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Book Review: Hugh Jackson: Australians And The Christian God: An Historical Study, Josip Matesic Jun 2014

Book Review: Hugh Jackson: Australians And The Christian God: An Historical Study, Josip Matesic

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Hugh Jackson’s Australians and the Christian God is a valuable first attempt to articulate the historical relationship of Australians to the Christian God. Although this book contains some discussions that may serve to stimulate further investigation, its major shortcoming is that it is simply too short and therefore covers its subject matter only superficially.


Keynote Address At 'The 7th Apb Theatre School Directors Conference & Theatre Festival', Janys Hayes May 2014

Keynote Address At 'The 7th Apb Theatre School Directors Conference & Theatre Festival', Janys Hayes

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

To The Shanghai Theatre Academy, The Directors of the Asia Pacific Bureau, To UNESCO’s International Theatre Institute, and all the students participating in this APB Theatre Schools’ Festival. Welcome. NI How!

I am honoured to address this widely experienced company of theatre exponents here today.

Thank you to the APB for inviting us from the University of Wollongong to participate in this year’s Festival. (Wollongong by the way is an indigenous name that means ‘the sound of the sea’).


Pete Seeger: A Life Of Song, And The Power Of ‘We’, Anthony Ashbolt Jan 2014

Pete Seeger: A Life Of Song, And The Power Of ‘We’, Anthony Ashbolt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

We Shall Overcome became the theme song of the American civil rights movement in the 1960s. It is most identified with Pete Seeger, the great American musician who died January 27.

Yet as Arlo Guthrie put it this week: “Of course he passed away. But that doesn’t mean he’s gone."


Shaming And Sanitation In Indonesia: A Return To Colonial Public Health Practices?, Susan Engel, Anggun Susilo Jan 2014

Shaming And Sanitation In Indonesia: A Return To Colonial Public Health Practices?, Susan Engel, Anggun Susilo

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Adequate sanitation is vital to human health, yet progress on the Millennium Development Goal for sanitation has been slow and the target is likely to be missed by one billion people. Indonesia has the third highest number of people of any country in the world without access to sanitation and, like most developing countries, it is devoting insufficient resources to the issue. In rural areas, rather than providing additional funding, the government - with support of the World Bank - has promoted the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach, which uses social mobilization to encourage people to construct their own latrines. In Indonesia ...


Teachers' Attitudes Towards Computer-Assisted Language Learning In Australia And Spain, Lidia Bilbatua, Alfredo Herrero De Haro Jan 2014

Teachers' Attitudes Towards Computer-Assisted Language Learning In Australia And Spain, Lidia Bilbatua, Alfredo Herrero De Haro

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

A review of the existing literature shows that when it comes to studying attitudes towards CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning), researchers have traditionally focused on students’ perspectives and ignored teachers’ views. This study focuses on teachers’ attitudes towards CALL in order to gain a better understanding of what issues, advantages, and disadvantages teachers come across when incorporating CALL into their teaching. Furthermore, a group of teachers from Australia and Spain has been interviewed to compare how views on CALL vary across professionals in these two countries. As some authors have previously proved, the more IT literate teachers are, the more likely ...


The Durability Of The 'Antarctic Model' And Southern Ocean Governance, Ruth A. Davis Jan 2014

The Durability Of The 'Antarctic Model' And Southern Ocean Governance, Ruth A. Davis

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It is now well over 50 years since the conclusion of the Antarctic Treaty , the foundation of the Antarctic Treaty System (‘ATS’). At the 1959 Washington Conference, 12 nations gathered to draft the agreement that formally recognised “that it is in the interests of all mankind that Antarctica shall continue forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and shall not become the scene or object of international discord”, and “[a]cknowledging the substantial contributions to scientific knowledge resulting from international cooperation in scientific investigation in Antarctica”. These twin goals, of preserving peace on the Antarctic continent and promoting polar ...


