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How Antidiscrimination Law Learned To Live With Racial Inequality, Matthew Lindsay Oct 2006

How Antidiscrimination Law Learned To Live With Racial Inequality, Matthew Lindsay

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This Article explores a great paradox at the heart of the prevailing paradigm of American antidiscrimination law: the colorblindness ideal. In theory, and often in practice, that ideal is animated by a genuine commitment to liberal, individualist, race-neutral egalitarianism. For many of its partisans, colorblindness entails not only a negative injunction against race-conscious decisionmaking, but also, crucially, an affirmative program for the achievement of true racial equality. For these proponents, scrupulously race-neutral decisionmaking both advances the interests of racial minorities and embodies the best aspirations of the civil rights movement. In this worldview, colorblindness offers the only true antidote for ...


Book Review (Reviewing Petros C. Mavroidis & Alan O. Sykes, The Wto And International Trade Law: Dispute Settlement (2005)), Sungjoon Cho Sep 2006

Book Review (Reviewing Petros C. Mavroidis & Alan O. Sykes, The Wto And International Trade Law: Dispute Settlement (2005)), Sungjoon Cho

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Professors Petros Mavroidis and Alan Sykes have produced a dependable compendium on the WTO dispute settlement system. The book consists of six parts corresponding to six critical issues in the field; namely: (1) the function of the WTO dispute settlement system, (2) the standard of review, (3) remedies, (4) participation, (5) unilateral enforcement, and (6) governance. In each part, they carefully selected representative and informative articles which offer readers perspectives that are essential to comprehend this salient and discrete disciplinary area in the study of the WTO. Notwithstanding a few weaknesses, such as limited descriptions of the “dynamic” development of ...


Can Appropriation Riders Speed Our Exit From Iraq?, Charles Tiefer Jul 2006

Can Appropriation Riders Speed Our Exit From Iraq?, Charles Tiefer

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To explore the implications of riders - provisions added to appropriation bills that "ride" on the underlying bill - on the United States' continued military force in Iraq, the author draws three hypotheticals, each focusing on the debate surrounding the policy and political disputes raised by the use of such riders. A "withdrawal" rider, which would authorize funding only if there exists a plan to withdraw American ground troops by a set deadline, remains the most important - and controversial - rider. Riders may also significantly affect wartime policies, like those that limit the President's use of reservists in combat so as to ...


The Business Of Employing People With Disabilities: Four Case Studies, Alexander A. Boni-Saenz, Allen W. Heinemann, Deborah S. Crown, Linda L. Emanuel Jun 2006

The Business Of Employing People With Disabilities: Four Case Studies, Alexander A. Boni-Saenz, Allen W. Heinemann, Deborah S. Crown, Linda L. Emanuel

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This exploratory study examines employer attitudes towards people with disabilities in the labor market. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with senior management, human resources staff, directors of diversity, and hiring managers at four corporations, it pinpoints reasons why businesses chose to hire people with disabilities, investigates the perceived benefits and barriers to hiring people with disabilities, and identifies strategies for successfully hiring and retaining workers with disabilities. It fills a gap in examining the attitudes and decision-making processes of U.S. companies that have been leaders in hiring people with disabilities, as well as delving into the special issues of small ...


Patents On Human Genes: An Analysis Of Scope And Claims, Lori B. Andrews, Jordan K. Paradise, Timothy R. Holbrooke Apr 2006

Patents On Human Genes: An Analysis Of Scope And Claims, Lori B. Andrews, Jordan K. Paradise, Timothy R. Holbrooke

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There is significant domestic and international opposition to gene patents based on the fact that gene patents deter medical research and health care, as well as the policy position that genes are an inherent product of nature. Yet, equally troubling is the fact that gene patents have been issued by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office that are problematic with respect to existing federal patent law. The authors of this Policy Forum describe their study, which examined issued gene patents covering a variety of genetic diseases and described ways in which many claims fell short of USPTO patentability requirements.


