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1992

Health Law and Policy

Confidentiality

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Hey Doc, Can You Keep A Secret - An Ohio Physician's Right To Warn Third Parties That They May Be At Risk Of Contracting Hiv, Mark Wiseman Jan 1992

Hey Doc, Can You Keep A Secret - An Ohio Physician's Right To Warn Third Parties That They May Be At Risk Of Contracting Hiv, Mark Wiseman

Journal of Law and Health

This note will seek to determine if granting a physician the right to warn third parties at risk is the appropriate solution to the above scenario and others like it. Part I will supply a background on the virus that causes AIDS. Part II will review possible legal justification for this breach of the confidential doctor/patient relationship. Part III discusses why there is a need to maintain strict confidentiality of AIDS-related information. Finally, Part IV will discuss alternatives to granting physicians the right to warn.


Mandatory Hiv Testing Issues In State Newborn Screening Programs, John M. Naber, David R. Johnson Jan 1992

Mandatory Hiv Testing Issues In State Newborn Screening Programs, John M. Naber, David R. Johnson

Journal of Law and Health

The newborn screening model is fairly straightforward. Typically, before the infant is discharged from the hospital (around 24 to 36 hours of age), heel stick blood is placed on special filter paper, dried, and mailed to the state health department for testing. Medical and laboratory research has led to the discovery that other diseases could also be screened in newborns using these dried blood specimens. Currently, all states and the District of Columbia test all newborns for at least PKU and congenital hypothyroidism. There are generally five criteria to satisfy before a disease is considered appropriate for newborn screening: 1 ...