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Series

Regulation

George Washington University Law School

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Law

Behavioral Economics: Implications For Regulatory Behavior, William E. Kovacic, James C. Cooper Jan 2012

Behavioral Economics: Implications For Regulatory Behavior, William E. Kovacic, James C. Cooper

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Behavioral economics (BE) examines the implications for decision-making when actors suffer from biases documented in the psychological literature. This article considers how such biases affect regulatory decisions. The article posits a simple model of a regulator who serves as an agent to a political overseer. The regulator chooses a policy that accounts for the rewards she receives from the political overseer — whose optimal policy is assumed to maximize short-run outputs that garner political support, rather than long-term welfare outcomes — and the weight the regulator puts on the optimal long run policy. Flawed heuristics and myopia are likely to lead regulators ...


Cooperative Legalism And The Non-Americanization Of European Regulatory Styles: The Case Of Data Privacy, Francesca Bignami Jan 2011

Cooperative Legalism And The Non-Americanization Of European Regulatory Styles: The Case Of Data Privacy, Francesca Bignami

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

European countries have experienced massive structural transformations over the past twenty-five years with the privatization of state-owned industries, the liberalization of markets, and the rise of the European Union. According to one prominent line of analysis, these changes have led to the Americanization of European regulatory styles: previously informal and cooperative modes of regulation are becoming adversarial and litigation-driven, as in the American system. This article explores the Americanization hypothesis with a structured comparison of data privacy regulation in four countries (France, Britain, Germany, and Italy) and a review of three other policy areas. It finds that European regulatory systems ...


Addressing Government Failure Through International Financial Law, Steve Charnovitz Jan 2010

Addressing Government Failure Through International Financial Law, Steve Charnovitz

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This article discusses the recent financial crisis and argues that the government’s actions contributed to the collapse as much as market failure did. The article also notes that preventive and cleanup measures need to be instituted and the economy needs to be made more resilient so that it can survive temporary credit crises. These goals can be accomplished by increasing competitiveness, renewing trade liberalization, eliminating subsidies for domestic products, and avoiding demagoguery. Finally, international institutions should play a role in financial regulation; specifically, the international community should some of the WTO and ILO’s techniques. I conclude by noting ...


Addressing Government Failure Through International Financial Law, Steve Charnovitz Jan 2010

Addressing Government Failure Through International Financial Law, Steve Charnovitz

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This article discusses the recent financial crisis and argues that the government’s actions contributed to the collapse as much as market failure did. The article also notes that preventive and cleanup measures need to be instituted and the economy needs to be made more resilient so that it can survive temporary credit crises. These goals can be accomplished by increasing competitiveness, renewing trade liberalization, eliminating subsidies for domestic products, and avoiding demagoguery. Finally, international institutions should play a role in financial regulation; specifically, the international community should some of the WTO and ILO’s techniques. I conclude by noting ...


The Mysterious Ways Of Mutual Funds: Market Timing, Lawrence A. Cunningham, Tamar Frankel Jan 2006

The Mysterious Ways Of Mutual Funds: Market Timing, Lawrence A. Cunningham, Tamar Frankel

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

The term market timing was little known outside the arcane world of mutual funds until state attorneys general from across the country popularized it. The term's innocuous-sounding ring assumed a more pernicious note when the mysterious ways of mutual funds became more transparent. In its pernicious sense, market timing denominates mutual fund insiders using the inscrutable structures of mutual funds to provide benefits selectively to favored participants at the expense of less favored participants. Mutual fund shares are not like common stocks; investments made using these vehicles are unlike those made through traditional securities markets. While the peculiar features ...


A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection, Daniel J. Solove Jan 2006

A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection, Daniel J. Solove

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

A series of major security breaches at companies with sensitive personal information has sparked significant attention to the problems with privacy protection in the United States. Currently, the privacy protections in the United States are riddled with gaps and weak spots. Although most industrialized nations have comprehensive data protection laws, the United States has maintained a sectoral approach where certain industries are covered and others are not. In particular, emerging companies known as "commercial data brokers" have frequently slipped through the cracks of U.S. privacy law. In this article, the authors propose a Model Privacy Regime to address the ...


