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2006

Religion Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Judaism Without Ordinary Law: Toward A Broader View Of Sanctification, Jonathan R. Cohen Oct 2006

Judaism Without Ordinary Law: Toward A Broader View Of Sanctification, Jonathan R. Cohen

UF Law Faculty Publications

With the functional constriction of Jewish law to the ritual, it is easy to relegate Torah and, with it, our sense of sanctification, to the ritual. Such is a great loss. Recognizing sanctification as not only separation but also elevation may help us see the possibility of pursuing sanctification throughout our lives. In other words, the legal constriction produced by history should not become a spiritual one as well.


Social Reproduction And Religious Reproduction: A Democratic-Communitarian Analysis Of The Yoder Problem, Josh Chafetz Oct 2006

Social Reproduction And Religious Reproduction: A Democratic-Communitarian Analysis Of The Yoder Problem, Josh Chafetz

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In 1972, Wisconsin v. Yoder presented the Supreme Court with a sharp clash between the state's interest in social reproduction through education -- that is, society's interest in using the educational system to perpetuate its collective way of life among the next generation -- and the parents' interest in religious reproduction -- that is, their interest in passing their religious beliefs on to their children. This Article will take up the challenge of that clash, a clash which continues to be central to current debates over issues like intelligent design in the classroom. This Article engages with the competing theories put ...


Christianity And The (Modest) Rule Of Law, David A. Skeel Jr., William J. Stuntz Aug 2006

Christianity And The (Modest) Rule Of Law, David A. Skeel Jr., William J. Stuntz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Conservative Christians are often accused, justifiably, of trying to impose their moral views on the rest of the population: of trying to equate God's law with man's law. In this essay, we try to answer the question whether that equation is consistent with Christianity. It isn't. Christian doctrines of creation and the fall imply the basic protections associated with the rule of law. But the moral law as defined in the Sermon on the Mount is flatly inconsistent with those protections. The most plausible inference to draw from those two conclusions is that the moral law - God ...


Evidence On The Relationship Between Takaful Insurance And Fundamental Perception Of Islamic Principles, Ramin Cooper Maysami, John Joseph Williams Aug 2006

Evidence On The Relationship Between Takaful Insurance And Fundamental Perception Of Islamic Principles, Ramin Cooper Maysami, John Joseph Williams

Research Collection School Of Accountancy

One of the complexities overarching the concept of Islamic insurance is anchored in the belief system pertaining to fundamental Islamic Law, while another is embedded in the role of profit within the takaful contract. The purpose of this study is to empirically explore the association between the awareness of the existence of Islamic insurance (takaful) and religious perceptions of this financial service.


Religious Group Autonomy: Further Reflections About What Is At Stake, Kathleen A. Brady Jul 2006

Religious Group Autonomy: Further Reflections About What Is At Stake, Kathleen A. Brady

Working Paper Series

This article addresses the protections afforded by the First Amendment when government regulation interferes with the internal activities or affairs of religious groups. In previous pieces, I have argued that the First Amendment should be construed to provide religious groups a broad right of autonomy over all aspects of internal group operations, those that are clearly religious in nature as well as activities that seem essentially secular. In my view, such autonomy is necessary to preserve the ability of religious groups to generate, live out and communicate their own visions for social life, including ideas that can push the norms ...


The Court's Purpose: Secular Or Anti-Strife?, Bernadette Meyler Apr 2006

The Court's Purpose: Secular Or Anti-Strife?, Bernadette Meyler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Equal Protection Of Free Exercise: Two Approaches And Their History, Bernadette Meyler Mar 2006

The Equal Protection Of Free Exercise: Two Approaches And Their History, Bernadette Meyler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Contrary to critics of the Supreme Court's current equal protection approach to religious liberty, this Article contends that, from the very first federal free exercise cases, the Equal Protection and Free Exercise Clauses have been mutually intertwined. The seeds of an equal protection analysis of free exercise were, indeed, planted even before the Fourteenth Amendment within the constitutional jurisprudence of the several states. Furthermore, this Article argues, equal protection approaches should not be uniformly disparaged. Rather, the drawbacks that commentators have observed result largely from the Supreme Court's application of an inadequate version of equal protection. By ignoring ...


