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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Burden Of A Good Idea: Examining The Impact Of Unfunded Federal Regulatory Mandates On Medicare Participating Hospitals, Rachel Juhas Suddarth Jan 2018

The Burden Of A Good Idea: Examining The Impact Of Unfunded Federal Regulatory Mandates On Medicare Participating Hospitals, Rachel Juhas Suddarth

Law Faculty Publications

Health care costs are on the rise. In 1960, the United States spent $9 billion on hospital care. Since then, hospital related spending has grown exponentially. In 2015, the United States spent over $1 trillion on hospital care, with $359.9 billion of those payments coming from the federal Medicare program for the aged and disabled. Researchers have long tried to understand the exact causes of rising health care costs. While many have closely examined the costs associated with population demographics, medical innovation, prescription drug costs, overutilization of services, and fraud or abuse, there is one driving force that does ...


Dual Electricity Federalism Is Dead, But How Dead And What Replaces It?, Joel B. Eisen Jan 2017

Dual Electricity Federalism Is Dead, But How Dead And What Replaces It?, Joel B. Eisen

Law Faculty Publications

The Supreme Court decided three cases in the past year involving the split of jurisdiction between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the states in the energy sector: FERC v. Electric Power Supply Association, Hughes v. Talen Energy Marketing and ONEOK v. Learjet. This Article concludes that these watershed decisions herald a new approach to governing the rapid evolution of the modern electric grid. Discussing the decisions, the analysis demonstrates that they mark the end of “dual federalism” in electricity law that treated federal and state regulators as operating within separate and distinct spheres of authority, and proposes that ...


Publicity Rules For Public Trusts, Allison Anna Tait Jan 2015

Publicity Rules For Public Trusts, Allison Anna Tait

Law Faculty Publications

That museums are public trusts is a truism in academic discourse and industry discussion. What various commentators mean when they speak about museums as public trusts, however, is less clear. This Article untangles and analyzes the various meanings of "'public trust" and how these meanings translate into regulatory systems. I propose that two predominant meanings-the public resource and trust law meanings-jointly constitute the definition of a public trust, and that each meaning has a consequent regulatory framework. These definitional and regulatory frameworks coexist without conflict in most contexts. In the context of deaccessioning,however, they collide.

Deaccessioning-the practice of a ...


Smart Regulation And Federalism For The Smart Grid, Joel B. Eisen Jan 2013

Smart Regulation And Federalism For The Smart Grid, Joel B. Eisen

Law Faculty Publications

This Article examines the “Smart Grid,” a set of concepts, technologies, and operating practices that may transform America’s electric grid as much as the Internet has done, redefining every aspect of electricity generation, distribution, and use. While the Smart Grid’s promise is great, this Article examines numerous key barriers to its development, including early stage resistance, a lack of incentives for consumers, and the adverse impacts of the federal-state tension in energy regulation. Overcoming these barriers requires both new technologies and transformative regulatory change, beginning with the development of a foundation of interoperability standards (rules of the road ...


Can We Regulate Our Way To Energy Efficiency? Product Standards As Climate Policy, Noah M. Sachs Jan 2012

Can We Regulate Our Way To Energy Efficiency? Product Standards As Climate Policy, Noah M. Sachs

Law Faculty Publications

In this Article, I demonstrate that the regulatory strategy for energy efficiency is working. Although information disclosure, financial incentives, and other softer alternatives to regulation play a vital role in reducing energy demand, these should be viewed as complements to efficiency regulation, rather than replacements. The regulatory approach has led to substantial cost and energy savings in the past, it has enjoyed bipartisan political support, and it targets products and behaviors that are difficult to address through other policy tools. Given the politics of climate change in the United States, which make federal carbon taxes or a cap-and-trade system infeasible ...


Revisiting The Regulation Debate: The Effect Of Food Marketing On Childhood Obesity, Nicole E. Negowetti Jan 2009

Revisiting The Regulation Debate: The Effect Of Food Marketing On Childhood Obesity, Nicole E. Negowetti

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


A Legal Framework For Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases, Wendy Collins Perdue Jan 2005

A Legal Framework For Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases, Wendy Collins Perdue

Law Faculty Publications

Cardiovascular diseases are major contributors to death, disability, disparities, and reduced quality of life in the United States. Successful prevention and control of these diseases requires a comprehensive approach applied across multiple public health settings and in all life stages. Individual lifestyle and behavior change, as well as the broader social, environmental, and policy changes that enable healthy lifestyles, are necessary. Legal strategies can be powerful tools in this endeavor. This review presents seven such strategies applicable at the federal, state, and local levels that can be employed by healthcare providers, public health practitioners, legislators, and other policymakers. They include ...


Legal Frameworks For Chronic Disease Prevention, Wendy Collins Perdue Jan 2004

Legal Frameworks For Chronic Disease Prevention, Wendy Collins Perdue

Law Faculty Publications

Law is a tool that can be used to shape both private and government conduct so as to impact public health. There are at least seven different techniques of legal intervention, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. These techniques are: direct regulation through command and coercion; economic incentives to encourage private parties to behave in a particular way; indirect regulation through private enforcement such as tort law; altering the informational environment; directly providing services or infrastructure to the public; government acting as a "model citizen" with respect to its employees and facilities; and, inducing other levels of government to ...