Private Standards In Public Law: Copyright, Lawmaking And The Case Of Accounting, Lawrence A. Cunningham Jan 2005

Private Standards In Public Law: Copyright, Lawmaking And The Case Of Accounting, Lawrence A. Cunningham

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Government increasingly leverages its regulatory function by embodying in law standards that are promulgated and copyrighted by non-governmental organizations. Departures from such standards expose citizens to criminal, civil and administrative sanctions, yet private actors generate, control and limit access to them. Despite governmental ambitions, no one is responsible for evaluating the legitimacy of this approach and no framework exists to facilitate analysis. This Article contributes an analytical framework and, for the federal government, nominates the Director of the Federal Register to implement it.

Analysis is animated using among the oldest and broadest examples of this pervasive but stealthy phenomenon: embodiment ...


A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection (Version 2.0), Daniel J. Solove, Chris Jay Hoofnagle Jan 2005

A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection (Version 2.0), Daniel J. Solove, Chris Jay Hoofnagle

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This version incorporates and responds to the many comments that we received to Version 1.1, which we released on March 10, 2005.

Privacy protection in the United States has often been criticized, but critics have too infrequently suggested specific proposals for reform. Recently, there has been significant legislative interest at both the federal and state levels in addressing the privacy of personal information. This was sparked when ChoicePoint, one of the largest data brokers in the United States with records on almost every adult American citizen, sold data on about 145,000 people to fraudulent businesses set up by ...


A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection (Version 1.1), Daniel J. Solove, Chris Jay Hoofnagle Jan 2005

A Model Regime Of Privacy Protection (Version 1.1), Daniel J. Solove, Chris Jay Hoofnagle

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Privacy protection in the United States has often been criticized, but critics have too infrequently suggested specific proposals for reform. Recently, there has been significant legislative interest at both the federal and state levels in addressing the privacy of personal information. This was sparked when ChoicePoint, one of the largest data brokers in the United States with records on almost every adult American citizen, sold data on about 145,000 people to fraudulent businesses set up by identity thieves.

In the aftermath of the ChoicePoint debacle, both of us have been asked by Congressional legislative staffers, state legislative policymakers, journalists ...


The Appeal And Limits Of Internal Controls To Fight Fraud, Terrorism, Other Ills, Lawrence A. Cunningham Jan 2004

The Appeal And Limits Of Internal Controls To Fight Fraud, Terrorism, Other Ills, Lawrence A. Cunningham

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Congress responded in similar ways to 2001's major national crises: bolstering internal controls in corporate America under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in response to Enron's debacle and imposing internal controls on its financial services industry under the USA PATRIOT Act in response to 9/11's terrorism. These reflexive legislative responses to national crisis fit a pattern of proliferating controls as a first-order policy option dating to the mid-1970s. Documenting this proliferation and untangling the definition of internal controls, this Article attributes the appeal of internal controls as a policy option to systemic forces including the movements for deregulation ...


The Sarbanes-Oxley Yawn: Heavy Rhetoric, Light Reform (And It Might Just Work), Lawrence A. Cunningham Jan 2003

The Sarbanes-Oxley Yawn: Heavy Rhetoric, Light Reform (And It Might Just Work), Lawrence A. Cunningham

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

A thorough examination of the much ballyhooed Sarbanes-Oxley Act reveals dominantly a federal codification of extant rules, regulations, practices, and norms. Despite advertising it as "the most far-reaching reforms of American business practices since the time of FDR," a soberly apolitical view sees the Act as more sweep than reform. Important are provisions calling for nine studies; redundant but much publicized were the certification requirements imposed during the summer of 2002; other moves are mere patchwork responses to precise transgressions present in the popularized scandals. The Act is far from trivial, however. A silver bullet relates to the structure and ...


Toward A Jurisprudence Of Cost-Benefit Analysis, Michael B. Abramowicz Jan 2002

Toward A Jurisprudence Of Cost-Benefit Analysis, Michael B. Abramowicz

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

In his book, The Cost-Benefit State, democratic theorist Cass Sunstein urges regulatory agencies to make decisions based on numerical assessments of regulatory consequences, factoring in variables ranging from effects on consumer prices to lives saved. In this Review, I seek to illustrate Sunstein's conception of cost-benefit analysis and critique this conception by suggesting that cost-benefit analysis could serve a more important role than Sunstein would allow. I also argue for a more active judicial role in scrutinizing agency actions than Sunstein would recommend, though not necessarily a less deferential one. In Part I of this review, I outline Sunstein ...