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Full-Text Articles in Law

Assessing The Transformation Of Europe: A View From Political Science, Alec Stone Sweet, Daniel R. Kelemen Jan 2013

Assessing The Transformation Of Europe: A View From Political Science, Alec Stone Sweet, Daniel R. Kelemen

Faculty Scholarship Series

No abstract provided.


Twombly In Context: Why Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 4(B) Is Unconstitutional, E. Donald Elliott Dec 2010

Twombly In Context: Why Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 4(B) Is Unconstitutional, E. Donald Elliott

Faculty Scholarship Series

Rule 4(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure delegates to private parties state authority to compel a person to appear and answer civil charges in court without any preliminary state review or screening for reasonableness. This is argued to be unconstitutional as a unreasonable seizure of the person, a deprivation of private property without due process, and a standardless delegation of state power to a private party with a financial interest.

The history of the writ of summons is reviewed. From the Founding until 1938, federal courts reviewed the grounds proposed for suit prior to service of a ...


Commerce, Jack M. Balkin Feb 2010

Commerce, Jack M. Balkin

Faculty Scholarship Series

This article applies the method of text and principle to an important problem in constitutional interpretation: the constitutional legitimacy of the modern regulatory state and its expansive definition of federal commerce power. Some originalists argue that the modern state cannot be justified, while others accept existing precedents as a "pragmatic exception" to originalism. Non-originalists, in turn, point to these difficulties as a refutation of orignalist premises.

Contemporary originalist readings have tended to view the commerce power through modern eyes. Originalists defending narrow readings of federal power have identified “commerce” with the trade of commodities; originalists defending broad readings of federal ...


The Reconstruction Power, Jack M. Balkin Feb 2010

The Reconstruction Power, Jack M. Balkin

Faculty Scholarship Series

Modern doctrine has not been faithful to the text, history, and structure of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments. These amendments were designed to give Congress broad powers to protect civil rights and civil liberties; together they form Congress's Reconstruction Power.

Congress gave itself broad powers because it believed it could not trust the Supreme Court to protect the rights of the freedmen. The Supreme Court soon realized Congress's fears, limiting not only the scope of the Reconstruction Amendments but also Congress's powers to enforce them in decisions like United States v. Cruikshank and the Civil Rights ...


The Constitutional Canon As Argumentative Metonymy, Ian C. Bartrum May 2009

The Constitutional Canon As Argumentative Metonymy, Ian C. Bartrum

Faculty Scholarship Series

This article builds on Philip Bobbitt's Wittgensteinian insights into constitutional argument and law. I examine the way that we interact with canonical texts as we construct arguments in the forms that Bobbitt has described. I contend that these texts serve as metonyms for larger sets of associated principles and values, and that their invocation usually is not meant to point to the literal meaning of the text itself. This conception helps explain how a canonical text's meaning in constitutional argument can evolve over time, and hopefully offers the creative practitioner some insight into the kinds of arguments that ...


Constitutional Crises, Jack M. Balkin, Sanford Levinson Aug 2008

Constitutional Crises, Jack M. Balkin, Sanford Levinson

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Constitution of the United States was written against the background of perceived crisis. 4 It is therefore no surprise that the language of “crisis” has never been absent from discussions of American politics or American constitutionalism. It would be remarkable indeed if a country that has unceremoniously ignored an existing constitution—the Articles of Confederation—in order to propose and ratify a radically different one, engaged in civil war, suffered a series of economic depressions, fought two world wars (and several other major conflicts), and expanded from the eastern seaboard to the mid-Pacific and the Caribbean Sea 5 could ...


Accommodating Discrimination, Ashlie Warnick Apr 2008

Accommodating Discrimination, Ashlie Warnick

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Supreme Court's jurisprudence on church-state issues is unsettled. With respect to the Establishment Clause, the three-pronged test from Lemon v. Kurtzman is often used to hold government benefits to religious organizations unconstitutional. But, in cases where the majority of the Court finds the governmental benefit permissible, Lemon is generally unmentioned. This problem is confounded when the Court considers accommodations for religious organizations. Lemon, without refinement, is ill-suited to application to such accommodations. Does allowing religious organizations an exemption from generally applicable laws benefit a religious organization in violation of the Establishment Clause or does failing to provide the ...


Proportionality Balancing And Global Constitutionalism, Alec Stone Sweet, Jud Mathews Mar 2008

Proportionality Balancing And Global Constitutionalism, Alec Stone Sweet, Jud Mathews

Faculty Scholarship Series

Over the past fifty years, proportionality balancing – an analytical procedure akin to “strict scrutiny” in the United States – has become the dominant technique of rights adjudication in the world. From German origins, proportionality analysis spread across Europe, into Commonwealth systems (Canada, New Zealand, South Africa), and Israel; it has also migrated to treaty-based regimes, including the European Union, the European Convention on Human Rights, and the World Trade Organization. Part I proposes a theory of why judges are attracted to the procedure, an account that blends strategic and normative elements. Parts II and III provide a genealogy of proportionality, trace ...


Slicing The American Pie: Federalism And Personal Law, Jeffrey A. Redding Apr 2007

Slicing The American Pie: Federalism And Personal Law, Jeffrey A. Redding

Faculty Scholarship Series

In this piece, I draw upon Indian and other comparative legal experience to argue that the present U.S. system of territorial federalism resonates deeply with those systems of “personal law” that are commonly found around the world. Under a personal law system, a state enforces different laws for each of the state’s different religious or ethnic communities - which is one reason such systems have been so heavily interrogated by U.N. and other international organisations for their human rights implications. Similarly, as well, U.S. First Amendment jurisprudence has frowned upon the carving out of religious-group exceptions to ...