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Full-Text Articles in Law

#Lolnothingmatters, Chris Sagers Jan 2018

#Lolnothingmatters, Chris Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Institutions matter in antitrust, at least as much as ideas. Most antitrust arguments, and especially the contretemps currently enjoying some attention in the popular press, imagine that antitrust problems are short- or medium-term matters, and that they can be corrected with local doctrinal steps. I suggest there is a deeper problem, a phenomenon more deeply inherent in the nature of competition itself. The problem will cyclically recur, so long as institutional brakes are unavailable to keep it at bay. Specifically, it seems that competitive markets are difficult to preserve without some prospective, no-fault rule to control concentration for its own ...


O’Bannon V. National Collegiate Athletic Association: Why The Ninth Circuit Should Not Block The Floodgates Of Change In College Athletics, Christopher Sagers, Michael A. Carrier Jan 2015

O’Bannon V. National Collegiate Athletic Association: Why The Ninth Circuit Should Not Block The Floodgates Of Change In College Athletics, Christopher Sagers, Michael A. Carrier

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

In O’Bannon v. National Collegiate Athletic Ass’n, then-Chief Judge Claudia Wilken of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued a groundbreaking decision, potentially opening the floodgates for challenges to National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) amateurism rules. The NCAA was finally put to a full evidentiary demonstration of its amateurism defense, and its proof was found emphatically wanting. We agree with Professor Edelman that O’Bannon could bring about significant changes, but only if the Ninth Circuit affirms. We write mainly to address the NCAA’s vigorous pending appeal and the views of certain ...


Why Copperweld Was Actually Kind Of Dumb: Sound, Fury, And The Once And Still Missing Antitrust Theory Of The Firm?, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2011

Why Copperweld Was Actually Kind Of Dumb: Sound, Fury, And The Once And Still Missing Antitrust Theory Of The Firm?, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Since even before Copperweld Corp. v. Independence Tube Corp., 467 U.S. 752 (1984), it has been thought that antitrust needs some "theory of the firm" to inform its application of a "single-entity" defense in Sherman Act section 1 litigation. Not only is that sense mistaken, it is emblematic of the deep misdirection of contemporary antitrust. It shows just how far antitrust has forgotten that it is a law, a practical tool to implement policy choices made through our system of government. Much too much of the time, it seems to fancy itself rather an abstract policy seminar to be ...


Standardization And Markets: Just Exactly Who Is The Government, And Why Should Antitrust Care?, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2011

Standardization And Markets: Just Exactly Who Is The Government, And Why Should Antitrust Care?, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

We take for granted that the basic choice in public policy is between allocation of resources by government bureaucracy, on the one hand, or allocation by markets, on the other. But that dichotomy is false, and at least under contemporary circumstances it is more accurate to describe the choice as between allocation by one kind of bureaucracy and allocation by a different kind of bureaucracy. This poses a problem for our antitrust policy, because it lacks any coherent guidance as to how to address those entities and transactions that are not governmental but are also not simply market-governed. This paper ...


Much Ado About Possibly Pretty Little: Mccarran-Ferguson Repeal In The Health Care Reform Effort, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2010

Much Ado About Possibly Pretty Little: Mccarran-Ferguson Repeal In The Health Care Reform Effort, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Since 1945, the McCarran-Ferguson Act (MFA) has shielded the “business of insurance” from antitrust liability, so long as the challenged conduct is “regulated by State Law” and does not constitute “boycott, coercion, or intimidation.” This law, like the dozens of other statutory antitrust exemptions that still exist for other industries, has more or less always been controversial, and efforts to repeal it date back more than thirty years. This Essay asks two questions: (1) what consequences the pending repeal measures might have if one of them becomes law; and (2) what a close examination of this effort might teach us ...


