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Full-Text Articles in Law

Master Teacher Retires After 37 Years, Colleen Kristl Pauwels Apr 2006

Master Teacher Retires After 37 Years, Colleen Kristl Pauwels

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Anti-Racketeering Legislation In America, Craig M. Bradley Jan 2006

Anti-Racketeering Legislation In America, Craig M. Bradley

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Developments In The Law Concerning Stored Value And Other Prepaid Payment Products, Sarah Jane Hughes, Stephen T. Middlebrook, Broox W. Peterson Jan 2006

Developments In The Law Concerning Stored Value And Other Prepaid Payment Products, Sarah Jane Hughes, Stephen T. Middlebrook, Broox W. Peterson

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Ethics Of Child Custody Evaluation: Advocacy, Respect For Parents, And The Right To An Open Future, Aviva A. Orenstein Jan 2006

The Ethics Of Child Custody Evaluation: Advocacy, Respect For Parents, And The Right To An Open Future, Aviva A. Orenstein

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Guy-Uriel E. Charles Jan 2006

Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Guy-Uriel E. Charles

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Recognizing Odysseus' Scar: Reconceptualizing Pain And Its Empathic Role In Civil Adjudication, Jody L. Madeira Jan 2006

Recognizing Odysseus' Scar: Reconceptualizing Pain And Its Empathic Role In Civil Adjudication, Jody L. Madeira

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This Article proffers a consideration of how the expression of pain impacts the interpersonal dimensions of personal injury proceedings, contesting through philosophical logic and textual analyses of case law and legal practitioners' texts the conclusion of scholars such as Elaine Scarry and Robert Cover that pain unmakes both the word and the world. Seeing pain as something that can and must be communicated, albeit in a different form than pain embodied, makes pain a much more profound force, comports with our understanding of pain as a physical yet interpersonally meaningful sensation, and has many evidentiary ramifications. Taking as its premise ...


Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A Golden Parachute, Ryan W. Scott, David R. Stras Jan 2006

Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A Golden Parachute, Ryan W. Scott, David R. Stras

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The first vacancies on the Supreme Court in eleven years have sparked renewed debate about the continued viability of life tenure for federal judges. Scholars have decried life tenure as one of the Framers' worst blunders, pointing to issues such as strategic retirement, longer average tenure, and widespread mental infirmity of justices. In this Article, the authors argue that, notwithstanding the serious problem of mental and physical infirmity on the Court, life tenure should be retained. They also argue that recent statutory proposals to eliminate or undermine life tenure, for example through a mandatory retirement age or term limits, are ...


Law, Markets And Democracy: A Role For Law In The Neo-Liberal State, Alfred C. Aman Jan 2006

Law, Markets And Democracy: A Role For Law In The Neo-Liberal State, Alfred C. Aman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Especially after 1980, our belief in and our use of law to solve societal problems seemed to decline precipitously, well beyond the ebb and flow of political trends and tastes. Beginning in earnest in the 1980s, political discourse increasingly treated law and markets primarily in binary terms. You could have one or the other, but not both. More law meant less markets and vice versa. When it came to choosing between law or markets, the tide clearly had shifted. If injustices in the 1970s were greeted with the slogan "there ought to be a law", that approach to solving problems ...


Why Kelo Is Not Good News For Local Planners And Developers, Daniel H. Cole Jan 2006

Why Kelo Is Not Good News For Local Planners And Developers, Daniel H. Cole

Articles by Maurer Faculty

When the Supreme Court announced its 2005 decision in Kelo v. City of New London, few legal scholars were surprised at the outcome, which was premised on precedents extending back to the middle of the 19th century. Legal scholars were surprised, however, by the intense political reaction to Kelo (fueled substantially by Justice O'Connor's hyperbolic dissent), as property-rights advocates, legislators (at all levels of government), and media pundits assailed the ruling as a death knell for private property rights in America.

Kelo's combination of relative legal insignificance and high political salience makes it an interesting case study ...


Sovereignty, Not Due Process: Personal Jurisdiction Over Nonresident, Alien Defendants, Austen L. Parrish Jan 2006

Sovereignty, Not Due Process: Personal Jurisdiction Over Nonresident, Alien Defendants, Austen L. Parrish

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The Due Process Clause with its focus on a defendant's liberty interest has become the key, if not only, limitation on a court's exercise of personal jurisdiction. This due process jurisdictional limitation is universally assumed to apply with equal force to alien defendants as to domestic defendants. With few exceptions, scholars do not distinguish between the two. Neither do the courts. Countless cases assume that foreigners have all the rights of United States citizens to object to extraterritorial assertions of personal jurisdiction.

But is this assumption sound? This Article explores the uncritical assumption that the same due process ...


