Not Violent Abusers: The Minnesota Supreme Court’S Misguided Analysis In State V. Colvin, Marc M. Schifalacqua

William Mitchell Law Review

This case note explores the history of protective orders both around the country and in Minnesota. It analyzes the law of burglary and its recent interaction with OFP violations in Minnesota, and then summarizes the Colvin case's facts, procedural history, and Minnesota Supreme Court decision. Subsequently, this note criticizes the court's decision amid its apparent misapplication of the trial court record and relevant law. Finally, the note analyzes Colorado's approach to the issue of whether an OFP violation can satisfy the predicate crime requirement of burglary.


Lest We Forget: Celebrating Thirty Years Of Clinical Legal Education At William Mitchell College Of Law, Rosalie E. Wahl Jan 2003

Lest We Forget: Celebrating Thirty Years Of Clinical Legal Education At William Mitchell College Of Law, Rosalie E. Wahl

William Mitchell Law Review

Speech given at Reunion of Early Clinic Directors and Participants, March 20, 2003.


Erlandson V. Kiffmeyer: Minnesota’S Absentee Voting Laws Following The Sudden Death Of Incumbent Candidate Paul Wellstone, Elizabeth M. Brama Jan 2003

Erlandson V. Kiffmeyer: Minnesota’S Absentee Voting Laws Following The Sudden Death Of Incumbent Candidate Paul Wellstone, Elizabeth M. Brama

William Mitchell Law Review

This article addresses the legal and practical effects of Senator Wellstone's death and the court's absentee ballot decision in Erlandson v. Kiffmeyer. Part II discusses other, surprisingly common, instances when a candidate has died or withdrawn close to an election, and examines Minnesota's approach to pre-election vacancies. Part III explores the Erlandson decision and the facts giving rise to it. Part IV then analyzes the court's decision and the legislature's reaction to it. Finally, Part V concludes that if the state has an acknowledged goal of enfranchising absentee voters even after an unexpected, catastrophic event ...


The Quicksands Of Originalism: Interpreting Minnesota’S Constitutional Past, Douglas A. Hedin Jan 2003

The Quicksands Of Originalism: Interpreting Minnesota’S Constitutional Past, Douglas A. Hedin

William Mitchell Law Review

There are several varieties of the “originalist” school of constitutional thought, but all subscribe in one degree or another to the belief that a constitutional clause should be interpreted according to its original meaning or the original intent of its authors. That original understanding or intent can be discerned from the text of the clause, the history of its drafting and ratification and, sometimes, early practices and court decisions interpreting that clause. It rightly has been called a “grand theory” because it is simple and clear, explains so much, and it has the almost irresistible attraction of being anchored firmly ...


Property Law—Minnesota’S Lake Shore Property Owners Without Road Access Find Themselves Up A Creek Without A Paddle—In Re Daniel For The Establishment Of A Cartway, Kirstin Kanski Jan 2003

Property Law—Minnesota’S Lake Shore Property Owners Without Road Access Find Themselves Up A Creek Without A Paddle—In Re Daniel For The Establishment Of A Cartway, Kirstin Kanski

William Mitchell Law Review

Minnesotans have always taken pride in the vast rivers and lakes intricately woven throughout the state. This land-water mosaic has always been integral to state development. Yet regardless of how vital Minnesota's lakes are considered to be, the law must keep apace with the dynamic and innovative society it serves. Today, the typical Minnesotan thinks in terms of driving to work, not rowing. The Daniel decision thus renders Minnesota's cartway statute obsolete due to modern modes of transportation. In examining the Daniel decision, this case note begins with the historical development of Minnesota's cartway legislation and an ...


Foreword, Douglas R. Heidenreich Jan 2003

Foreword, Douglas R. Heidenreich

William Mitchell Law Review

Foreward to William Mitchell Law Review volume 30, issue 1: Essay Collection: Thirty Years of Clinical Legal Education at William Mitchell College of Law.


