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Oy Canada! Trade's Non-Solution To "The Problem" Of U.S. Drug Prices, Daniel Gilman Aug 2006

Oy Canada! Trade's Non-Solution To "The Problem" Of U.S. Drug Prices, Daniel Gilman

Faculty Scholarship

Price disparities—price “differentiation” or “discrimination”—in pharmaceuticals markets have, in recent years, been the subject of much discussion. Price sensitivity should come as no surprise: Medicines play an increasingly important role in healthcare, while pharmaceuticals prices continue to rise. When prices vary greatly within markets or between neighboring markets, the pressure towards arbitrage is clear. This paper considers the question whether the re-importation of medicines from Canada or the EU is well advised and argues that it is not. First, we might reasonably question the extent to which we wish, as a matter of policy, to manage pharmaceuticals pricing ...


Taxpayer Standing And Daimlerchrysler V. Cuno: Where Do We Go From Here?, Kristin E. Hickman, Donald B. Tobin Feb 2006

Taxpayer Standing And Daimlerchrysler V. Cuno: Where Do We Go From Here?, Kristin E. Hickman, Donald B. Tobin

Faculty Scholarship

In granting certiorari in the case of Daimler-Chrysler Corp. v. Cuno, the Supreme Court asked the parties to brief "whether respondents have standing to challenge Ohio's investment tax credit." This report applies modern standing doctrine to the Cuno case and concludes that the Cuno plaintiffs do no have standing to raise their claims in federal court. Moreover, the authors write, allowing the Cuno plaintiffs' case to be resolved in federal court would open the federal court system to a wide range of taxpayer challenges better left to the political branches of government. Nevertheless, they recognize that there may be ...


The New Commerce Clause Doctrine In Game Theoretical Perspective, Maxwell L. Stearns Jan 2006

The New Commerce Clause Doctrine In Game Theoretical Perspective, Maxwell L. Stearns

Faculty Scholarship

The Roberts Court emerges at a critical juncture in the development of Commerce Clause doctrine. While the Commerce Clause doctrine implicates concerns for federalism and separation of powers, both of which are rooted in the earliest part of our constitutional history, the new Court presents an ideal opportunity to critically assess existing doctrines and to develop new analytical paradigms. The Rehnquist Court succeeded for the first time in sixty years in imposing substantive limits on the scope of this important source of Congressional power. That Court proved far less successful, however, in developing a coherent normative theory that reconciles the ...