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Series

SSRN

Columbia Law School

Public Law and Legal Theory

2002

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Illegalized Sexual Dissent: Sexualities And Nationalisms, Katherine M. Franke Jan 2002

Illegalized Sexual Dissent: Sexualities And Nationalisms, Katherine M. Franke

Faculty Scholarship

In this essay, Katherine Franke explores how dissent becomes a different, and in some ways more interesting, phenomenon when the dissenter emerges not from outside the political horizon drawn by the state, but rather from within it, and as an integral part of the state's project of governance. In these cases, the state calls up a set of subjects who are in some fundamental sense positioned to gain state, if not public, disfavor. These subjects are then isolated, excised or otherwise managed in ways that further state interests. Three cases are discussed in which the production of sexual outlaws ...


The Mead Doctrine: Rules And Standards, Meta-Rules And Meta-Standards, Thomas W. Merrill Jan 2002

The Mead Doctrine: Rules And Standards, Meta-Rules And Meta-Standards, Thomas W. Merrill

Faculty Scholarship

In United States v. Mead Corp. the Supreme Court sought to prescribe a test for determining when the Chevron doctrine applies to agency interpretations of law. The Court got off to a good start, announcing that Chevron applies when Congress has delegated authority to an agency to make rules having the force of law, and the agency has adopted an interpretation pursuant to this authority. Unfortunately, the Court was less than clear about when Congress has delegated the required authority, applying a vague standard that incorporates such elements as whether Congress has directed the agency to use relatively formal procedures ...


Thirteen Ways Of Looking At The Law, Bert I. Huang Jan 2002

Thirteen Ways Of Looking At The Law, Bert I. Huang

Faculty Scholarship

In this short essay, I review Judge Richard Posner's book, Frontiers of Legal Theory.