Greenhouse Gas Emissions From International Shipping: The Response From China's Shipping Industry To The Regulatory Iinitiatives Of The International Maritime Organization, Yubing Shi Jan 2014

Greenhouse Gas Emissions From International Shipping: The Response From China's Shipping Industry To The Regulatory Iinitiatives Of The International Maritime Organization, Yubing Shi

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) received its mandate to regulate shipping greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Kyoto Protocol. However, the IMO Convention and the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea also provide it with competence in this area. In exercising its mandate, the IMO has developed regulatory initiatives. China’s shipping industry is playing a growing role in the international shipping market, and its response to these initiatives will have a substantial effect on the future application of these regulations. This article analyses the GHG mandate of the IMO, examines the main outcomes achieved within the organization ...


Gleams Of Light: Evolving Knowledge In Writing Creative Arts Doctorates, Diana Wood Conroy Jan 2014

Gleams Of Light: Evolving Knowledge In Writing Creative Arts Doctorates, Diana Wood Conroy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

From the mid-1980s to the present, art schools have embedded themselves within university structures in Australia. Around 35 universities now offer research degrees in creative arts (Baker and Buckley, 2009). Accompanying this development, the teaching of art practice and theory has followed the humanities in embracing philosophies of semiotics and post-structuralism from Europe and America through the lenses of feminism and postcolonialism.


Gigantic Shipbuilders Under The Imo Mandate Of Ghg Emissions: With Special References To China, Japan And Korea, Yubing Shi Jan 2014

Gigantic Shipbuilders Under The Imo Mandate Of Ghg Emissions: With Special References To China, Japan And Korea, Yubing Shi

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

To address greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, the International Maritime Organization has adopted technical and operational measures, and discussed the possibilihj of adopting market-based measures. China, Japan and South Korea are major shipbuilding nations in the world, and have differing responses towards the IMO's regulatory initiatives. This paper conducts a comparative assessment of these three countries' positions on regulatory principles of the greenhouse gas issue, and concludes that their differentiated perspectives on this matter reflect their different regulatory interests. It is significant to take their differentiated interests into account in the developing regulatory regime to avoid disproportionate burdens ...


The Affective Power Of Audio, Siobhan A. Mchugh Jan 2014

The Affective Power Of Audio, Siobhan A. Mchugh

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Oral historian Siobhán McHugh talks us through the primal and intimate nature of soundscapes, sharing her favourite ‘driveway moments’ and showcasing the power of audio storytelling. With carefully curated links to some of the most powerful and affecting moments she’s experienced in the medium, this piece just might convert you to the spoken (but unseen) word – if you’re not hooked on it already.


We Need A Global Conservation Agreement For The High Seas, Robin Warner Jan 2014

We Need A Global Conservation Agreement For The High Seas, Robin Warner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The high seas cover about 50% of Earth’s surface and host a major share of the world’s biodiversity, but remain largely ungoverned. With increasing threats to open ocean ecosystems, now more than ever we need a high seas conservation agreement.

Recently the first of three meetings was held in New York to assess the scope, parameters and feasibility of an international conservation agreement for the high seas and the sustainable use of its biodiversity. States meeting at the UN will decide by September 2015 whether to have such an agreement.

So why are the high seas important for ...


Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realities, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realities, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In October 2013, the right-wing journal Quadrant published the book Australia s Secret War, an account by conservative intellectual Hal Cole batch of home front industrial disruptions by Australian trade unions during World War 2. Described as a secret history rescued from "folk memory", one previously suppressed by leftists, it detailed 'treacherous' industrial actions by unionists that variously denied or delayed vital war materials to the frontlines between 1939 and 1945, resulting in the deaths of service personnel.

These actions, the argument went, pointed to a deliberate and coordinated attempt at sabotaging the war effort by the communist leaderships of ...


'Fictional' History Opens New Front In War On Workers, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

'Fictional' History Opens New Front In War On Workers, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

At the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards on 8 December 2014, the joint winner of the Australian History Award was Hal G. P. Colebatch for his book Australia’s Secret War: How Unionists Sabotaged our Troops in World War II. The judging panel was chaired by right-wing think tanker Gerard Henderson of the Sydney Institute, a diehard fan of ‘Pig Iron’ Bob Menzies, and included Peter Coleman, variously author, journalist, former Liberal Party politician, and veteran Cold War warrior.

