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Series

2018

Indian and Aboriginal Law

Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Chapter 8: Indigenous Belonging: Membership And Identity In The Undrip: Articles 9, 33, 35, And 36, Shin Imai, Kathryn Gunn Jan 2018

Chapter 8: Indigenous Belonging: Membership And Identity In The Undrip: Articles 9, 33, 35, And 36, Shin Imai, Kathryn Gunn

Articles & Book Chapters

The recognition of Indigenous peoples' right to determine their own membership is crucial for their ability to meaningfully exercise their right to self-determination. The Declaration addresses rights of membership directly in Article 9 (right to belong), 33 (right to determine membership), 35 (right to determine responsibilities of members), and 36 (right to maintain relations across borders). Together, these provisions reinforce the right of Indigenous peoples to define themselves, both in terms of membership and geographic scope.


The Source, Nature, And Content Of The Crown’S Underlying Title To Aboriginal Title Lands, Kent Mcneil Jan 2018

The Source, Nature, And Content Of The Crown’S Underlying Title To Aboriginal Title Lands, Kent Mcneil

Articles & Book Chapters

The highest courts in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand have consistently held that the Crown has the underlying title to Aboriginal title lands. The United States Supreme Court has likewise concluded that either the federal or state governments have the underlying title to Indian lands. However, the source, nature, and content of this title remain obscure. This article will examine the relevant case law and contend that, in Canada, the Crown’s underlying title is a purely proprietary interest that does not amount to a current beneficial interest and does not entail any jurisdictional authority. It is sourced in the ...