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Full-Text Articles in Law

Lost In Translation: The Economic Analysis Of Law In The United States And Europe, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Carmen L. Brun Jan 2006

Lost In Translation: The Economic Analysis Of Law In The United States And Europe, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Carmen L. Brun

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this Essay, we examine the reasons why the economic analysis of law has not flourished in European countries as it has in the United States. In particular, we focus on three European countries-the United Kingdom, Germany, and France. We argue that differences in culture, the legal system, and the academy have led to differing degrees of success of the law and economics movement in each country. We speculate that, although there is currently less interest in the economic analysis of the law in Europe than in the United States, European interest could dramatically increase if scholars adopt more communitarian ...


Law, Markets And Democracy: A Role For Law In The Neo-Liberal State, Alfred C. Aman Jan 2006

Law, Markets And Democracy: A Role For Law In The Neo-Liberal State, Alfred C. Aman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Especially after 1980, our belief in and our use of law to solve societal problems seemed to decline precipitously, well beyond the ebb and flow of political trends and tastes. Beginning in earnest in the 1980s, political discourse increasingly treated law and markets primarily in binary terms. You could have one or the other, but not both. More law meant less markets and vice versa. When it came to choosing between law or markets, the tide clearly had shifted. If injustices in the 1970s were greeted with the slogan "there ought to be a law", that approach to solving problems ...