Jeffersonian Walls And Madisonian Lines: The Supreme Court’S Use Of History In Religion Clause Cases, Mark Hall Jan 2006

Jeffersonian Walls And Madisonian Lines: The Supreme Court’S Use Of History In Religion Clause Cases, Mark Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

In Everson v. Board of Education (1947), Justice Wiley Rutledge observed that '[n]o provision of the Constitution is more closely tied to or given content by its generating history than the religious clause of the First Amendment. It is at once the refined product and the terse summation of that history.' Scholars and activists argue about the relevance or irrelevance of the Supreme Court’s use of history in general, and the extent to which Justices are good historians. These debates have been particularly furious with respect to the Court’s use of history in religion clause cases. Although ...


Some Thoughts On Religion, Abstinence-Only, And Sex Education In The Public Schools, Frank S. Ravitch Jan 2006

Some Thoughts On Religion, Abstinence-Only, And Sex Education In The Public Schools, Frank S. Ravitch

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2006

Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

In volume 1, James Hitchcock provides a comprehensive historical treatment of all the U.S. Supreme Court cases involving the religion clauses. Volume 2 focuses on the broader “context of the continuing dialogue about the role of religion in public life” and its relationship to the Court’s interpretation of the religion clauses.


Looking Beyond The Mercy/Justice Dichotomy: Reflections On The Complementary Roles Of Mercy And Justice In Jewish Law And Tradition, Samuel J. Levine Jan 2006

Looking Beyond The Mercy/Justice Dichotomy: Reflections On The Complementary Roles Of Mercy And Justice In Jewish Law And Tradition, Samuel J. Levine

Scholarly Works

In one of his earliest encyclicals, Dives in Misericordia, Pope John Paul II explored the concepts of mercy and kindness, with a focus on notions of divine love and compassion. Building upon these observations, and drawing extensively on the work of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik and other scholars of Jewish law and philosophy, Levine considers the complementary roles of justice and mercy in Jewish tradition. Toward that end, Levine places these concepts in a broader perspective, viewing mercy as representative of attributes such as kindness, compassion, love, and peacefulness, while understanding justice in terms of more exacting principles, such as strict ...


In Praise Of Contextuality - Justice O'Connor And The Establishment Clause, Marie Failinger Jan 2006

In Praise Of Contextuality - Justice O'Connor And The Establishment Clause, Marie Failinger

Faculty Scholarship

Among Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s lasting contributions to Supreme Court Jurisprudence has been her attempt to contextualize Religion Clause jurisprudence, to move the Court in the direction of considering the circumstances surrounding government in assessing its constitutionality. Typical of this contributor has been her two decades of work in Establishment Clause law, in particular, ended by Lynch v. Donnelly, in which she introduced the “non-endorsement” test and one of the Ten Commandment cases, McCreary County, Kentucky v. American Civil Liberties Union, in which it was most recently employed. The non-endorsement test has served as one of the two ...


Divine Justice And Human Order: An Islamic Perspective, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri Jan 2006

Divine Justice And Human Order: An Islamic Perspective, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri

Law Faculty Publications

This essay will argue that there is a unified worldview that permeates the Qur'an, and that makes it a seamless web of ideas, so that each verse cannot be properly understood without reference to others.


Ignore The Rumors—Campaigning From The Pulpit Is Okay: Thinking Past The Symbolism Of Section 501(C)(3), Michael Hatfield Jan 2006

Ignore The Rumors—Campaigning From The Pulpit Is Okay: Thinking Past The Symbolism Of Section 501(C)(3), Michael Hatfield

Articles

This Article is enough to ruin many Thanksgiving family dinners. It is about American religion, politics, and taxes. Mostly it is about taxes. As I will explain, this is what sets it apart from the contemporary legal scholarship exploring the campaign restrictions on tax exempt churches. This Introduction identifies the problem addressed in the article, then introduces the contemporary legal scholarship and the alternative approach this article takes.

Part I of this Article introduces the reader to the legal context of "the problem" of churches being unable to campaign if they choose to be Tax Exempt under Section 501 (c ...


