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Full-Text Articles in Law

Trends. Licit And Illicit Human Trafficking: The Ultimate Violation Of Human Rights, Editor Jul 2000

Trends. Licit And Illicit Human Trafficking: The Ultimate Violation Of Human Rights, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article discusses human trafficking for economic reasons and its context.


Globalization Or Global Subordination? Latcrit Links The Global To The Local And The Local To Global, Sylvia R. Lazos Jan 2000

Globalization Or Global Subordination? Latcrit Links The Global To The Local And The Local To Global, Sylvia R. Lazos

Scholarly Works

Professor Lazos introduces the fifth and final cluster of this LatCrit IV Symposium, International Linkages and Domestic Engagement, which includes five important contributions to LatCrit IV's focus on global issues by Professors Timothy Canova, Gil Gott, Tayyab Mahmud, Ediberto Roman, and Chantal Thomas. The introduction below sketches out, by way of illustration only, how some of the work already presented in this symposium cultivates the linkage between local racial formation and global market dynamics. The introduction then explores LatCrit's contribution to the critique of globalism.


A Kinder, Gentler System Or Capitulations? International Law, Structural Adjustment Policies, And The Standard Of Liberal, Globalized Civilization, David P. Fidler Jan 2000

A Kinder, Gentler System Or Capitulations? International Law, Structural Adjustment Policies, And The Standard Of Liberal, Globalized Civilization, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


"Culturing" Survival : Afro-Caribbean Migrant Culture And The Human Rights Of Women Under Globalization, Hope Lewis Dec 1999

"Culturing" Survival : Afro-Caribbean Migrant Culture And The Human Rights Of Women Under Globalization, Hope Lewis

Hope Lewis

These remarks were delivered at the 93rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law (24-27 March 1999, Washington, DC) for a panel on the rule of law vs. cultural authority. The reality for working-class Afro-Caribbean women migrants (called "lionheart gals" by one Caribbean feminist organization) is that both "the rule of law" and "cultural authority" can enhance, or undermine, the protection of fundamental human rights. For lionheart gals, the choice is not between a liberating rule of law and a static, cocoonlike cultural authority. For them, the primary imperative is to use law and culture in a creative ...