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2006

Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Privacy

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Preplacement Examinations And Job-Relatedness: How To Enhance Privacy And Diminish Discrimination In The Workplace, Sharona Hoffman Mar 2006

Preplacement Examinations And Job-Relatedness: How To Enhance Privacy And Diminish Discrimination In The Workplace, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

Medical testing in the workplace is raising growing concern in light of increasingly available genetic tests and what is perceived as a general assault on individual privacy in the United States. Almost seventy percent of major U.S. firms require individuals who receive job offers to undergo medical testing prior to the commencement of employment, and the law does not restrict the scope of these examinations. Thus, employers test job candidates not only for fitness for duty and use of illegal substances, but also for a variety of conditions including susceptibility to workplace hazards, breast and colon cancer, sexually transmitted ...


User Choices And Regret: Understanding Users' Decision Process About Consensually Acquired Spyware, Nataniel Good, Jens Grossklags, David Thaw, Aaron K. Perzanowski, Deirdre K. Mulligan, Joseph Konstan Jan 2006

User Choices And Regret: Understanding Users' Decision Process About Consensually Acquired Spyware, Nataniel Good, Jens Grossklags, David Thaw, Aaron K. Perzanowski, Deirdre K. Mulligan, Joseph Konstan

Faculty Publications

Spyware is software which monitors user actions, gathers personal data, and/or displays advertisements to users. While some spyware is installed surreptitiously, a surprising amount is installed on users’ computers with their active participation. In some cases, users agree to accept spyware as part of a software bundle as a cost associated with gaining functionality they desire. In many other cases, however, users are unaware that they installed spyware, or of the consequences of that installation. This lack of awareness occurs even when the functioning of the spyware is explicitly declared in the end user license agreement (EULA). We argue ...