Colebatch’s book was published in October 2013 by the conservative Australian cultural journal Quadrant, founded during the Cold War as ...


Enforcement Cooperation In Combating Illegal And Unauthorized Fishing: An Assessment Of Contemporary Practice, Stuart Kaye Jan 2014

Enforcement Cooperation In Combating Illegal And Unauthorized Fishing: An Assessment Of Contemporary Practice, Stuart Kaye

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The emergence of the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the 1970s placed potentially vast areas of the sea under national jurisdiction. Moving from relatively modest territorial seas close to the coast as the only basis of fisheries jurisdiction for States, the international community suddenly embraced a new form of jurisdiction over resources that extended fisheries up to 200 nautical miles from land. This extension brought over one third of the world's oceans, or, more importantly, approximately 90% of the world's wild fish catch, under national jurisdiction.


Getting My Hands Dirty: Research And Writing, Shady E. Cosgrove Jan 2014

Getting My Hands Dirty: Research And Writing, Shady E. Cosgrove

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Biographical note:

Shady Cosgrove is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Wollongong. Her novel What the Ground Can’t Hold (Picador 2013) tells the story of a group of people stranded in the Andes, all of whom have links to Argentina’s Dirty War. Her memoir She Played Elvis (Allen and Unwin, 2009) was shortlisted for the Australian Vogel Literary Prize, and her short stories and articles have appeared in Best Australian Stories, Antipodes, Southerly, Overland, the Sydney Morning Herald and the Melbourne Age. She has also written about the ethics of representation and teaching of creative writing. For ...


Does /E/ Split Into Four Vowel Phonemes In Western Almeria? Effects Of /S/, /R/, And /Θ/ Deletion In This Variety Of Eastern Andalusian Spanish, Alfredo Herrero De Haro Jan 2014

Does /E/ Split Into Four Vowel Phonemes In Western Almeria? Effects Of /S/, /R/, And /Θ/ Deletion In This Variety Of Eastern Andalusian Spanish, Alfredo Herrero De Haro

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As documented by several scholars, such as Wulff (1889) and Navarro Tomás (1938), Eastern Andalusian Spanish (henceforth EAS), neutralises most consonants in coda position. However, there is no consensus on the effects that consonant deletion has on surrounding vowels. Researchers of EAS, such as Mondéjar Cumpián (1979), have distinguished between two types of vowels in this variety of Spanish: vowels in coda position and vowels followed by a deleted consonant. However despite the neutralisation of most consonants in coda position in EAS, phonemic value has only been given to vowels preceding deleted /s/, as in Salvador Caja (1950) and Carlson ...


The Diggers' Wish: Set The Record Straight, Ben Morris Jan 2014

The Diggers' Wish: Set The Record Straight, Ben Morris

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper explores the issues of the participant interviewer in a military history context. Participant interviewers may have a stake in the results of their work, as they are part of the story that is under investigation and can influence the result to fit their prejudices. This paper focuses on the strong desire that the interviewees have to correct errors in the official record. As Alessandro Portelli says, 'oral history is not just a collection of stories, but also their interpretation and representation.' A narrative recorded by a participant may produce a realistic interpretation of battlefield events rather than the ...


The Cruel And Unusual Phenomenology Of Solitary Confinement, Shaun Gallagher Jan 2014

The Cruel And Unusual Phenomenology Of Solitary Confinement, Shaun Gallagher

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

What happens when subjects are deprived of intersubjective contact? This paper looks closely at the phenomenology and psychology of one example of that deprivation: solitary confinement. It also puts the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement to use in the legal context. Not only is there no consensus on whether solitary confinement is a "cruel and unusual punishment," there is no consensus on the definition of the term "cruel" in the use of that legal phrase. I argue that we can find a moral consensus on the meaning of "cruelty" by looking specifically at the phenomenology and psychology of solitary ...


