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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Origins Of Judicial Review, Saikrishna B. Prakash, John C. Yoo Jan 2003

The Origins Of Judicial Review, Saikrishna B. Prakash, John C. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship

Discusses the origins of judicial review in the U.S. Flaws of the assault on judicial review; Discussion of recurring arguments against judicial review; Widespread support for judicial review of state law.


Explaining Corporate Environmental Performance: How Does Regulation Matter, Robert A. Kagan, Neil Gunningham, Dorothy Thornton Jan 2003

Explaining Corporate Environmental Performance: How Does Regulation Matter, Robert A. Kagan, Neil Gunningham, Dorothy Thornton

Faculty Scholarship

How and to what extent does regulation matter in shaping corporate behavior? How important is it compared to other incentives and mechanisms of social control, and how does it interact with those mechanisms? How might we explain variation in corporate responses to law and other external pressures? This article addresses these questions through an study of environmental performance in 14 pulp and paper manufacturing mills in Australia, New Zealand, British Columbia, and the states of Washington and Georgia in the United States. Over the last three decades, we find tightening regulatory requirements and intensifying political pressures have brought about large ...


Why Is There So Little Money In U.S. Politics?, John M. De Figueiredo, Stephen Ansolabehere, James M. Snyder Jr. Jan 2003

Why Is There So Little Money In U.S. Politics?, John M. De Figueiredo, Stephen Ansolabehere, James M. Snyder Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The New Face Of Investment Arbitration: Nafta Chapter 11, William Park Jan 2003

The New Face Of Investment Arbitration: Nafta Chapter 11, William Park

Faculty Scholarship

To protect American investment abroad, the United States traditionally endorsed arbitration as a preferred means to resolve disputes between investors and host countries. Yet a growing awareness of the down-side of arbitration, at least from the perspective of the party seeking the home-town justice of its own courts, has led to media attacks and legislative initiatives intended to hobble neutral international adjudication. This article suggests that assaults on investment arbitration are misguided, and may end up doing more harm than good. On balance, NAFTA arbitration serves as a positive force in the protection of legitimate economic expectations, enhancing the type ...