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Full-Text Articles in Law

Self-Reflection Within The Academy: The Absence Of Women In Constitutional Jurisprudence, Karin M. Mika Jul 1998

Self-Reflection Within The Academy: The Absence Of Women In Constitutional Jurisprudence, Karin M. Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This article will suggest that legal education has failed to represent the significant contributions of women in our American legal heritage within its curriculum. It urges that an acknowledgment of the feminine contribution must now be included within the curriculum of law schools in such a way that the contribution is incorporated within traditional substantive courses rather than select courses dealing with primarily "women's issues." Focusing on the Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries, this article highlights the achievements and legal battles of women which were integral to the overall development of legal theory in our country. It discusses some ...


Essays On Legal Education In Nineteenth Century Virginia, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1998

Essays On Legal Education In Nineteenth Century Virginia, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

The following essays are reprinted from unique exemplars with permission: J. T. Lomax, Circular (1831), and B .. ·G. Baldwin, Introductory Lecture (1831), in the Alderman Library of the University of Virginia; L. P. Thompson, Introductory Lecture (1839), in the Library of Virginia; and J. W. Brockenbrough, Introductory Lecture (1858), in the Library at Washington and Lee University. The letters, which are printed here for the first time, were kindly supplied by E. Lee Shepard. They are published here with the kind permissions of the Library of Virginia, the University of Virginia Library, and the Virginia Historical Society. The portraits that ...


Playing Beyond The Rules: A Realist And Rhetoric-Based Approach To Researching The Law And Solving Legal Problems, Thomas Michael Mcdonnell Jan 1998

Playing Beyond The Rules: A Realist And Rhetoric-Based Approach To Researching The Law And Solving Legal Problems, Thomas Michael Mcdonnell

Pace Law Faculty Publications

The proposed realist and rhetorical approach to legal research applies to every conceivable legal problem and provides the student a conceptual foundation not only for solving any legal dispute, but for successfully completing any transactions with which he or she will be confronted. Part I of this article will demonstrate why law students should learn to research the relevant audiences in the legal drama and to research the unpublished and often unwritten rules and practices that these audiences follow. Part II will show how. Part III will present a comprehensive legal problem solving model that integrates these new dimensions of ...


Creating Effective Legal Research Exercises, Amy E. Sloan Jan 1998

Creating Effective Legal Research Exercises, Amy E. Sloan

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


And Then There Was One, Douglas R. Heidenreich Jan 1998

And Then There Was One, Douglas R. Heidenreich

Faculty Scholarship

In the twentieth century's second decade, Minneapolis lawyers created four night law schools, all of which William Mitchell College of Law numbers among its predecessor institutions. By 1940, a single law school remained, an amalgam of the original four. It would unite in 1956 with its St. Paul counterpart to form William Mitchell College of Law.


Teaching Upperclass Writing: Everything You Always Wanted To Know But Were Afraid To Ask, Lissa Griffin Jan 1998

Teaching Upperclass Writing: Everything You Always Wanted To Know But Were Afraid To Ask, Lissa Griffin

Pace Law Faculty Publications

A survey conducted as part of this project reveals that law schools generally require their students to have an upperclass writing experience taught or supervised by non-writing tenured or tenure-track faculty. These teachers currently bear the responsibility for assigning, supervising, reviewing, and evaluating most of the writing by upperclass students, either through substantive seminars or independent study projects. In almost all schools there is no major curricular planning, systematic instruction, faculty training, or institutional support for upperclass writing.


Continuing Classroom Conversation Beyond The Four Whys, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Bailey Kuklin Jan 1998

Continuing Classroom Conversation Beyond The Four Whys, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Bailey Kuklin

Scholarly Works

LAW school classes regularly prove Santayana's aphorism. Although nearly every law teacher desires to keep discussion focused and forward-moving, there are more than a few moments of thundering silence experienced in the classroom. Most of us adjust to this inevitability by positing some pedagogical virtue to still air and contenting ourselves with the knowledge that conversation-stopping “whys?” are usually delivered by us as teachers rather than the students. Perhaps we are underappreciative of the value discomfitting silence has, but we generally prefer that the conversation continue, that we miss the opportunity to feel simultaneously smug and uncomfortable, and that ...