More Law And Order On The Run, Julia Quilter Jan 2014

More Law And Order On The Run, Julia Quilter

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

After the July 2012 death of Thomas Kelly from a one-punch assault in Kings Cross, the NSW government engaged in a nuanced and multi-faceted response to alcohol-fuelled violence in Sydney’s major entertainment precinct. Unfortunately, the government’s latest response — the Crimes and Other Legislation Amendment (Assault and Intoxication) Act 2014 (NSW) (‘the Act’) — is deserving of no such praise. Not only is the argument that a discrete ‘one punch’ law is necessary in NSW without foundation, but the legislation has been drafted in a legally complex and confusing way that is likely to result in operational difficulty.


In Search Of Ontological Emergence: Diachronic, But Non-Supervenient, Michael D. Kirchhoff Jan 2014

In Search Of Ontological Emergence: Diachronic, But Non-Supervenient, Michael D. Kirchhoff

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Most philosophical accounts of emergence are based on supervenience, with supervenience being an ontologically synchronic relation of determination. This conception of emergence as a relation of supervenience, I will argue, is unable to make sense of the kinds of emergence that are widespread in self-organizing and nonlinear dynamical systems, including distributed cognitive systems. In these dynamical systems, an emergent property is ontological (i.e., the causal capacities of P, where P is an emergent feature, are not reducible to causal capacities of the parts, and may exert a top-down causal influence on the parts of the system) and diachronic (i ...


Book Review: Limits Of Maritime Jurisdiction By Schofield, Lee And Kwon (Eds.), Lowell Bautista Jan 2014

Book Review: Limits Of Maritime Jurisdiction By Schofield, Lee And Kwon (Eds.), Lowell Bautista

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

There has been no shortage of books written on vital aspects of oceans law and policy. But there are few with the breadth and diversity of coverage, written by the most prominent law of the sea scholars and practitioners assembled in a single volume, such as in The Limits of Maritime Jurisdiction. The appeal of this book is undeniable: it is authoritative and scholarly yet accessible and refreshingly practical both to the seasoned scholar and the practitioner, dealing with important contemporary law of the sea issues from an enduring, intellectually robust and critical perspective.


Applying The Critical Lens To Judicial Officers And Legal Practitioners Involved In Sentencing Indigenous Offenders: Will Anyone Or Anything Do?, Elena Marchetti, Janet Ransley Jan 2014

Applying The Critical Lens To Judicial Officers And Legal Practitioners Involved In Sentencing Indigenous Offenders: Will Anyone Or Anything Do?, Elena Marchetti, Janet Ransley

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In recent years there have been many attempts aimed at transforming the relationship between Indigenous people and the criminal justice system in Australia. Some of these attempts have been directed at policing relationships, including such measures as community and night patrols. Others have focused on prisons, including attempts at greater cultural accommodation, and even the building of Aboriginal prisons. The focus of this article, however, is on the relationship between Indigenous people and court processes, especially in regards to sentencing. In particular, the article explores innovative sentencing courts, practices and principles introduced across the Australian jurisdictions specifically aimed at Indigenous ...


Haunting National Boundaries: Lbgti Asylum Seekers, Nan Seuffert Jan 2014

Haunting National Boundaries: Lbgti Asylum Seekers, Nan Seuffert

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Two areas of scholarship on asylum seekers and detention camps rarely consider the position of LBGTI asylum seekers: the first is legal scholarship on asylum seeker non-entr e regime policies of 'excision' and 'exile', and the second is scholarship theorising the 'bare life', or lack of political and legal rights, and related issues encountered by asylum seekers at the boundary of the nation. This article contributes to and extends these bodies of scholarship by reading LBGTI asylum seekers into Australia's recent asylum seeker non-entr e polices of 'excision' and 'exile'. Using scholarship and reports produced internationally, it raises issues ...


