Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Law

A Sleeping Giant: §2 Of The Kentucky Constitution, Allison I. Connelly Jun 1992

A Sleeping Giant: §2 Of The Kentucky Constitution, Allison I. Connelly

Law Faculty Popular Media

In this newsletter article, Professor Connelly discusses Section 2 of the Kentucky Constitution which prohibits the exercise of arbitrary official power.


Reflections On Recent Remarks Of "That Unnecessary And Dangerous Officer", Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1992

Reflections On Recent Remarks Of "That Unnecessary And Dangerous Officer", Roger J. Miner '56

Flag Day & Law Day Ceremonies

No abstract provided.


The Sleeper Wakes: The History And Legacy Of The Twenty-Seventh Amendment, Richard B. Bernstein Jan 1992

The Sleeper Wakes: The History And Legacy Of The Twenty-Seventh Amendment, Richard B. Bernstein

Articles & Chapters

No provision of the United States Constitution has a more drawn-out, tortured history than the Twenty-seventh Amendment, which was ratified more than two centuries after Representative James Madison introduced it in the First Congress.

In this Article, Professor Bernstein traces the Amendment's origins to the legislative political culture of the late eighteenth century, as influenced by the controversy over ratifying the Constitution. He then examines the perennial controversies over congressional compensation in American history, elucidating how in the 1980s and 1990s public anger at Congress reached critical mcm sufficient to propel the 1789 compensation amendment into the Constitution. Finally ...


Abstract Principle V. Contextual Conceptions Of Harm: A Comment On R. V. Butler, Jamie Cameron Jan 1992

Abstract Principle V. Contextual Conceptions Of Harm: A Comment On R. V. Butler, Jamie Cameron

Articles & Book Chapters

This comment provides a critique of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in R. v. Butler, which held that section 163(8) of the Criminal Code, defining obscenity, is a reasonable limit on freedom of expression under section 1 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Before discussing the Charter, the Court expanded the scope of section 163(8) to include a prohibition against sexually explicit material that is degrading or dehumanizing. Initially, the author is critical of the Court's methodology, which enlarged section 163(8) at the expense of expressive freedom, without even mentioning the Charter ...


United States Supreme Court: 1991-92 Term, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 1992

United States Supreme Court: 1991-92 Term, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


United States Supreme Court: 1990-91 Term, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 1992

United States Supreme Court: 1990-91 Term, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Reconstructing Liberty, Robin West Jan 1992

Reconstructing Liberty, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

It is commonly and rightly understood in this country that our constitutional system ensures, or seeks to ensure, that individuals are accorded the greatest degree of personal, political, social, and economic liberty possible, consistent with a like amount of liberty given to others, the duty and right of the community to establish the conditions for a moral and secure collective life, and the responsibility of the state to provide for the common defense of the community against outside aggression. Our distinctive cultural and constitutional commitment to individual liberty places very real restraints on what our elected representatives can do, even ...


Legislative Veto Of Administrative Rules In Missouri: A Constitutional Virus, Kenneth D. Dean Jan 1992

Legislative Veto Of Administrative Rules In Missouri: A Constitutional Virus, Kenneth D. Dean

Faculty Publications

The purpose of this Article is to examine the constitutionality of the legislative veto as it exists in Missouri, specifically the powers of the JCAR. Part II of the Article traces the history of the JCAR and the various types of powers given to it. Part III of the Article examines the experiences of the United States government and other states to determine their applicability to Missouri. Part IV examines the various grants of power to determine whether they comply with the Missouri constitution.


Abstract Democracy: A Review Of Ackerman's We The People, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1992

Abstract Democracy: A Review Of Ackerman's We The People, Terrance Sandalow

Reviews

We the People: Foundations is an ambitious book, the first of three volumes in which Professor Ackerman proposes to recast conventional understanding of and contemporary debate about American constitutional law. Unfortunately, the book's rhetoricinflated, self-important, and self-congratulatory-impedes the effort to come to terms with its argument. How, for example, does one respond to a book that opens by asking whether the reader will have "the strength" to accept its thesis? Or that announces the author's intention of "engaging" two of the most influential works of intellectual history of the past several decades-and then discusses one in two and ...


Reed Dickerson’S Originalism — What It Contributes To Contemporary Constitutional Debate, Thomas B. Mcaffee Jan 1992

Reed Dickerson’S Originalism — What It Contributes To Contemporary Constitutional Debate, Thomas B. Mcaffee

Scholarly Works

In this article the author offers his personal gratitude for the work of Reed Dickerson, along with some thoughts on his important contributions to our understanding of the interpretive process. As a young scholar in need of help in grappling with the continuing debate over constitutional interpretation, the author turned, at the suggestion of colleagues, to Reed Dickerson’s impressive book on statutory interpretation. The hours spent attempting to ingest Reed’s thoughtful work were amply rewarded, and the author took the occasion of publishing an article on the original intent debate to refer in an initial footnote to his ...


Prolegomena To A Meaningful Debate Of The “Unwritten Constitution” Thesis, Thomas B. Mcaffee Jan 1992

Prolegomena To A Meaningful Debate Of The “Unwritten Constitution” Thesis, Thomas B. Mcaffee

Scholarly Works

Seventeen years ago Professor Grey launched the modern debate over the idea of an unwritten Constitution by suggesting that the key to defending modern fundamental rights decision-making might be to rediscover the founding generation's commitment to natural law and unwritten sources of basic rights. Some modern Supreme Court decisions, Grey suggested, might be better justified by reliance upon the methodology suggested by Justice Chase's famous opinion in Calder v. Bull than by looking to the justification for judicial review offered by Chief Justice Marshall in Marbury v. Madison. Grey's arguments for the unwritten Constitution idea has struck ...


The Bill Of Rights, Social Contract Theory, And The Rights “Retained” By The People, Thomas B. Mcaffee Jan 1992

The Bill Of Rights, Social Contract Theory, And The Rights “Retained” By The People, Thomas B. Mcaffee

Scholarly Works

The Ninth Amendment provides that “[t]he enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.” There is no question that this Amendment was designed as a savings clause, to ensure that the specification of particular rights would not raise an inference that the Bill of Rights exhausted the rights which the people held as against the newly-created national government. But there is an ongoing debate as to nature of these additional rights retained by the people and as to the sort of claim they might support against the ...