Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2000

Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Prisoners

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Thanks, But No Thanks: State Supreme Courts' Attempts To Remove Themselves From The Federal Habeas Exhaustion Requirement, Kirk J. Henderson Jan 2000

Thanks, But No Thanks: State Supreme Courts' Attempts To Remove Themselves From The Federal Habeas Exhaustion Requirement, Kirk J. Henderson

Case Western Reserve Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beneficial And Unusual Punishment: An Argument In Support Of Prisoner Participation In Clinical Trials, Sharona Hoffman Jan 2000

Beneficial And Unusual Punishment: An Argument In Support Of Prisoner Participation In Clinical Trials, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

Currently, approximately 1.8 million people are incarcerated in the United States at any given time. A disproportionately large percentage of the prisoner population has serious illnesses, such as AIDS and tuberculosis. Prisoners most often, however, are barred from participation in clinical trials, even when conventional therapy has failed, and experimental treatment might provide them with their only hope of survival.

Much of the reluctance to include prisoners in biomedical research is based on history. In the past, prisoners have been severely abused and even tortured in medical studies conducted in the Nazi death camps, Japanese prisoner camps, and correctional ...