Filial Obligation In Contemporary China: Evolution Of The Culture-System, Xiaoying Qi Jan 2014

Filial Obligation In Contemporary China: Evolution Of The Culture-System, Xiaoying Qi

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Family obligation, which has an exceptionally high salience in traditional Chinese society, continues to be significant in contemporary China. In family relations in particular sentiments and practices morphologically similar to those associated with xiao (filial piety) remains intact in so far as an enduring set of expectations concerning age-based obligation continues to structure behavior toward others. Researchers pursuing the theme of “individualization” in Chinese society, on the other hand, argue that family obligations and filial sentiments have substantially weakened. The present paper will show that under conditions of cultural and social change in China filial behavior through family obligation continues ...


Regional Governance For Fisheries And Biodiversity, Robin Warner, Kristina Gjerde, David Freestone Jan 2014

Regional Governance For Fisheries And Biodiversity, Robin Warner, Kristina Gjerde, David Freestone

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Strong and coherent regional governance is critical for tackling the increasing number and variety of threats to fisheries and biodiversity within and beyond national jurisdiction including overfishing, destructive fishing practices, marine pollution and climate change impacts. This chapter examines the existing legal and institutional framework for fisheries and biodiversity governance at the regional level including key regional organizations such as regional fisheries management organizations, regional seas organizations and non-binding regional initiatives. As well as highlighting the fragmentary nature of regional oceans governance, this analysis discloses the wide variety of approaches to and differing rates of progress in harmonizing fisheries and ...


History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Australian history curriculum is compulsory for Years Foundation through to Year 10. It states that its rationale is as follows: ‘The curriculum generally takes a world history approach within which the history of Australia is taught.’ The curriculum is also defined, and limited, by its three cross-curriculum priorities:

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

* Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

* Sustainability.


To Restore Federalism, Strengthen The States And Make Australia More Republican, Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

To Restore Federalism, Strengthen The States And Make Australia More Republican, Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The reform of Australia’s federation is under review. In this special series, we ask leading Australian academics to begin a debate on renewing federalism, from tax reform to the broader issues of democracy.

The University of Wollongong’s Gregory Melleuish explains how the current state-federal relationship has warped from the ideals of Australia’s constitution and why a return to republican principles must be the remedy.>p>


A Secular Australia? Ideas, Politics And The Search For Moral Order In Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Century Australia, Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

A Secular Australia? Ideas, Politics And The Search For Moral Order In Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Century Australia, Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article argues that the relationship between the religious and the secular in Australia is complex and that there has been no simple transition from a religious society to a secular one. It argues that the emergence of apparently secular moral orders in the second half of the nineteenth century involved what Steven D. Smith has termed the 'smuggling in' of ideas and beliefs which are religious in nature. This can be seen clearly in the economic debates of the second half of the nineteenth century in Australia in which a Free Trade based on an optimistic natural theology battled ...


Artifactualities: Biopolitics And Settler Colonial Liberalism, Michael R. Griffiths Jan 2014

Artifactualities: Biopolitics And Settler Colonial Liberalism, Michael R. Griffiths

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

How does one conceive the settler colony within the framework of a globalizing, transnational geopolitical order? An initial question that could function as a precondition to locating settler colonial space within the global late liberal order might proceed in the following phrasing: how are we to conceive nation-states made up predominantly of Europen-descended settlers?


Back To The Classroom: Language Educators Learning A Language, Lidia Bilbatua, Laetitia Vedrenne, Rowena G. Ward Jan 2014

Back To The Classroom: Language Educators Learning A Language, Lidia Bilbatua, Laetitia Vedrenne, Rowena G. Ward

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As part of our preparation for this presentation, we undertook research into the field of teachers as students etc but there is virtually none irrespective of language or other. Research on the motivation of students and teachers and the differences between teachers’ beliefs and their actual classroom practice is ample but there is virtually nothing on teachers as students and the impact that being a student had on their teaching practise etc. In some ways, it seems that once you are a language teacher, you are expected to remember what it is like to study a language – from our experience ...