Essay: Recent Developments In Minnesota Dram Shop Law, Christopher E. Celichowski, Michael T. Johnson Jan 2003

Essay: Recent Developments In Minnesota Dram Shop Law, Christopher E. Celichowski, Michael T. Johnson

William Mitchell Law Review

Minnesota's Civil Damages Act is a creature of statute without counterpart in common law. The Act, referred to as the “Dram Shop Act,” is highly penal in nature and is intended to provide remedies for damages attributable to commercial lenders' illegal sale of intoxicating liquors. Since the Act's inception more than ninety-two years ago, Minnesota courts traditionally have construed it in a strict fashion. Over its long evolution, the “duet” of legislative action and court interpretation served to clarify several ambiguities within the Act. Despite precise and oftentimes circumstantial application, certain ambiguities remain. The following article will--in the ...


The Healing Presence Of Clients In Law School, Angela Mccaffrey Jan 2003

The Healing Presence Of Clients In Law School, Angela Mccaffrey

William Mitchell Law Review

William Mitchell College of Law is celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of the Law Clinic. As a beneficiary of clinical legal education at William Mitchell, I write this essay to reflect on the value of clinical legal education to law students, to the clients served, and to the community at large. In my view, clinical legal education is timeless--as valuable to law students today as it was thirty years ago when William Mitchell started its first clinic. Although many things combine to make clinical education valuable, three aspects are particularly noteworthy. First, clinics give law students the chance to represent clients ...


Janssen V. Best & Flanagan: At Long Last, The Beginning Of The End For The Auerbach Approach In Minnesota?, Eric J. Moutz Jan 2003

Janssen V. Best & Flanagan: At Long Last, The Beginning Of The End For The Auerbach Approach In Minnesota?, Eric J. Moutz

William Mitchell Law Review

This May, the Minnesota Supreme Court weighed in on the issue of special litigation committees for the first time in Janssen v. Best & Flanagan. The Janssen decision provides some confusing but tantalizing hints that the Minnesota courts may be ready to increase their scrutiny of internal corporate governance. This article describes the history, substance, and holding of Janssen and explores what it might mean for the business judgment rule in Minnesota. The article concludes by arguing that the Minnesota courts should abandon the deferential approach they have traditionally taken to special litigation committee decisions and that the Janssen decision empowers ...


In Support Of A Unitary Tenure System For Law Faculty: An Essay, Nina W. Tarr Jan 2003

In Support Of A Unitary Tenure System For Law Faculty: An Essay, Nina W. Tarr

William Mitchell Law Review

[L]aw faculties are made up of diverse groups of people who contribute to the academic mission in a variety of ways. Given this, there is no reason to isolate one subset--those who teach in the clinic--and treat them differently when it comes to influence, power, autonomy, access to resources, security, or remuneration. In short, to give them a different “status” has become a historical anachronism.


Contracts—Beating Them At Their Own Game: The Business Risk Doctrine And The Broadening Coverage Of Commercial General Liability Insurance—Thommes V. Milwaukee Insurance Co., Katherine J. Solon Jan 2003

Contracts—Beating Them At Their Own Game: The Business Risk Doctrine And The Broadening Coverage Of Commercial General Liability Insurance—Thommes V. Milwaukee Insurance Co., Katherine J. Solon

William Mitchell Law Review

This note first examines the theory behind the business risk doctrine in analyzing CGL insurance. It then details the supreme court's holding in Thommes, followed by an analysis of that decision. Finally, the note concludes that, whatever problems may exist, the court has devised a manageable approach to CGL insurance coverage.


Out Of The Frying Pan, Into The Fire: The Feasibility Of Post-Dispute Employment Arbitration Agreements, Lewis L. Maltby Jan 2003

Out Of The Frying Pan, Into The Fire: The Feasibility Of Post-Dispute Employment Arbitration Agreements, Lewis L. Maltby

William Mitchell Law Review

Changing the law to enforce only post-dispute agreements to arbitrate will not solve the problems of arbitration as a condition of employment. This change would leave the majority of employees who need arbitration in order to obtain justice empty handed, which is a situation far worse than the one employees face today. Rather than change from one unacceptable option to another, models for voluntary pre-dispute arbitration agreements need to be further developed.