Religion In The Classroom In Germany And The United States, Edward J. Eberle Jan 2006

Religion In The Classroom In Germany And The United States, Edward J. Eberle

Law Faculty Scholarship

In this Article, Professor Eberle evaluates the relationship of religion in the classroom in Germany and the United States, as formulated by the countries' highest courts, the German Constitutional Court and the United States Supreme Court Pursuant to the German model of church-state cooperation, public finds are channeled to religious organizations, such as, for example, using the machinery of the state to rise and disperse tax monies to religious organizations. Religious groups may then use the tax monies collected to support religious education in the public schools. However, pursuant to guidelines announced by the German Constitutional Court, teaching of religious ...


Islam, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri Jan 2006

Islam, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri

Law Faculty Publications

This chapter is to seek the lore, law, and life of marriage and family in Islam in their genesis and in their exodus, in their origins and in their diasporas.


Play In The Joints Between The Religion Clauses' And Other Supreme Court Catachreses, Carl H. Esbeck Jan 2006

Play In The Joints Between The Religion Clauses' And Other Supreme Court Catachreses, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

Consistent with its fumbling of late when dealing with cases involving religion, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken to reciting the metaphor of play in the joints between the Religion Clauses. This manner of framing the issue before the Court presumes that the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses run in opposing directions, and indeed will often conflict. It then becomes the Court's task, as it sees it, to determine if the law in question falls safely in the narrows where there is space for legislative action neither compelled by the Free Exercise Clause nor prohibited by the Establishment ...


What's Real For Law?, Jospeh Vining Jan 2006

What's Real For Law?, Jospeh Vining

Articles

Law is not academic. The univeristy if not its home. Law is in the wider world and is pervasive there, in language, thought, and action.


Law, Religion, And Medical Science: Conjunctive Or Disjunctive?, George P. Smith Ii Jan 2006

Law, Religion, And Medical Science: Conjunctive Or Disjunctive?, George P. Smith Ii

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


Faith In The Public Square: Some Reflections On Its Role And Limitations From The Perspective Of Catholic Social Thought, Lucia A. Silecchia Jan 2006

Faith In The Public Square: Some Reflections On Its Role And Limitations From The Perspective Of Catholic Social Thought, Lucia A. Silecchia

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the proper role of religion in the public square. This paper offers brief reflections on the role for religious entities to play in the process of law-making and the development of public policy. It addresses this question NOT from the perspective of the government looking at religion to see what role it should play. Rather, it examines this question from the perspective of a religious group assessing what its proper role and moral obligations might be in the public square. Much of this discussion is taken, specifically, from principles of ...


Governance And The Religion Question: Voluntaryism, Disestablishment, And America's Church-State Proposition, Carl H. Esbeck Jan 2006

Governance And The Religion Question: Voluntaryism, Disestablishment, And America's Church-State Proposition, Carl H. Esbeck

Faculty Publications

The quandary over how to structure the relationship between religion and the civil state is an ancient one. From the perspective of political philosophy this is the religion question, and events over many centuries have proven that the answer is easy to get wrong. Religion, by its very definition, is the fixed point from which all else is surveyed. It is about ultimate matters, both micro and macro. Hence, religion addresses the irreducible core of personhood and its meaning, while at the same time religion embraces a worldview that transcends and encompasses everything else. Religion generates intense emotions that when ...


Jesus And The Samaritan Woman: A Coda, Alan Watson Jan 2006

Jesus And The Samaritan Woman: A Coda, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

For the final examination in my 'Law and the Gospels' class at the University of Georgia Law School, fall semester in 2004, I set essay questions, one of which was about law in the encounter between Jesus and the Samaritan woman in John 4. Several students chose that option. I had already published on the subject, claiming that the episode involved a sexual 'come-on' by the woman. 'Bucket' was a hidden -- not too hidden -- word for 'penis', 'well' likewise for 'vagina', and 'living water' for 'semen'. In antiquity, as in the modern Western world (until recently), women were not supposed ...


A Monk's Musings: A Coda, Alan Watson Jan 2006

A Monk's Musings: A Coda, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

I have set out this coda by my close relative and colleague with some reluctance. My reluctance has nothing to do with the quality of the peace. But Sandy is insistent. He is keen on advancement within his law school. Publications are needed. But no law review would be interested in this; it is too short, and has not enough footnotes.

My reluctance to deal with Sandy's coda increased because it contains no law. Yet, it is precisely that which brings out the importance of the episode of Jesus and the Samaritan woman in the Gospel of John. For ...