Dagher, American Needle, And The Evolving Antitrust Theory Of The Firm: What Will Become Of Section 1?, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2009

Dagher, American Needle, And The Evolving Antitrust Theory Of The Firm: What Will Become Of Section 1?, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This summer, on the last regularly scheduled sitting of its October 2008 Term, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in a case that could have far-reaching consequences throughout the law of Sherman Act Section 1. In the case under review, American Needle, Inc. v. NFL, the Seventh Circuit, by unanimous panel decision, entered a striking ruling in the long-running debate over whether professional sports leagues can be “single entities” under Copperweld. The court not only said yes, but did so in what is possibly the most likely context in which the member teams could have competed with one another - the licensing ...


Competition Come Full Circle? Pending Legislation To Repeal The U.S. Railroad Exemption, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2009

Competition Come Full Circle? Pending Legislation To Repeal The U.S. Railroad Exemption, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Repeal of the railroad antitrust exemptions has been advocated ever since deregulation of that industry, and bills have been introduced twice to do it. However, there is no particular reason yet to believe railroad exemption repeal will occur in this Congress. The pending bills have not progressed far and have failed before, and they are opposed by the industry. But even if they progress, and assuming there is not also some significant change to the overall railroad regulatory framework, it seems unlikely that antitrust litigation will be very successful or that it will much change the status quo in rail ...


Raising The Price Of Pork In Texas: A Few Thoughts On Ghosh, Bush, And The Future Of Antitrust Immunity, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2008

Raising The Price Of Pork In Texas: A Few Thoughts On Ghosh, Bush, And The Future Of Antitrust Immunity, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Shubha Ghosh and Darren Bush were personally involved in real-world opposition to the Love Field airline terminal deal, organizing petitioning efforts in Congress and otherwise trying to get it stopped.My comments here basically ride two horses, because Ghosh and Bush raise two important and intriguing problems. First, I think the problem in the Love Field case and other case law they discuss is really just the problem with all of federal antitrust. Antitrust is in a dire state across the board. Lately, we seem near the completion of its euthanasia, which happened pretty much as Adams and Brock predicted ...


The Demise Of Regulation In Ocean Shipping: A Study In The Evolution Of Competition Policy And The Predictive Power Of Microeconomics, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2006

The Demise Of Regulation In Ocean Shipping: A Study In The Evolution Of Competition Policy And The Predictive Power Of Microeconomics, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Over its 140 year history, ocean liner shipping has almost always enjoyed an antitrust exemption permitting price-fixing cartels of ocean carriers. The exemption was premised on the belief that problems of cost and capacity inherent in the trade can be resolved only by horizontal collusion. Now that that exemption has been whittled away by deregulatory efforts, the pre- and post-deregulation evidence presents one of the world's rare opportunities for natural experiment on the behavior and effectiveness of collusive cartel pricing. Moreover, because normal and effective competition never really existed prior to 1998, the normative foundation of the antitrust exemption ...


Antitrust Immunity And Standard Setting Organizations: A Case Study In The Public-Private Distinction, Christopher L. Sagers Jan 2004

Antitrust Immunity And Standard Setting Organizations: A Case Study In The Public-Private Distinction, Christopher L. Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This paper uses an ongoing issue of local legal doctrine as a case study to provide insights into a problem of larger political philosophy: the problem whether the difference between "public" and "private" should be made to matter and, indeed, whether there is a difference at all. The case study is as follows: In our system, state governments are free to fashion their own trade policies in virtually any manner they choose. During the past century there has evolved a complex range of relationships between government and the businesses regulated by those policies, the result often being that businesses themselves ...


The Legal Structure Of American Freedom And The Provenance Of The Antitrust Immunities, Christopher Sagers Jan 2002

The Legal Structure Of American Freedom And The Provenance Of The Antitrust Immunities, Christopher Sagers

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

It is a reflection of the subtle relationship between legal doctrine and the larger social context it regulates that, on occasion, some humble point of mere theory proves to be the lynchpin of a serious social problem. Often the most pernicious aspect of such a situation will be the very obscuriyy that causes courts to overlook it.

That is emphatically the case with the issue addressed in this paper. Confusion persists over the seemingly academic question whether the so-called "Noerr-Pennington" or "petitioning" immunity, a doctrine in antitrust law which protects persons from being sued when they seek action from their ...