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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Law

Conditional Love: Incentive Trusts And The Inflexibility Problem, Joshua C. Tate Jan 2006

Conditional Love: Incentive Trusts And The Inflexibility Problem, Joshua C. Tate

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the contemporary phenomenon of incentive trusts: trusts that use money to encourage or discourage certain behaviors. Using evidence from Internet websites, practitioner articles, and newspaper articles, the Article considers the likely provisions that a typical incentive trust might have, and explains how such trusts might lead to a problem of inflexibility when they are not drafted so as to take into account the possibility of changed circumstances. The Article also examines current law regarding trust modification and termination as well as recent reform proposals, and suggests some alternatives that might better take into account the particular characteristics ...


Cheating The Constitution, Pamela R. Metzger Jan 2006

Cheating The Constitution, Pamela R. Metzger

Faculty Scholarship

It is black letter constitutional law: To prove a criminal offense, the prosecution must prove every element of the offense, by proof beyond a reasonable doubt, and the constitution entitles a defendant to confront and cross-examine all witnesses against him. Yet, for the past thirty years, state legislatures have quietly approved laws that cheat the constitution. By that, I mean that these laws fly, undetected, beneath the constitutional radar while violating fundamental constitutional rights.

Although other constitutional cheats abound, in this article I consider one archetypical cheat: statutes that permit state prosecutors to use hearsay state crime laboratory reports, in ...


Just Say 'No Fishing': The Lure Of Metaphor, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 2006

Just Say 'No Fishing': The Lure Of Metaphor, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Scholarship

The phrase "fishing expedition" is widely used in popular culture and in the law. In the case of metaphorical "fishing" in the law, reliance on the metaphor can act as a substitute for rigorous analysis, disguising the factors that influence a result. When used by the court, it is uninformative. Worse, the fishing metaphor may itself shape the way the court thinks about the kind of issue or claim involved. Accusations of "fishing" also affect the language and position of the litigants. Parties arguing against pleadings or discovery use the metaphor as a rhetorical weapon, stigmatizing their opponents, instead of ...


The Food And Drug Administration's Evolving Regulation Of Press Releases: Limits And Challenges, William W. Vodra, Nathan Cortez, David E. Korn Jan 2006

The Food And Drug Administration's Evolving Regulation Of Press Releases: Limits And Challenges, William W. Vodra, Nathan Cortez, David E. Korn

Faculty Scholarship

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed an informal framework for regulating press releases by drug and medical device companies. FDA asserted jurisdiction over press releases based on its authority over labeling and advertising, and over the past 20 years, the agency has both broadened and scaled back its claims to authority over press statements.

Despite a somewhat predictable framework for anticipating how FDA regulates press materials, the agency's approach appears to be in flux. FDA will not tolerate false or misleading statements in press materials, but there are legal and practical limits to its regulation in this ...


Insider Trading, Marc I. Steinberg, William K.S. Wang Jan 2006

Insider Trading, Marc I. Steinberg, William K.S. Wang

Faculty Scholarship

This paper is the Introductory chapter to Insider Trading (PLI 2d ed. 2006). Insider Trading is a two-volume treatise that analyzes the application of various laws to stock market insider trading and tipping. Among the federal laws are Exchange Act section 10(b), SEC rule 10b-5, mail/wire fraud, SEC rule 14e-3, Exchange Act section 16, and Securities Act section 17(a). The state laws discussed are the common law, the Uniform Securities Act, and the California and New York securities statutes.

Another chapter addresses government enforcement of the insider trading/tipping prohibitions. A chapter on compliance programs deals with ...


Judicial Participation In Plea Negotiations: A Comparative View, Jenia I. Turner Jan 2006

Judicial Participation In Plea Negotiations: A Comparative View, Jenia I. Turner

Faculty Scholarship

Current rules in most U.S. jurisdictions prohibit judges from becoming involved in plea negotiations and limit the judges' role to reviewing a plea bargain once it is presented by the parties. The enclosed article surveys three systems that provide for more significant judicial involvement - Germany, Florida, and Connecticut - and suggests that a judge's early input into plea negotiations can render the final disposition more accurate and procedurally just. Based on interviews with practitioners and a review of the case law, the article outlines a model for greater judicial involvement in plea negotiations.


The Search For The Rule Of Law In Russia, Jeffrey Kahn Jan 2006

The Search For The Rule Of Law In Russia, Jeffrey Kahn

Faculty Scholarship

There exists broad consensus in political science that the rule of law is as essential to a consolidated modern democracy as electoral politics or a robust civil society. Paradoxically, however, the rule of law as an institution has not been subjected to nearly the same rigorous study as those other popular variables. Although frequently used, the term is rarely defined. Political scientists declare the general importance of the rule of law, but reduce their focus to the "rules of the game" for political elites and the adoption of select laws and judicial institutions. Frequently, an instrumentalist metaphor is deployed: the ...