Reflections On Standing: Challenges To Searches And Seizures In A High Technology World, José F. Anderson Apr 2006

Reflections On Standing: Challenges To Searches And Seizures In A High Technology World, José F. Anderson

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Among the profound issues that surround constitutional criminal procedure is the obscure often overlooked issue of who has standing to challenge an illegal search, seizure or confession. Privacy interests are often overlooked because without a legal status that allows a person to complain in court, there is no way to challenge whether one is constitutionally protected from personal invasions. Standing is that procedural barrier often imposed to prevent a person in a case from objecting to improper police conduct because of his or her relationship of ownership, proximity, location, or interest in an item searched or a thing seized. Although ...


Reforming The Branch Profits Tax To Advance Neutrality, Fred B. Brown Apr 2006

Reforming The Branch Profits Tax To Advance Neutrality, Fred B. Brown

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Congress enacted the branch profits tax in order to reduce the disparity between the taxation of U.S. subsidiaries and U.S. branches of foreign corporations. The branch profits tax attempts to promote neutrality by subjecting the U.S. branch earnings of a foreign corporation to a second level of U.S. tax upon the deemed remittance of the earnings outside of the U.S. branch. This is to approximate the second-level tax that occurs in the subsidiary setting when a U.S. subsidiary pays dividends to its foreign parent. Unlike the dividend tax in the subsidiary setting, however, the ...


Five Myths About Antitrust Damages, Robert H. Lande Apr 2006

Five Myths About Antitrust Damages, Robert H. Lande

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This article examines five common beliefs about antitrust damages and shows they all are untrue.

Myth #1. Antitrust violations give rise to treble damages.

Myth #2. There is "duplication" of antitrust damages because many defendants pay six-fold or more damages.

Myth #3. Courts should go easy on defendants when formulating liability rules or calculating overcharges because the awarded damages from a finding of an antitrust violation are so severe.

Myth #4. The size of the harms caused by antitrust violations, even by such "hardcore" violations as naked cartels, is relatively modest, and criminal penalties resulting from violations are out of ...


The Attorney As Advocate And Witness: Does The Prohibition Of An Attorney Acting As Advocate And Witness At A Judicial Trial Also Apply In Administrative Adjudications, Arnold Rochvarg Apr 2006

The Attorney As Advocate And Witness: Does The Prohibition Of An Attorney Acting As Advocate And Witness At A Judicial Trial Also Apply In Administrative Adjudications, Arnold Rochvarg

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In every state, the professional rules of conduct contain a prohibition on an attorney acting as both an advocate for their client and a witness in the same trial. The "lawyer as witness" rule has, however, been inconsistently applied in administrative adjudications. This article analyzes the split of authority in the use of this rule and proposes a solution as how the issue should be resolved.

Ample support for applying the lawyer as witness rule to administrative adjudications may be found in administrative decisions, judicial opinions and state bar association ethics committee opinions. There is, however, conflicting authority that rejects ...


Wrongful Discharge: The Use Of Federal Law As A Source Of Public Policy, Nancy M. Modesitt Apr 2006

Wrongful Discharge: The Use Of Federal Law As A Source Of Public Policy, Nancy M. Modesitt

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Wrongful discharge in violation of public policy circumscribes the employment at-will doctrine by prohibiting employers from firing employees who engage in conduct that is deemed to be protected by state or federal public policy. While much has been written about the pros and cons of such wrongful discharge claims, to date no scholarship has focused on the problems that arise when the source of public policy is a federal rather than state statute. This article analyzes the historical and current approaches to the use of federal statutes as a source of public policy to protect employees against discharge, concluding that ...


Why The Defense Of Marriage Act Is Not (Yet?) Unconstitutional: Lawrence, Full Faith And Credit, And The Many Societal Actors That Determine What The Constitution Requires, Mark D. Rosen Mar 2006

Why The Defense Of Marriage Act Is Not (Yet?) Unconstitutional: Lawrence, Full Faith And Credit, And The Many Societal Actors That Determine What The Constitution Requires, Mark D. Rosen

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This Article argues that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is not unconstitutional - at least not yet. DOMA provides that States need not recognize same-sex marriages (or judgments in connection with such marriages) performed in sister States. The Article first shows that the Supreme Court's recent opinion in Lawrence v. Texas, which struck down as unconstitutional state laws that criminalized sodomy, has not invalidated the DOMA. Lawrence is best understood as having left undecided the constitutional status of same-sex marriage, and the Article explains the benefits of the Court's having held back its constitutional judgment on this subject ...


