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Full-Text Articles in Law

Improving The Law School Classroom And Experience Through Prayer: An Empirical Study, David A. Grenardo Jan 2015

Improving The Law School Classroom And Experience Through Prayer: An Empirical Study, David A. Grenardo

Faculty Articles

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, “To be a Christian without prayer is no more possible than to be alive without breathing.” There are approximately fifty religiously affiliated law schools in the United States. As faith-based communities, these law schools can integrate their faiths into the education they provide by, among other things, incorporating in the classroom a central characteristic of most religions – prayer.

This article includes anonymous survey responses from students at four different Catholic law schools across the nation concerning whether the students liked the fact that their professors prayed at the beginning of class. The article ...


The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession In Crisis, By Stephen J. Harper (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 2013

The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession In Crisis, By Stephen J. Harper (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Stephen J. Harper’s The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession in Crisis, is the latest iteration of the “institutional failure” or “business disaster” story. A number of such books were published around 1990, and have been quite popular since then, for businesses (such as Enron and Tyco) keep failing in such spectacular fashion. The Great Recession that began in December 2007 led to another round of business disaster books, and like their forebears these books make a hard sell for the claim that the disaster was of a titanic nature. And where the business disaster book is found, the legal disaster ...


Legal Obstacles To Bringing The Twenty-First Century In The Classroom: Stop Being Creative, You May Already Be In Trouble, Andre Hampton Jan 2003

Legal Obstacles To Bringing The Twenty-First Century In The Classroom: Stop Being Creative, You May Already Be In Trouble, Andre Hampton

Faculty Articles

There are unimaginable benefits available if legal educators can bring the law classroom into the twenty-first century through the use of popular media and celebrities in their teaching. With the introduction of “pop culture,” the professor can permanently alter the student's view of the course material. Bringing pop culture into the classroom will make the course material more relevant to our students’ lives outside the classroom. This will enhance both their willingness and their ability to master legal concepts.

There are two major obstacles to bringing pop culture into the classroom. The initial major obstacle is the Copyright Act ...


Observations On The Evolution Of Minorities In The Law: From Law School To Practice, Charles E. Cantú Jan 2002

Observations On The Evolution Of Minorities In The Law: From Law School To Practice, Charles E. Cantú

Faculty Articles

The St. Mary’s University School of Law has a rich history in promoting the representation of minorities in its faculty and student body. Moreover, its history in this area was a tradition long before the country found its social conscience, and before the American government, prodded by the civil rights movement, urged institutions of higher learning to engage in affirmative action. St. Mary’s and Hispanics led the way in this national movement. This year, as St. Mary’s University School of Law celebrates its seventy-fifth year, it is a perfect time to reflect upon the evolution of minorities ...


One View To Add To The Many, Bill Piatt Jan 2002

One View To Add To The Many, Bill Piatt

Faculty Articles

The United States offers its citizens the opportunity to participate in the legal and political system through which it governs. The Constitution ensures that its citizens may engage, participate, and represent the body politics in government and the application of its laws. The recent attacks on America and the failure of the immigration system in monitoring its applicants has resulted in more restrictive immigration laws and policy.

The country’s legal education system must continue to improve its efforts in diversifying the nation’s law schools. More minorities should be represented as students, professors, and deans. Accomplishing a more diversified ...


Professor Steele’S Opus, Gerald S. Reamey Jan 1999

Professor Steele’S Opus, Gerald S. Reamey

Faculty Articles

Walter Steele is a consummate teacher precisely because he always is teaching. To observe him, to converse with him, to listen to him, to read him, is to learn something. He would not talk about ethical behavior in the classroom, only to cut corners in his private life. He would not demand razor-sharp logic from his students, and then allow himself to be sloppy in his own thinking.

Over the years, the word former students seem to use most often to describe Professor Steele is “intimidating.” He is intimidating because of his power; not the power some law professors wield ...


The Daishonin’S Path: Applying Nichiren’S Buddhist Principles To American Legal Education, John W. Teeter Jr Jan 1999

The Daishonin’S Path: Applying Nichiren’S Buddhist Principles To American Legal Education, John W. Teeter Jr

Faculty Articles

The fundamental aspects of Nichiren Daishonin's teachings merit modern attention. The Daishonin was a tireless mentor for his disciples, and his call for compassion, critique, courage, and wisdom are essential for law students and teachers alike. A remarkable man, the Daishonin's perceptions ought to inform the way professors teach and advise their students, and encourage others to reflect on their own sources of spiritual sustenance and examine the contributions they can make toward deepening the relevance, meaning, and joy of legal education.

The Daishonin emphasized the primacy of The Lotus Sutra, which declares that all living beings inherently ...


