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Full-Text Articles in Law

Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A Golden Parachute, Ryan W. Scott, David R. Stras Jan 2006

Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A Golden Parachute, Ryan W. Scott, David R. Stras

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The first vacancies on the Supreme Court in eleven years have sparked renewed debate about the continued viability of life tenure for federal judges. Scholars have decried life tenure as one of the Framers' worst blunders, pointing to issues such as strategic retirement, longer average tenure, and widespread mental infirmity of justices. In this Article, the authors argue that, notwithstanding the serious problem of mental and physical infirmity on the Court, life tenure should be retained. They also argue that recent statutory proposals to eliminate or undermine life tenure, for example through a mandatory retirement age or term limits, are ...


Revisiting "The Need For Negro Lawyers": Are Today's Black Corporate Lawyers Houstonian Social Engineers?, H. Timothy Lovelace Jr. Jan 2006

Revisiting "The Need For Negro Lawyers": Are Today's Black Corporate Lawyers Houstonian Social Engineers?, H. Timothy Lovelace Jr.

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Internationalizing U.S. Legal Education: A Report On The Education Of Transnational Lawyers, Carole Silver Jan 2006

Internationalizing U.S. Legal Education: A Report On The Education Of Transnational Lawyers, Carole Silver

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This article analyses the role of U.S. law schools in educating foreign lawyers and the increasingly competitive global market for graduate legal education. U.S. law schools have been at the forefront of this competition, but little has been reported about their graduate programs. This article presents original research on the programs and their students, drawn from interviews with directors of graduate programs at 35 U.S. law schools, information available on law school web sites about the programs, and interviews with graduates of U.S. graduate programs. Finally, the article considers the responses of U.S. law schools ...


Indiana Law In Evolution, Yvonne Cripps Jan 2006

Indiana Law In Evolution, Yvonne Cripps

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


An Empirical Study Of Single-Tier Versus Two-Tier Partnerships In The Am Law 200, William D. Henderson Jan 2006

An Empirical Study Of Single-Tier Versus Two-Tier Partnerships In The Am Law 200, William D. Henderson

Articles by Maurer Faculty

During the last decade, many of the nation's largest law firms have converted from single-tier to two-tier (or multi-tier) partnerships. A two-tier firm contains separate tracks for equity and nonequity partner. The equity tier typically controls the firm and enjoys a larger per capita share of the firm's profits. At present, two-tier partnerships make up 80 percent of Am Law 200. The conventional explanation for the growth of the two-tier system (or, conversely, the abandonment of the single-tier) is that it produces higher profits per equity partner (PPP), thus solidifying the prestige of the firm and improving its ...


Lawyering For A Cause And Experiences From Abroad, Jayanth K. Krishnan Jan 2006

Lawyering For A Cause And Experiences From Abroad, Jayanth K. Krishnan

Articles by Maurer Faculty

For more than a decade, there has been a steady growth in what is now commonly referred to as the 'cause lawyering' literature. Partly as a response to those who were critical of the legal profession during the 1970s and 1980s, cause lawyering scholars have sought to rebut these critics' charges, as well as more comprehensively illustrate what, why, and how cause lawyers do what they do. While the critics of cause lawyers on the one hand, and cause lawyering scholars on the other, have made enormous contributions to the debate, only recently has the discourse shifted to examining an ...


Do Attorneys Do Their Clients Justice? An Empirical Study Of Lawyers' Effects On Tax Court Litigation Outcomes, Leandra Lederman, Warren B. Hrung Jan 2006

Do Attorneys Do Their Clients Justice? An Empirical Study Of Lawyers' Effects On Tax Court Litigation Outcomes, Leandra Lederman, Warren B. Hrung

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Do attorneys really add value or can unrepresented parties achieve equivalent results? This fundamental question ordinarily is difficult to answer empirically. An equally important question both for attorneys and the justice system is whether attorneys prolong disputes or instead facilitate expeditious resolution of cases.

Fortunately, there is a federal court that provides an excellent laboratory in which to test and answer these questions. In the United States Tax Court (Tax Court), where most federal tax cases are litigated, the government always is represented by Internal Revenue Service attorneys but a large portion of the taxpayer litigants proceed pro se. In ...