Family Boundaries: Third-Party Rights And Obligations With Respect To Children, Joanna L. Grossman Jan 2006

Family Boundaries: Third-Party Rights And Obligations With Respect To Children, Joanna L. Grossman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Designer Trials, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 2006

Designer Trials, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Scholarship

This article considers the intersection of freedom of contract and the trials that have not vanished. Could contracting parties effectively agree in advance of a dispute that any litigation of the case will comply with certain rules? Would such an agreement be enforced even in a contract of adhesion? If so, parties with sufficient bargaining leverage could design away many of the characteristics of litigation that they find unappealing, without the need to resort to private processes. The result: a designer trial with the procedural deck stacked in favor of the party with the greatest pre-dispute bargaining power.

Such a ...


The Legal Limits Of Universal Jurisdiction, Anthony J. Colangelo Jan 2006

The Legal Limits Of Universal Jurisdiction, Anthony J. Colangelo

Faculty Scholarship

Despite all the attention it receives from both its supporters and critics, universal jurisdiction remains one of the more confused doctrines of international law. Indeed, while commentary has focused largely and unevenly on policy and normative arguments either favoring or undercutting the desirability of its exercise, a straightforward legal analysis breaking down critical aspects of this extraordinary form of jurisdiction remains conspicuously missing. Yet universal jurisdiction's increased practice by states calls out for such a clear descriptive understanding. This Essay engages this under-treated area. It offers to explicate a basic, but overlooked, feature of the law of universal jurisdiction ...


Ownership And Possession In The Early Common Law, Joshua C. Tate Jan 2006

Ownership And Possession In The Early Common Law, Joshua C. Tate

Faculty Scholarship

Much has been written on the possible influence of Roman or canon law on the early English common law of property. Maitland thought that the canonist's actio spolii was the inspiration for the assize of novel disseisin. Sutherland argued that the assize borrowed from the Roman interdict unde vi. Milsom, by contrast, thinks that the early common-law writs must be understood within a feudal framework, and that the early common law took nothing from Roman law than the Latin language.

This Article offers a new perspective on ownership and possession in the early common law. It examines the theoretical ...


Unanimously Wrong, Dale Carpenter Jan 2006

Unanimously Wrong, Dale Carpenter

Faculty Scholarship

The Supreme Court was unanimously wrong in Rumsfeld v. FAIR. Though rare, it's not the first time the Court has been unanimously wrong. Its most notorious such decisions have come, like FAIR, in cases where the Court conspicuously failed even to appreciate the importance of the constitutional freedoms under attack from legislative majorities. In these cases, the Court's very rhetoric exposed its myopic vision in ways that now seem embarrassing. Does FAIR, so obviously correct to so many people right now, await the same ignominy decades away? FAIR was wrong in tone, a dismissive vox populi, adopted by ...


Valuation In Cost-Benefit Analysis: Choosing Between Offer Prices And Asking Prices As The Appropriate Measure Of Willingness To Pay, Gregory S. Crespi Jan 2006

Valuation In Cost-Benefit Analysis: Choosing Between Offer Prices And Asking Prices As The Appropriate Measure Of Willingness To Pay, Gregory S. Crespi

Faculty Scholarship

Cost-benefit analysis is a well-known technique for evaluating the merits of a policy by attempting to quantify in financial terms all of the costs and benefits that will result from its implementation. In this article, the author focuses on the important question of whether offer prices or asking prices are the theoretically appropriate measure in determining "willingness to pay" and overall efficiency consequences when conducting a cost-benefit analysis. The author surveys the existing literature on this valuation question and offers personal conclusions and recommendations.


Applying The Laws Of Logic To The Logic Of Laws, Hillel Bavli Jan 2006

Applying The Laws Of Logic To The Logic Of Laws, Hillel Bavli

Faculty Scholarship

The article begins by discussing the difficulties of proving consistency within a formal legal system generally. After establishing the importance of a formalized legal model as a prerequisite of rigorous examination of consistency, it proceeds to investigate issues intrinsic to the current system of law that may prevent formalization of a just legal system as currently conceived. The article argues that flexibility inherent in a just legal system may foreclose the possibility of legal formalization or any comprehensive model thereof. The article concludes, however, that a model whose purpose is the examination of consistency within a system need not necessarily ...