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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Rebellious Lawyering, Regnant Lawyering, And Street-Level Bureaucracy, Paul R. Tremblay Apr 1992

Rebellious Lawyering, Regnant Lawyering, And Street-Level Bureaucracy, Paul R. Tremblay

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article explores the professional responsibilities of progressive lawyers representing the poor and disadvantaged. The author argues that lawyers representing the poor are generally good, energetic lawyers committed to social justice and lessening the pain of poverty. Subsequently, the defects found in poverty lawyering are structural, institutional, political, economic, and ethical. Therefore, the author posits that the mission of teachers and practitioners should be to develop practice patterns and proposals that account for the street-level experiences of legal services lawyers on the front lines. By examining the notions of rebellious and regnant lawyering, the author seeks to illuminate how these ...


A Law & Economics Perspective On A "Traditional" Torts Case: Insights For Classroom And Courtroom, Robert H. Lande Apr 1992

A Law & Economics Perspective On A "Traditional" Torts Case: Insights For Classroom And Courtroom, Robert H. Lande

All Faculty Scholarship

This article is from a symposium, "Five Approaches to Legal Reasoning in the Classroom: Contrasting Perspectives on O'Brien v. Cunard S.S. Co. Ltd.," 57 Missouri L. Rev. 345 (1992). The symposium contains five articles that analyze this case from, respectively, traditionalist, Law & Economics, Critical Legal Studies, Feminist, and Critical Race Theories perspectives.

This article analyzes the O'Brien case from a Law & Economics perspective. It does so in a manner suitable for presentation in a Torts class or a Law & Economics class. It explains the basic terminology and approach. It analyzes the economics underlying the vaccination requirement, whether ...


The Faces Of Law In Theory And Practice: Doctrine, Rhetoric, And Social Context, Richard C. Boldt, Marc Feldman Jan 1992

The Faces Of Law In Theory And Practice: Doctrine, Rhetoric, And Social Context, Richard C. Boldt, Marc Feldman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Writing For Judges, Pierre Schlag Jan 1992

Writing For Judges, Pierre Schlag

Articles

No abstract provided.


Teaching Appellate Advocacy In An Appellate Clinical Law Program, J Thomas Sullivan Jan 1992

Teaching Appellate Advocacy In An Appellate Clinical Law Program, J Thomas Sullivan

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Teaching Morality, Robert A. Solomon Jan 1992

Teaching Morality, Robert A. Solomon

Faculty Scholarship Series

Several years ago in Connecticut, during a criminal trial, the judge looked
down from the bench and saw the defendant standing there alone. The judge
asked, "Do you have counsel?" The defendant looked up at the judge and said,
"Allah is my counsel," to which the judge responded, "I mean local counsel."
Those of you who know me will say "he will do anything for a cheap joke,"
which is true. But this joke is a lot like legal education. In trying to teach law
students, we law faculty are much like the defendant. We have our religion and
our ...


The Legal Profession, Legal Education, And Change, Robert H. Jerry Ii Jan 1992

The Legal Profession, Legal Education, And Change, Robert H. Jerry Ii

Faculty Publications

The accounts of how the legal profession has changed in recent years are as abundant as the changes themselves. The common message is clear: the magnitude of change is immense, and the pace is unprecedented.


Mandatory Prelicensure Legal Internship: An Idea Whose Time Has Come Again, Stephen R. Alton Jan 1992

Mandatory Prelicensure Legal Internship: An Idea Whose Time Has Come Again, Stephen R. Alton

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the wisdom of imposing an internship requirement on aspiring lawyers as a prerequisite for licensure. It is my position that such a requirement can be beneficial to the new attorney, to the profession, and to the public and should thus be mandated for all those who seek admission to the practice of law. This Article begins by briefly examining the history in the United States of law-office, apprenticeship as a means of legal education. I then proceed to an examination of modern internship requirements in England and Canada. There follows a discussion of some of the more ...


Book Review. Teaching Conflicts, Improving The Odds, Gene R. Shreve Jan 1992

Book Review. Teaching Conflicts, Improving The Odds, Gene R. Shreve

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Justice Mission Of American Law Schools, David R. Barnhizer Jan 1992

The Justice Mission Of American Law Schools, David R. Barnhizer

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The scholar's dilemma, particularly those scholars in disciplines such as law that are irreversibly linked to the operation of power and implicit willingness to do violence if necessary, is that societies require shared consensus far more than truth. Negative truths about the scientifically unsupportable premises of our fundamental beliefs might interfere with the quality of the operating consensus, at least for those satisfied with their lot. The stark truth about opportunity, fairness, racial and gender bias, about who receives economic benefits and so forth would not be knowledge that “sets us free” but “sets us at each other's ...


Coping With A Turbulent Environment: Development Of Law Firm Training Programs, Edwin H. Greenebaum Jan 1992

Coping With A Turbulent Environment: Development Of Law Firm Training Programs, Edwin H. Greenebaum

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Simulated Legal Education: A Template, Thomas A. Robinson Jan 1992

Simulated Legal Education: A Template, Thomas A. Robinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Advice For The New Law Professor: A View From The Trenches, Susan J. Becker Jan 1992

Advice For The New Law Professor: A View From The Trenches, Susan J. Becker

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

A decade ago, Professor Douglas Whaley published an essay that offers comfort and advice to those commencing the metamorphosis from practitioners, judicial clerks, and students into professors of law. The purpose of this article is twofold: to offer a confirmation from the trenches of many of Professor Whaley's observations and to supplement his suggestions with some of my own.