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Full-Text Articles in Law

Juristic Giants: A Georgia Study In Reputation, R. Perry Sentell Jr. Apr 2000

Juristic Giants: A Georgia Study In Reputation, R. Perry Sentell Jr.

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In 1990, Judge Richard Posner published CARDOZO: A STUDY IN REPUTATION. A deceptively small volume (only 156 pages), the book purported to delineate and dissect the facets of circumstance, achievement, and character accounting for Benjamin Cardozo's reputation for "greatness." Treating such indicia (both tangible and intangible) as Cardozo's "person," "philosophy," "technique," and "contributions," Posner also sought a handle for "measuring the magnitude" of reputation itself. He hit, of course, upon the modern mechanical mainstay of computerization: a finger-tip presentation of the frequency with which Cardozo's name appears in other judicial opinions.


The False Claims Act And The English Eradication Of Qui Tam Legislation, J. Randy Beck Apr 2000

The False Claims Act And The English Eradication Of Qui Tam Legislation, J. Randy Beck

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Congress amended the False Claims Act in 1986 to encourage qui tam enforcement of the statute, which penalizes submission of false claims to the federal government. A qui tam statute authorizes a private citizen "informer" to file suit on behalf of the government for collection of a statutory forfeiture. A successful informer receives a share of the recovery. Qui tam enforcement came from England, where it served for centuries as the principal means of enforcing a wide range of statutes. England moved away from qui tam enforcement in the 1800s and abolished it altogether in 1951. In this Article, Professor ...


Fox Hunting, Pheasant Shooting And Comparative Law, Alan Watson, Khaled Abou El Fadl Jan 2000

Fox Hunting, Pheasant Shooting And Comparative Law, Alan Watson, Khaled Abou El Fadl

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The Roman jurists, ancient rabbis and Muslim jurists were very different people. Above all, the rabbis and Muslim jurists were engaged on a search for law as truth. And the Roman jurists were much more obviously upper-class gentlemen.91 But the similarities are great. All three had a passion for legal interpretation. They delighted in discussing hypothetical cases. They chased after solutions by ways of reasoning devised by themselves. Practical utility, while present, was in the background. At times, to outsiders, their opinions seem outr6, even callous, remote from reality. They have little interest in what actually happens in court ...


Foreward, Symposium: Philosophical Hermeneutics And Critical Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2000

Foreward, Symposium: Philosophical Hermeneutics And Critical Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii

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This Symposium brings the considerable talents of a diverse group of scholars to bear on a pressing problem in legal theory: Whether critical theory is possible after the hermeneutical turn. All too often, this problem is framed to invite an “either-or” response. Either we reject the hermeneutical turn and hew to a traditional account of critique anchored by an unimpeachable standard (whether economic, historical, conceptual, cognitive, or otherwise), or we take the hermeneutical turn by embracing radical historical contingency and fluidity, thereby forsaking the possibility of critique and surrendering to conservative conventionalism or inviting postmodern chaos. This Symposium challenges this ...


The Quest To Reprogram Cultural Software: A Hermeneutical Response To Jack Balkin's Theory Of Ideology And Critique, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2000

The Quest To Reprogram Cultural Software: A Hermeneutical Response To Jack Balkin's Theory Of Ideology And Critique, Francis J. Mootz Iii

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Critical theory has lost the self-assurance that defined the heady days of Marxist economics and Freudian psychoanalysis. In his famous debate with Hans-Georg Gadamer thirty years ago, Jürgen Habermas argued that critical theory was a necessary corrective to the quiescence and conventionalism that followed from Gadamer's hermeneutic perspective. As the 1960s unfolded, the second generation of the Frankfurt School appeared poised to bring sophisticated techniques of social criticism to bear on the emerging postindustrialist system of global capitalism. But the promise of critical theory failed to materialize. Today, Habermas plays the role of the aging lion who refuses to ...


Psychotherapeutic Practice As A Model For Postmodern Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2000

Psychotherapeutic Practice As A Model For Postmodern Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii

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Critical legal theory is in need of reconstruction and rehabilitation. By most accounts, the goal of critical legal theory is to reveal the deep structure of the legal system that remains unrecognized in, and even obscured by, the self-understanding of legal actors. Scholars traditionally moved beyond the superficial level of legal doctrine either by adopting a rationalistic orientation and analyzing legal concepts or by adopting an empiricist orientation and analyzing the economic and sociological features of legal institutions. However, during the past thirty years there has been a tremendous diversification in these critical approaches. For example, the critical legal studies ...