Health And Foreign Policy, David P. Fidler, Nick Drager Jan 2006

Health And Foreign Policy, David P. Fidler, Nick Drager

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Do Attorneys Do Their Clients Justice? An Empirical Study Of Lawyers' Effects On Tax Court Litigation Outcomes, Leandra Lederman, Warren B. Hrung Jan 2006

Do Attorneys Do Their Clients Justice? An Empirical Study Of Lawyers' Effects On Tax Court Litigation Outcomes, Leandra Lederman, Warren B. Hrung

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Do attorneys really add value or can unrepresented parties achieve equivalent results? This fundamental question ordinarily is difficult to answer empirically. An equally important question both for attorneys and the justice system is whether attorneys prolong disputes or instead facilitate expeditious resolution of cases.

Fortunately, there is a federal court that provides an excellent laboratory in which to test and answer these questions. In the United States Tax Court (Tax Court), where most federal tax cases are litigated, the government always is represented by Internal Revenue Service attorneys but a large portion of the taxpayer litigants proceed pro se. In ...


Cybertrespass And Trespass To Documents, Kevin Emerson Collins Jan 2006

Cybertrespass And Trespass To Documents, Kevin Emerson Collins

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Process Paradigm: Rethinking Medical Malpractice, Roger B. Dworkin Jan 2006

The Process Paradigm: Rethinking Medical Malpractice, Roger B. Dworkin

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Impact Of Open Source On Preinvention Assignment Contracts, Michael Mattioli Jan 2006

The Impact Of Open Source On Preinvention Assignment Contracts, Michael Mattioli

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This comment studies the implications of open source on pre-invention assignment agreements. Part I analyzes the basis for past enforcement of these contracts, with an eye toward distinctions between open source projects and more traditional commercial endeavors. Part II briefly reviews the history of patents and explores constitutional and contract-based arguments against the pre-invention assignment. Part III begins with a discussion of open source and then explores how this new phenomenon perfectly fulfills the goals behind the Patent Act. With these addressed, the central inquiry of pre-invention assignment agreements, as they could conflict with open source inventions, will be addressed ...


Opening Our Classrooms Effectively To Foreign Graduate Students, Lauren K. Robel Jan 2006

Opening Our Classrooms Effectively To Foreign Graduate Students, Lauren K. Robel

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court's Role In The Growing School Choice Movement, Kevin D. Brown Jan 2006

The Supreme Court's Role In The Growing School Choice Movement, Kevin D. Brown

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The expansion of school choice in elementary and secondary education, particularly in urban areas, is one of largest current educational reform movements sweeping the nation. This is true despite the fact that it is still too early for a consensus to develop about the educational benefits of increased choice. 1 Society always precedes schooling. Thus, major educational reforms pass in and out of favor depending on social conditions and how prevailing patterns of understanding interpret those conditions.2 Among the most significant social developments influencing educational reforms are legal decisions. Since the Supreme Court is the final authority on constitutional ...


Three Theories Of Substantive Due Process, Daniel O. Conkle Jan 2006

Three Theories Of Substantive Due Process, Daniel O. Conkle

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Substantive due process is in serious disarray, with the Supreme Court simultaneously embracing two, and perhaps three, competing and inconsistent theories of decisionmaking. The first two theories, historical tradition and reasoned judgment, have explicit and continuing support in the Court's decisions. Under the theory of historical tradition, substantive due process affords presumptive constitutional protection only to liberties that are "deeply rooted in this Nation's history and tradition." By contrast, the theory of reasoned judgment is far more expansive, permitting the Court to identify rights independently, through a process that amounts to philosophical analysis or political-moral reasoning. The third ...


Habitat Federalism, Robert L. Fischman Jan 2006

Habitat Federalism, Robert L. Fischman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

THE COMMON IMAGE OF COOPERATIVE FEDERALISM INVOLVES the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inducing states to adopt permit and other pollution abatement programs. States can tailor some standards, but public health benchmarks and end-of-the-pipe technologies are uniform across the nation. Inducements include both carrots, mostly in the form of federal funds and flexibility, and sticks, mostly in the form of penalties and loss of control.

This essay discusses cooperative federalism for habitat conservation. Habitat federalism focuses more on ecology than chemistry, more on cities and counties than states, and more on place-based variation than on uniform standards. It is about how ...


Regulating The Mutual Fund Industry, Donna M. Nagy Jan 2006

Regulating The Mutual Fund Industry, Donna M. Nagy

Articles by Maurer Faculty

With virtually every other household in the United States invested in mutual funds, effective and efficient regulation of the mutual fund industry must be a top national priority. But the creation of a new private regulator - whether along the lines of SROs such as the NASD and NYSE or the recently created PCAOB - would be a step in the wrong direction. Instead, much more can be gained from strengthening the SEC's longstanding role as the principal overseer of mutual funds and improving other aspects of the existing regulatory regime.


