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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Sanctity Of Polling Places, Timothy Zick Oct 2008

The Sanctity Of Polling Places, Timothy Zick

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Pole Dancing: The New Pilates?, Timothy Zick Sep 2008

Pole Dancing: The New Pilates?, Timothy Zick

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Free Speech And Human Dignity, Steven J. Heyman Apr 2008

Free Speech And Human Dignity, Steven J. Heyman

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Digitus Impudicus: The Middle Finger And The Law, Ira Robbins Apr 2008

Digitus Impudicus: The Middle Finger And The Law, Ira Robbins

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The middle finger is one of the most commonly used insulting gestures in the United States. The finger, which is used to convey a wide range of emotions, is visible on streets and highways, in schools, shopping malls, and sporting events, in courts and execution chambers, in advertisements and on magazine covers, and even on the hallowed floor of the United States Senate. Despite its ubiquity, however, as a number of recent cases demonstrate, those who use the middle finger in public run the risk of being stopped, arrested, prosecuted, fined, and even incarcerated under disorderly conduct or breach of ...


Lapdogs, Watchdogs, And Scapegoats: The Press And National Security Information, Mary-Rose Papandrea Feb 2008

Lapdogs, Watchdogs, And Scapegoats: The Press And National Security Information, Mary-Rose Papandrea

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In the United States, the Executive branch possesses virtually unbridled classification authority to keep information from the public. Although the Freedom of Information Act and whistleblower protection laws serve as some check on the Executive’s power over national security information, these tools remain largely ineffectual. Because the desire for tight information control competes with the demands of newsgathering, a “game of leaks” has developed among government officials and reporters in which the press alternatively serves as lapdogs, watchdogs, and scapegoats for the Executive branch. This Article demonstrates that the government has been communicating information to the public through leaks ...


Free Speech And The Case For Constitutional Exceptionalism, Roger P. Alford Jan 2008

Free Speech And The Case For Constitutional Exceptionalism, Roger P. Alford

Journal Articles

Embodied in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the evocative proposition that [e]veryone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression. But beneath that level of abstraction there is anything but universal agreement. Modern democratic societies disagree on the text, content, theory, and practice of this liberty. They disagree on whether it is a privileged right or a subordinate value. They disagree on what constitutes speech and which speech is worthy of protection. They disagree on theoretical foundations, uncertain if the right is grounded in libertarian impulses, the promotion of a marketplace of ideas, or the advancement ...