A King Who Devours His People: Jiang Zemin And The Falun Gong Crackddown: A Bibliography, Michael J. Greenlee Jan 2006

A King Who Devours His People: Jiang Zemin And The Falun Gong Crackddown: A Bibliography, Michael J. Greenlee

Faculty Scholarship

In July 1999, the government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) began an official crackdown against the qigong cultivation group known as Falun Gong. Intended to quickly contain and eliminate what the PRC considers an evil or heretical cult (xiejiao), the suppression has instead created the longest sustained and, since the Tiananmen Square protests of June 1989, most widely known human rights protest conducted in the PRC. The Falun Gong has received worldwide recognition and support while the crackdown continues to provoke harsh criticism against the PRC as new allegations of human ...


Final Report Of The Maldivian Penal Law & Sentencing Codification Project: Text Of Draft Code (Volume 1) And Official Commentary (Volume 2), Paul H. Robinson, Criminal Law Research Group -- University Of Pennsylvania Jan 2006

Final Report Of The Maldivian Penal Law & Sentencing Codification Project: Text Of Draft Code (Volume 1) And Official Commentary (Volume 2), Paul H. Robinson, Criminal Law Research Group -- University Of Pennsylvania

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The United Nations Development Programme and the Government of the Maldives commissioned the drafting of a penal code based upon existing Maldivian law, which meant primarily a codification of Shari'a. This is the Final Report of that codification project. A description of the process that produced this Report and the drafting principles behind it, as well as a discussion of the special challenges of codifying Islamic criminal law, are contained in an article at http://ssrn.com/abstract=941443.


Old Ground And New Directions At Sacred Sites On The Western Landscape, Kristen A. Carpenter Jan 2006

Old Ground And New Directions At Sacred Sites On The Western Landscape, Kristen A. Carpenter

Articles

The federal public lands contain places with both religious and secular value for American people. American Indians, in particular, hold certain natural features to be sacred, and visit them for ceremonies and worship. Simultaneously, non-Indians use the same places for economic, recreation, and many other purposes - and conflicts arise between these groups. In the past twenty years, a body of constitutional jurisprudence has developed to address questions of religious freedoms and public access rights on these lands that are owned and managed by the federal government. This article outlines the relevant First Amendment framework as well as recent statutes that ...


The Interests Of "Peoples" In The Cooperative Management Of Sacred Sites, Kristen A. Carpenter Jan 2006

The Interests Of "Peoples" In The Cooperative Management Of Sacred Sites, Kristen A. Carpenter

Articles

This essay contends that there is a structural element of federal law and policy that sets up legal battles over American Indian sacred sites. The Supreme Court has held that whatever rights groups may have at sacred sites, the federal government's rights as owner and sovereign of the public lands ultimately prevails. Federal agencies can, if they choose, accommodate various interests on the public lands, but such decisions are left to fluctuating executive policy and the discretion of land managers. This approach reflects well-established doctrine in public lands law, but leaves various citizens and groups clamoring for the federal ...


Listening To All The Voices, Old And New: The Evolution Of Land Ownership In The Modern West, Charles Wilkinson Jan 2006

Listening To All The Voices, Old And New: The Evolution Of Land Ownership In The Modern West, Charles Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Book Review. The Supreme Court And Religion In American Life, Daniel O. Conkle Jan 2006

Book Review. The Supreme Court And Religion In American Life, Daniel O. Conkle

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Apparent Consistency Of Religion Clause Doctrine, The The Rehnquist Court And The First Amendment, Abner S. Greene Jan 2006

Apparent Consistency Of Religion Clause Doctrine, The The Rehnquist Court And The First Amendment, Abner S. Greene

Faculty Scholarship

A hallmark of religion clause scholarship is the complaint that the doctrine is a hopeless muddle. However, the Rehnquist Court brought a considerable amount of consistency-well, apparent consistency- to the doctrine. I say "apparent consistency" because, just as a paradox is only a seeming contradiction, so was the Rehnquist Court's religion clause jurisprudence only seemingly consistent. The doctrine focuses on whether the government singles out religion for special benefit (generally problematic under the Establishment Clause) or for special burden (generally problematic under the Free Exercise Clause). If, on the other hand, the government benefits religion as part of a ...