The Federal Income Tax Consequences Of The Bobble Supreme Phenomenon, Leandra Lederman Jan 2006

The Federal Income Tax Consequences Of The Bobble Supreme Phenomenon, Leandra Lederman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Since 2003, the Green Bag Journal has been commissioning and distributing limited edition bobblehead likenesses of the Justices of the United States Supreme Court. Demand for the bobble Supremes has not been limited to existing recipients, and bobble longing has inspired purchases and even poetry. Given the importance of the bobble Supreme phenomenon to the national economy, the time has come for guidance on the tax consequences of their receipt, ownership, and transfer. Fortunately, draft proposed regulations on the federal income tax treatment of bobble Supremes recently surfaced. Although the regulations have not and never will be officially sanctioned (and ...


Calibrating The Wealth And Health Of Nations: Trade, Health, And Foreign Policy After The Wto's First Decade, David P. Fidler Jan 2006

Calibrating The Wealth And Health Of Nations: Trade, Health, And Foreign Policy After The Wto's First Decade, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

One of the most important themes to emerge from the relationship between trade and health in the first ten year's of the WTO's existence is the challenge of achieving policy coherence. This task is a foreign policy challenge for WTO Members, which requires looking at the relationship between trade and health against the backdrop of the making and implementing of foreign policy. Policy coherence has generally become a major concern for foreign policymakers because post-Cold War trends, such as accelerating globalization, seriously challenge traditional foreign policy assumptions, practices, and institutions. Part of this new context for foreign policy ...


Indiana Law In Evolution, Yvonne Cripps Jan 2006

Indiana Law In Evolution, Yvonne Cripps

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Lawyering For A Cause And Experiences From Abroad, Jayanth K. Krishnan Jan 2006

Lawyering For A Cause And Experiences From Abroad, Jayanth K. Krishnan

Articles by Maurer Faculty

For more than a decade, there has been a steady growth in what is now commonly referred to as the 'cause lawyering' literature. Partly as a response to those who were critical of the legal profession during the 1970s and 1980s, cause lawyering scholars have sought to rebut these critics' charges, as well as more comprehensively illustrate what, why, and how cause lawyers do what they do. While the critics of cause lawyers on the one hand, and cause lawyering scholars on the other, have made enormous contributions to the debate, only recently has the discourse shifted to examining an ...


Minority Admissions To Law School: More Trouble Ahead, And Two Solutions, Jeffrey E. Stake Jan 2006

Minority Admissions To Law School: More Trouble Ahead, And Two Solutions, Jeffrey E. Stake

Articles by Maurer Faculty

U.S. News and World Report (USNAWR) rankings have created incentives that have changed law school admissions. The rankings pressure schools to admit applicants with high numbers rather than those who would do the most to improve the admitting law school or the bar to which it sends its graduates. Much attention has already been paid to decreased minority admissions stemming from increased weight on the LSAT. The shoe that has not dropped, but will soon fall, is the undergraduate grade point average (UGPA). When law schools give this the attention that USNAWR mandates, the diversity of law school classes ...


A Brief Comment On Trust Protectors, Jeffrey E. Stake Jan 2006

A Brief Comment On Trust Protectors, Jeffrey E. Stake

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Reasonable Policeman: Police Intent In Criminal Procedure, Craig M. Bradley Jan 2006

The Reasonable Policeman: Police Intent In Criminal Procedure, Craig M. Bradley

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Book Review. The Supreme Court And Religion In American Life, Daniel O. Conkle Jan 2006

Book Review. The Supreme Court And Religion In American Life, Daniel O. Conkle

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Lost In Translation: The Economic Analysis Of Law In The United States And Europe, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Carmen L. Brun Jan 2006

Lost In Translation: The Economic Analysis Of Law In The United States And Europe, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Carmen L. Brun

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this Essay, we examine the reasons why the economic analysis of law has not flourished in European countries as it has in the United States. In particular, we focus on three European countries-the United Kingdom, Germany, and France. We argue that differences in culture, the legal system, and the academy have led to differing degrees of success of the law and economics movement in each country. We speculate that, although there is currently less interest in the economic analysis of the law in Europe than in the United States, European interest could dramatically increase if scholars adopt more communitarian ...


Rescuing Judicial Accountability From The Realm Of Political Rhetoric, Charles G. Geyh Jan 2006

Rescuing Judicial Accountability From The Realm Of Political Rhetoric, Charles G. Geyh

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The article examines the threat to judicial independence from political calls for more judicial accountability. The author begins by defining judicial accountability and discussing its purposes before breaking the concept down into three categories: institutional accountability, behavioral accountability, and decisional accountability. This process reveals that in the judicial accountability family, there is but one discrete sub-species, situated in the decisional accountability genus, that does not further accountability's proper purpose and is therefore conceptually problematic: direct political accountability for competent and honest judicial decision-making error that the politicians desire and a serious threat to judicial independence. The critical question becomes ...