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2000

Legal History

Activism

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Querying A Queer Spain Under Franco, Peter Kwan Apr 2000

Querying A Queer Spain Under Franco, Peter Kwan

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

There should be more articles in the legal journals such as Professor Gema Pérez-Sánchez's. In Franco's Spain, Queer Nation?, Professor Pérez-Sánchez has done a great service to legal scholarship in four respects. Firstly, she has written an appropriately far-ranging piece. In a discipline that has as one of its central missions the broadening of critical legal discourse, LatCrit can sometimes appear to suffer from symptoms of parochialism in its understandable emphasis on the Latina/o experience within American borders, or on the experience of its Latina/o immigrants once they have reached these shores. To be sure, this ...


Franco's Spain, Queer Nation?, Gema Pérez-Sánchez Apr 2000

Franco's Spain, Queer Nation?, Gema Pérez-Sánchez

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Article discusses how, through its juridical apparatus, the Spanish dictatorship of Francisco Franco sought to define and to contain homosexuality, followed by examples of how underground queer activism contested homophobic laws. The Article concludes by analyzing a literary work to illustrate the social impact of Francoism's homophobic law against homosexuality.


Hegemony, Coercion, And Their Teeth-Gritting Harmony: A Commentary On Power, Culture, And Sexuality In Franco's Spain, Ratna Kapur, Tayyab Mahmud Apr 2000

Hegemony, Coercion, And Their Teeth-Gritting Harmony: A Commentary On Power, Culture, And Sexuality In Franco's Spain, Ratna Kapur, Tayyab Mahmud

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Professor Gema Pérez-Sánchez's article, Franco's Spain, Queer Nation? focuses on the last years of Francisco Franco's fascist dictatorship and the early years of the young Spanish democracy, roughly from the late 1960's to the early 1980's. The centerpiece of her article looks at how, through law, Franco's regime sought to define and contain what it considered dangerous social behavior, particularly homosexuality. She traces how the state not only exercised hegemonic control over definitions of gender and sexuality, but also established well-defined roles for women and drew clear lines between what constituted legitimate and illegitimate ...