Prenuptial Agreements: A New Reason To Revive An Old Rule, Jeffrey G. Sherman Mar 2006

Prenuptial Agreements: A New Reason To Revive An Old Rule, Jeffrey G. Sherman

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No abstract provided.


Five Views Of The Great Lakes And Why They Might Matter, A. Dan Tarlock Mar 2006

Five Views Of The Great Lakes And Why They Might Matter, A. Dan Tarlock

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No abstract provided.


Western Growth And Sustainable Water Use: If There Are No "Natural Limits" Should We Worry About Water Supplies? (With S. Van De Wetering), A. Dan Tarlock Mar 2006

Western Growth And Sustainable Water Use: If There Are No "Natural Limits" Should We Worry About Water Supplies? (With S. Van De Wetering), A. Dan Tarlock

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law And The Fabric Of The Everyday: Settlement Houses, Sociological Jurisprudence, And The Gendering Of Urban Legal Culture, Felice J. Batlan Feb 2006

Law And The Fabric Of The Everyday: Settlement Houses, Sociological Jurisprudence, And The Gendering Of Urban Legal Culture, Felice J. Batlan

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No abstract provided.


Compensating Power: An Analysis Of Rents And Rewards In The Mutual Fund Industry, William A. Birdthistle Feb 2006

Compensating Power: An Analysis Of Rents And Rewards In The Mutual Fund Industry, William A. Birdthistle

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The allegations of malfeasance in the investment management industry - market timing, late trading, revenue sharing, and several others - involve a broad range of mutual fund operations. This Article seeks to explain the common source of these irregularities by focusing upon a trait they share: the practice of investment advisers' capitalizing upon their managerial influence to increase assets under management in order to generate greater fees from those assets. This Article extends theories of executive compensation into the context of investment management to understand the extraction of rents by mutual fund advisers. Investment advisers, as collective groups of portfolio managers, interact ...


Wto’S Identity Crisis (Reviewing Joost Pauwelyn, Conflict Of Norms In Public International Law: How Wto Law Relates To Other Rules Of International Law (2003)), Sungjoon Cho Feb 2006

Wto’S Identity Crisis (Reviewing Joost Pauwelyn, Conflict Of Norms In Public International Law: How Wto Law Relates To Other Rules Of International Law (2003)), Sungjoon Cho

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Joost Pauwelyn has written an extensive and thought-provoking treatise on the interaction of norms in public international law (PIL), in particular between norms of World Trade Organization (WTO) and non-WTO norms, through a conceptual lens of “conflict.” His main argument is non-WTO norms should be able to “trump” WTO norms under certain circumstances. After framing the concept of norm conflict in PIL (Chapter 1), and defining the nature of WTO law (“reciprocal” obligations) vis-à-vis that of other branches of PIL such as human rights and international environmental law (“integral” obligations) (Chapter 2), the book unfolds its conflict thesis, including hierarchy ...


Defragmenting World Trade, Sungjoon Cho Feb 2006

Defragmenting World Trade, Sungjoon Cho

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This article argues that unchecked multiplication of regional trading blocs seriously fragments world trade, and simultaneously debilitates the multilateral trading system. It endeavors to overcome some of shortcomings of existing literature in this field, such as sector-specific approach and concentration on economic analysis. It attempts to offer holistic, normative diagnosis and prescription anchored by the trade, regulatory, and development objective of the global trading system represented by the WTO. From such a telic standpoint, the article highlights teleological failures caused by regionalist fragmentation and proposes both institutional and judicial means to defragment world trade. The article warns that such regionalist ...


