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Series

United States

Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

Brookings Scholar Lecture Series

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Can America Govern Itself?: Deficits, Debt, And Delay, Ron Haskins Oct 2013

Can America Govern Itself?: Deficits, Debt, And Delay, Ron Haskins

Brookings Scholar Lecture Series

America has now been in the throes of a deficit and debt crisis for nearly a decade. Over the last three years, the federal government has tied itself in knots trying to reach a long-term solution. Any effective solution will involve tax increases and entitlement cuts. But both parties have been unwilling to openly bargain about either the tax increases or spending cuts they are willing to consider as part of a grand bargain. Why are both parties being so intransigent? What are the prospects for a grand bargain and what might it look like? What are the consequences if ...


Immigrant Workers, Human Capital Investment And The Shape Of Immigration Reform, Audrey Singer Feb 2013

Immigrant Workers, Human Capital Investment And The Shape Of Immigration Reform, Audrey Singer

Brookings Scholar Lecture Series

President Obama's speech in Las Vegas last month kicked off Congressional debates on immigration policy. While border security and illegal immigration are still high profile and thorny issues, slow economic growth following the Great Recession has helped to shift the focus to how the United States can change policy to better suit economic needs. Where do immigrants fit into the labor force, how can they fit better, and what is the likely shape of future policy changes?


Nuclear Arms Control: Challenges And Opportunities In 2013, Steven Pifer Oct 2012

Nuclear Arms Control: Challenges And Opportunities In 2013, Steven Pifer

Brookings Scholar Lecture Series

U.S. nuclear arms control policy must address numerous factors, including our strategic relationships with Russia and China, the potential for future nuclear weapons reductions--including non-strategic nuclear weapons, and the offense-defense relationship, given concerns that missile defense developments could in the future affect the nuclear balance. Washington DC must also consider its obligations under the Non-Proliferation Treaty, how to dissuade new countries from joining the nuclear weapons ranks, and what to do about the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, which the United States has signed but not ratified. This presentation will explore challenges and opportunities facing Washington DC in the aftermath ...