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Series

SSRN

Columbia Law School

2004

Communications Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Copyright's Communications Policy, Tim Wu Jan 2004

Copyright's Communications Policy, Tim Wu

Faculty Scholarship

This paper suggest that the main challenges for 21st century copyright are not challenges of authorship policy, but rather new and harder problems for copyright's communications policy. Since its inception copyright has set important baselines upon which publishers and their modern equivalents compete.business. As the pace of technological change accelerates, copyright's role in setting the conditions for competition is quickly becoming more important, even challenging for primacy the significance of copyright's encouragement of authorship.

The study of copyright's communications policy has both a descriptive and a normative payoff. First, it helps us understand both the ...


The Broadband Debate: A User's Guide, Tim Wu Jan 2004

The Broadband Debate: A User's Guide, Tim Wu

Faculty Scholarship

What follows is a basic guide to the policy divisions in the broadband debate that have emerged and some suggested areas of reconciliation. For simplicity sake I divide the argument to a debate between the openists and the deregulationists.

The summary is critical. I fault the openists for being too prone to favor regulation without making clear the connection between ends and means. For example, too few openists have asked the degree to which the structural open access remedies pushed by independent service providers actually promote the openists' vision. Meanwhile, I fault the deregulationists two reasons. First, the deregulationists have ...


The (New?) Right Of Making Available To The Public, Jane C. Ginsburg Jan 2004

The (New?) Right Of Making Available To The Public, Jane C. Ginsburg

Faculty Scholarship

The Berne Convention 1971 Paris Act covered the right of communication to the public incompletely and imperfectly through a tangle of occasionally redundant or self-contradictory provisions on "public performance," "communication to the public," "public communication," "broadcasting," and other forms of transmission. Worse, the scope of rights depended on the nature of the work, with musical and dramatic works receiving the broadest protection, and images the least; literary works, especially those adapted into cinematographic works, lying somewhere in between. The 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaty rationalized and synthesized protection by establishing full coverage of the communication right for all protected works of ...