Casebooks, Commentaries, And Curmudgeons: An Introductory History Of Law In The Lecture Hall, Stephen M. Sheppard Jan 1997

Casebooks, Commentaries, And Curmudgeons: An Introductory History Of Law In The Lecture Hall, Stephen M. Sheppard

Faculty Articles

While the methods of instructing American law students have changed over the course of two-hundred years, the primary purpose of American law schools has stayed the same: providing the necessary education for enabling students to effectively practice law. Additionally, legal education should achieve three goals: to provide students a way to learn, organize, and apply the law. Forms of legal education take various forms, each having advocates and opponents. Casebooks—often accompanied by the Socratic method—provide an effective way for students to learn the law through historical rules and decisions, while treatises add organization to a body of law ...


A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1995

A Short History Of Hearsay Reform, With Particular Reference To Hoffman V. Palmer, Eddie Morgan And Jerry Frank, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Much of the history of the American law of evidence, including its most contentious issue, hearsay, is the story of stasis and reform. The case of Hoffman v. Palmer represents one of few cases concerning hearsay known by name, and illustrates that “false” evidence has often been used to caution against efforts proclaiming “radical reform” of the law of evidence.

In this case involving a collision between a car and a train, the critical question was: Is the defendant railroad permitted to introduce into evidence the transcript of a question and answer session made two days after the accident between ...


Teaching Transformative Jurisprudence (Film Review), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 1991

Teaching Transformative Jurisprudence (Film Review), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

The Road to Brown is a film that deals with the transformative judicial ruling of Brown v. Board of Education. Many regard this case as the most important holding ever made by a United States court. The Road to Brown offers law professors a superb vehicle for bringing to the classroom the attention to persons, sense of history, and focus on litigation strategy that a great decision demands.

The Road to Brown provides a rich socio-legal-historical perspective on the events that culminated in the 1945 Supreme Court ruling barring racial segregation in public elementary schools. The program blends together photographs ...


Dutiful Justice (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 1991

Dutiful Justice (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Sheldon Novick’s biography, Honorable Justice: The Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes, is a traditional biography of one of the most important public figures in the United States since the Civil War.

Although the author disclaims it, Honorable Justice is a defense of Holmes. Novick writes of some of Holmes’ faults, but too often Holmes’ human imperfections are defended as strengths. It appears that Novick was trying hard to defend Holmes from late twentieth century critiques. This defense of Holmes seems a misguided attempt to re(de)ify Holmes to a group of readers which will likely include a large ...


Celluloid Legal Ethics: Discipline Redux (Video Review), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 1990

Celluloid Legal Ethics: Discipline Redux (Video Review), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

A recent addition to the field of video legal ethics is The Rest of the Story: Interviews with Two Disciplined Attorneys. Produced by Gerald Sternberg and Dyann Hafner, the film focuses on two attorneys who have been through the disciplinary process, covering how these attorneys got into trouble, what the disciplinary authorities did, and what advice the attorneys would give to other lawyers.

As an exercise in legal ethics “storytelling,” The Rest of the Story is a partial success. The second attorney on the film—who was disciplined for alcohol-related neglect of post-conviction criminal representation—is animated, engaging, and believable ...


Law-Givers, Story-Tellers, And Dubin’S Legal Heroes: The Emerging Dichotomy In Legal Ethics (Video Review), Vincent R. Johnson Jan 1989

Law-Givers, Story-Tellers, And Dubin’S Legal Heroes: The Emerging Dichotomy In Legal Ethics (Video Review), Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

Two camps have begun to emerge from the rich ferment in legal ethics teaching and scholarship over the last twenty years. The first group, whose members might be termed “law-givers,” consists of those who view legal ethics as chiefly concerned with the identification, transmission, and enforcement of uniform standards governing the conduct of lawyers. The second group—considerably smaller, but increasingly well-defined—might be called the “story-tellers.” The story-tellers place a higher value on persons and context than on principles and procedures, and on the cultivation of a deeper, less mechanical sense of professionalism than detailed rules can provide.

Larry ...


The Politics Of Law (Teaching) (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens Jan 1988

The Politics Of Law (Teaching) (Book Review), Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

The satiric novel, as a “message” novel, can provide unvarnished truths about the object of satire. Institutions of higher learning, particularly law schools, and the denizens of those institutions, are prime subjects for satire because they take themselves so seriously. Unfortunately, though, The Socratic Method by Michael Levin takes itself as seriously as the law school it is criticizing.

One of the hazards of the satiric novel is that the message may overwhelm the plot and characterization. Levin, in his zeal to awaken the reader to the torture of the law school, and particularly the torture of the law school ...


Audiovisual Enhancement Of Classroom Teaching: A Primer For Law Professors, Vincent R. Johnson Jan 1987

Audiovisual Enhancement Of Classroom Teaching: A Primer For Law Professors, Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

It is increasingly hard to avoid the idea that audiovisual techniques are appropriate—if not essential—to the contemporary law school classroom. Audiovisual aids are already widely employed in the practice of law, continuing legal education, and in most fields of higher and professional education. Yet, what little empirical evidence exists suggests that modern media techniques have had little impact on the traditional law school classroom. Thus it is relevant to ask whether and how audiovisual media can effectively augment the teaching of standard substantive law courses.