The Lamentable Notion Of Indefeasible Presidential Powers: A Reply To Professor Prakash, Harold J. Krent Feb 2006

The Lamentable Notion Of Indefeasible Presidential Powers: A Reply To Professor Prakash, Harold J. Krent

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Introduction To Secrecy In Litigation (Symposium Editor), Nancy S. Marder Feb 2006

Introduction To Secrecy In Litigation (Symposium Editor), Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Justice Stevens, The Peremptory Challenge, And The Jury (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder Feb 2006

Justice Stevens, The Peremptory Challenge, And The Jury (Symposium), Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Cyberjuries: A New Role As Online Mock Juries, Nancy S. Marder Feb 2006

Cyberjuries: A New Role As Online Mock Juries, Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Education For The People Themselves, Sheldon Nahmod Feb 2006

Constitutional Education For The People Themselves, Sheldon Nahmod

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Kramer's Popular Constitutionalism: A Quick Normative Assessment, Sarah K. Harding Feb 2006

Kramer's Popular Constitutionalism: A Quick Normative Assessment, Sarah K. Harding

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Bringing Jury Instructions Into The Twenty-First Century, Nancy S. Marder Feb 2006

Bringing Jury Instructions Into The Twenty-First Century, Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Land Titling: A Mode Of Privatization With The Potential To Deepen Democracy, Bernadette Atuahene Feb 2006

Land Titling: A Mode Of Privatization With The Potential To Deepen Democracy, Bernadette Atuahene

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Land titling is a form of privatization in that public assets are transferred to private families and individuals. This is unlike other forms of privatization, however, because there is a systematic diffusion of economic and decision making power down to indigent populations rather than out of the country or up to its local elites. In light of this uniqueness, the question I will grapple with in this Article is, can property ownership, achieved through land titling programs, bolster democracy? First, using Peru as an example, I explain the context that necessitated the creation of land titling and the process by ...


Protecting Children By Preserving Parenthood, Jane C. Murphy Feb 2006

Protecting Children By Preserving Parenthood, Jane C. Murphy

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Establishing legal parentage, once a relatively straightforward matter of marriage and biology, has become increasingly complex. The determination of legal status as mother may now involve several women making claims based on genetic contribution, contract, status as gestational carrier or other bases. The debate about the best choice for children when adults are competing for parental status is ongoing, lively and filled with many voices. Less attention has been paid to a much larger, second category of cases - cases in which the law is faced with resolving the legal status of the one adult who may be available to serve ...


Foster Children Paying For Foster Care, Daniel L. Hatcher Feb 2006

Foster Children Paying For Foster Care, Daniel L. Hatcher

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This Article examines the legality and policy concerns of state foster care agencies using children's Social Security benefits as a state funding stream. The practice requires foster children who are disabled or have deceased or disabled parents to pay for their own care. Often with the assistance of private consultants under contingency fee contracts, agencies look for children who are eligible for Social Security benefits and interject themselves as the children's representative payees. Rather than using the benefits to serve the children's unmet needs, the agencies use their fiduciary power to access the children's benefits and ...


The "Modernisation" Of European Community Competition Law: Achieving Consistency In Enforcement-Part Ii (With P. Cassinis), David J. Gerber Jan 2006

The "Modernisation" Of European Community Competition Law: Achieving Consistency In Enforcement-Part Ii (With P. Cassinis), David J. Gerber

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No abstract provided.


The Limits Of The Olympian Court: Common Law Judging Versus Error Correction In The Supreme Court, Carolyn Shapiro Jan 2006

The Limits Of The Olympian Court: Common Law Judging Versus Error Correction In The Supreme Court, Carolyn Shapiro

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Throughout its history, the Supreme Court has struggled to control its caseload and to avoid becoming a court of error correction. Instead, it applies its resources to matters of particular national importance and to promoting uniformity in the law. This Article argues that the Court's approach to maintaining uniformity fails to provide adequate guidance to the lower courts. The Court focuses on resolving disagreements among the lower courts over what rules and standards to apply. But the Court largely ignores the question of whether those directives are applied in a consistent or predictable way. As a result, there are ...