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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Twin Demons Of The Trump-Bannon Assault On Democracy, Joseph P. Tomain Jan 2017

The Twin Demons Of The Trump-Bannon Assault On Democracy, Joseph P. Tomain

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

On January 30, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order "Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs." Then, on February 24, he signed an executive order on “Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda.” Together these two executive orders constitute a severe threat to American society and the American economy. In the words of Stephen Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, they represent a plan for “the deconstruction of the administrative state.”

The purpose of the administrative state can be most simply stated this way: Unless otherwise stated in the enabling legislation, government regulation makes sense when the benefits of regulation outweigh the ...


The Puzzling Presumption Of Reviewability, Nicholas Bagley Mar 2014

The Puzzling Presumption Of Reviewability, Nicholas Bagley

Articles

The presumption in favor of judicial review of agency action is a cornerstone of administrative law, accepted by courts and commentators alike as both legally appropriate and obviously desirable. Yet the presumption is puzzling. As with any canon of statutory construction that serves a substantive end, it should find a source in history, positive law, the Constitution, or sound policy considerations. None of these, however, offers a plausible justification for the presumption. As for history, the sort of judicial review that the presumption favors - appellate-style arbitrariness review - was not only unheard of prior to the twentieth century, but was commonly ...


Avoiding Independent Agency Armageddon, Kent H. Barnett May 2012

Avoiding Independent Agency Armageddon, Kent H. Barnett

Scholarly Works

In Free Enterprise Fund v. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated Congress’ use of two layers of tenure protection to shield Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) members from the President’s removal. The SEC could appoint and remove PCAOB members. An implied tenure-protection provision protected the SEC from the President’s at-will removal. And a statutory tenure-protection provision protected PCAOB members from the SEC’s at-will removal. The Court held that these “tiered” tenure protections unconstitutionally impinged upon the President’s removal power because they prevented the President from holding the SEC responsible for ...


Government By Contract And The Structural Constitution, Kimberly L. Wehle Dec 2011

Government By Contract And The Structural Constitution, Kimberly L. Wehle

All Faculty Scholarship

Although private parties have performed government functions throughout most of Western history, mainstream administrative law scholarship is dotted with concerns over the extent to which modern federal government activities are outsourced to private contractors. Federal contractors routinely exercise authority that is classically “executive” in nature. They write regulations, interpret laws, administer foreign aid, manage nuclear weapons sites and intelligence operations, interrogate detainees, control borders, design surveillance systems, and provide military support in combat zones. Administrative law places few constraints on private contractors, and prevailing constitutional principles — the state action and private delegation doctrines, in particular — are either inept at holding ...


Two Masters, Carl E. Schneider Jan 2010

Two Masters, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

American government rests on the principle of distrust of government. Not only is power within the federal government checked and balanced. Power is divided between the federal government and the state governments. So what if a state law conflicts with a federal law? The Constitution says that the "Constitution, and the Laws of the United States ... shall be the supreme Law of the Land; ... any Thing in the ... Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding." Sometimes the conflict between federal and state law is obvious and the Supremacy Clause is easily applied. But sometimes ...


Preemption And Theories Of Federalism, Robert R. M. Verchick, Nina A. Mendelson Jan 2009

Preemption And Theories Of Federalism, Robert R. M. Verchick, Nina A. Mendelson

Book Chapters

American government is an experiment in redundancy, with powers and duties shared among federal, state, and local decision makers. The arrange­ment is designed to divide power, maximize self-rule, and foster innovation, but it also can breed confusion. In the areas of public safety and environ­mental protection, state and federal leaders (to name the two most active players in these disputes) are often seen jockeying for the inside track, hoping to secure the resources or authority needed to promote their views of the public good or gain politically. To outside observers, the best outcomes are not obvious. For example ...


Regulation Of Water Use And Takings—The Government Lawyer’S Perspective, Richard M. Frank Jun 1994

Regulation Of Water Use And Takings—The Government Lawyer’S Perspective, Richard M. Frank

Regulatory Takings and Resources: What Are the Constitutional Limits? (Summer Conference, June 13-15)

11 pages.

Contains 3 pages of references.


Searching For Basinwide Solutions To Endangered Species Problems Of The South Platte Of Colorado, James S. Lochhead Jun 1994

Searching For Basinwide Solutions To Endangered Species Problems Of The South Platte Of Colorado, James S. Lochhead

Regulatory Takings and Resources: What Are the Constitutional Limits? (Summer Conference, June 13-15)

42 pages (includes illustrations and map).

Contains endnotes.


Legislative Veto Of Administrative Rules In Missouri: A Constitutional Virus, Kenneth D. Dean Jan 1992

Legislative Veto Of Administrative Rules In Missouri: A Constitutional Virus, Kenneth D. Dean

Faculty Publications

The purpose of this Article is to examine the constitutionality of the legislative veto as it exists in Missouri, specifically the powers of the JCAR. Part II of the Article traces the history of the JCAR and the various types of powers given to it. Part III of the Article examines the experiences of the United States government and other states to determine their applicability to Missouri. Part IV examines the various grants of power to determine whether they comply with the Missouri constitution.


The National Park System And Development On Private Lands: Opportunities And Tools To Protect Park Resources, Michael Mantell Sep 1986

The National Park System And Development On Private Lands: Opportunities And Tools To Protect Park Resources, Michael Mantell

External Development Affecting the National Parks: Preserving "The Best Idea We Ever Had" (September 14-16)

34 pages.

Contains footnotes.


Can Consent Waive Absolute Rights To An Article Iii Court (85-621) (85-642), Ronald Filler Jan 1986

Can Consent Waive Absolute Rights To An Article Iii Court (85-621) (85-642), Ronald Filler

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Interstate Transfers Of Water: Many A Slip ‘Twixt The Cup And The Lip, Howard Holme Oct 1985

Interstate Transfers Of Water: Many A Slip ‘Twixt The Cup And The Lip, Howard Holme

Colorado Water Issues and Options: The 90's and Beyond: Toward Maximum Beneficial Use of Colorado's Water Resources (October 8)

44 pages (includes maps and tables).

Contains 6 pages of footnotes.


Board Of Curators Of The University Of Missouri V. Horowitz: Academic Versus Judicial Expertise, R. Lawrence Dessem Jan 1978

Board Of Curators Of The University Of Missouri V. Horowitz: Academic Versus Judicial Expertise, R. Lawrence Dessem

Faculty Publications

In Board of Curators of the University of Missouri v. Horowitz' the United States Supreme Court rejected the argument that public university students are constitutionally entitled to a hearing prior to their dismissal from school for academic reasons. In ruling against a former medical student at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, the Court concluded that "the determination whether to dismiss a student for academic reasons requires an expert evaluation of cumulative information and is not readily adapted to the procedural tools of judicial or administrative decisionmaking. ' In this article that conclusion and the several opinions in Horowitz will be analyzed ...


Student Due Process Rights In Academic Dismissals From The Public Schools, R. Lawrence Dessem Jan 1976

Student Due Process Rights In Academic Dismissals From The Public Schools, R. Lawrence Dessem

Faculty Publications

This article, however, goes beyond the argument that education is one of the most valuable benefits which government in this country provides. The thesis of the article is that education is not only very important to millions of Americans, but that students have constitutionally protected liberty and property interests in their public educations and the courts should therefore require notice and hearing prior to the deprivation of these interests, even when the deprivation is for strictly academic reasons.