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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Battle On The Benches: The Wagner Act And The Federal Circuit Courts Of Appeals, 1935-1942, Douglas J. Feeney-Gallagher Jan 2000

Battle On The Benches: The Wagner Act And The Federal Circuit Courts Of Appeals, 1935-1942, Douglas J. Feeney-Gallagher

Seattle University Law Review

This paper examines the efforts of some circuit court judges to preserve the integrity of the judicial branch against the encroaching power of the New Deal administrative agencies, especially as represented by the National Labord Relations Board (NLRB). This paper offers a historical overview of the relationship between two circuits and the NLRB; one circuit welcomed the Board's aggressive enforcement of the Act, while the other expressed hostility towards the labor agency's powers and interpretation of the Wagner Act. An examination of the NLRB opinions in these two circuits illustrates the opposing judicial attitudes toward the new turn ...


Psychological Consequences Of Adopting A Therapeutic Lawyering Approach: Pitfalls And Protective Strategies, Lynda L. Murdoch Jan 2000

Psychological Consequences Of Adopting A Therapeutic Lawyering Approach: Pitfalls And Protective Strategies, Lynda L. Murdoch

Seattle University Law Review

The integration of preventive law and therapeutic jurisprudence holds promise for enriching the careers of many practicing lawyers. However, the process of becoming more therapeutic in orientation also involves risk. This Article discusses four potential pitfalls: (1) the process of becoming psychologically-minded and its inherent hazards, including overidentification; (2) the difficulty of balancing neutrality and involvement; (3) the need to identify and manage transference and countertransference; and (4) the risk of secondary trauma. Protective strategies, drawn from the psychotherapeutic and burnout literature, are outlined. This Article stresses the need for lawyers to recognize potential hazards and draw on the experience ...


Therapeutic Jurisprudence In The Appellate Arena: Judicial Notice And The Potential Of The Legislative Fact Remand, A.J. Stephani Jan 2000

Therapeutic Jurisprudence In The Appellate Arena: Judicial Notice And The Potential Of The Legislative Fact Remand, A.J. Stephani

Seattle University Law Review

This Article begins with a modest objective and ends with an ambitious one. First, it asserts that appellate courts are an appropriate forum for considering the therapeutic impact of the law strand of therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) scholarship. TJ's character as a "field of social inquiry" is especially suited to the appellate courts' task of formulating new rules of law and choosing among competing policy objectives when resolving opposing normative principles.


Cyberspace And The "Devil's Hatband", Jonathan J. Rusch Jan 2000

Cyberspace And The "Devil's Hatband", Jonathan J. Rusch

Seattle University Law Review

In this Article, I maintain that while there is an ongoing conflict of legal traditions over the desirability of fences in cyberspace, there are definite virtues in the creation of such fences, so long as we understand the physical, psychological, and moral dimensions of that process. Part I will present a brief survey of the history of barbed wire in the Old West, paying particular attention to the contending legal traditions that affected the manner and extent of that growth in the West. These contending legal traditions, which related to "fencing in" versus "fencing out" cattle, played a key role ...


Silencing The Appellant's Voice: The Antitherapeutic Per Curiam Affirmance, Amy D. Ronner, Bruce J. Winick Jan 2000

Silencing The Appellant's Voice: The Antitherapeutic Per Curiam Affirmance, Amy D. Ronner, Bruce J. Winick

Seattle University Law Review

This Article will analyze the antitherapeutic impact of the per curium affirmance (PCA) in two steps. First, delving into the psychology of procedural justice, this Article will explain how litigants value "voice," or the ability to tell their stories, as well as "validation," or the sense that the decisionmaker has heard their words and taken them seriously. Second, this Article, through the use of narrative, will show how a PCA had a negative psychological impact on an actual appellant in a criminal case. The Article will conclude by proposing an alternative to the antitherapeutic PCA.