Criminal Law—Scarlet Letters: Traffic Stops Based On “Special” License Plates Must Follow The Letter Of The Constitution—State V. Henning, Piper Kenney Webb, Bruce H. Hanley Jan 2003

Criminal Law—Scarlet Letters: Traffic Stops Based On “Special” License Plates Must Follow The Letter Of The Constitution—State V. Henning, Piper Kenney Webb, Bruce H. Hanley

William Mitchell Law Review

The Minnesota Supreme Court recently addressed whether a Minnesota statute authorizing law enforcement to stop motorists based solely on the presence of special license plates issued primarily to repeat drunken drivers is proper under the United States and Minnesota Constitutions. In State v. Henning, the court held the statute unconstitutional by a 4-3 decision. Finding no persuasive reason to do otherwise, the court struck down the legislature's attempt to eliminate the requirement that law enforcement have “reasonable articulable suspicion” to conduct an investigatory stop of a motor vehicle. This article provides a brief survey of similar laws in other ...


Illegitimate Children’S Rights In Probate Proceedings—In Re Estate Of James A. Palmer, Deceased, Robert A. Mcleod Jan 2003

Illegitimate Children’S Rights In Probate Proceedings—In Re Estate Of James A. Palmer, Deceased, Robert A. Mcleod

William Mitchell Law Review

The transfer of a person's assets after death has been an important element in the law beginning with the Magna Carta, and is firmly rooted in American jurisprudence. Defining children and heirs for probate purposes remains a difficult issue. In particular, the determination of children and heirs in an age when the birth of “illegitimate” children is common makes the proper and just determination of heirship a recurring and timely topic. The Minnesota Probate Code defines the term “child” and provides: “a person is the child of the person's parents regardless of the marital status of the parents ...


Risks And Rewards Of Law Student Volunteer Service: A Supervisor’S Perspective, Julie E. Bennett, Sharon H. Fischlowitz Jan 2003

Risks And Rewards Of Law Student Volunteer Service: A Supervisor’S Perspective, Julie E. Bennett, Sharon H. Fischlowitz

William Mitchell Law Review

During the 2002 academic year, law students in Minnesota contributed 16,078 pro bono service hours. This level of student pro bono activity is possible only because licensed attorneys take the time to supervise and guide students. Volunteer supervision, a task separate from the practice of law, requires time, patience, and teaching skills, and has no guaranteed outcome. One might conclude that the necessary investment is not worth the effort. However, year after year, supervisors and volunteers continue to give thousands of service hours, providing critical legal services to clients who would otherwise go unrepresented. This essay examines some of ...


Federal Whistleblower Protection: A Means To Enforcing Maximum-Hour Legislation For Medical Residents, Robert Neil Wilkey Jan 2003

Federal Whistleblower Protection: A Means To Enforcing Maximum-Hour Legislation For Medical Residents, Robert Neil Wilkey

William Mitchell Law Review

The extension of whistleblower protection to medical residents is by no means a panacea to current abusive working conditions. Roles exist for the federal government, the states, and institutional organizations such as the ACGME. Whistleblower protection provides one subtle yet effective regulatory tool that could undoubtedly result in enforcement of labor standards and ultimately better working conditions for medical residents.


Juvenile Law Developments—“One Last Chance”: Applying Adult Standards To Extended Jurisdiction Juvenile Proceedings—State V. B.Y., Kathryn A. Santelmann, Kara Rafferty Jan 2003

Juvenile Law Developments—“One Last Chance”: Applying Adult Standards To Extended Jurisdiction Juvenile Proceedings—State V. B.Y., Kathryn A. Santelmann, Kara Rafferty

William Mitchell Law Review

In 1995, Minnesota created a blended sentencing option for serious, violent juvenile offenders. Under this new option, Extended Juvenile Jurisdiction (“EJJ”), the juvenile court retains jurisdiction over the offender until age 21. In EJJ cases the court also imposes an adult sentence, which is stayed on the condition that the offender complies with the conditions of probation. Since the passage of the EJJ statute, the Minnesota Supreme Court has issued a limited number of opinions reviewing EJJ cases. State v. B.Y., issued April 24, 2003, involves an issue of first impression. The B.Y. opinion addresses standards to be ...