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Flexible Work Arrangements: The Overview Memo, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Sep 2006

Flexible Work Arrangements: The Overview Memo, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Memos and Fact Sheets

Many employees today have ongoing, predictable demands on their time outside of work. These demands may include dependent children, an ill family member, a long commute, a desire for increased education, or a commitment to community or religious activities. To meet these demands, and to get a paying job done, such individuals often need to work at a different time or in a different place than the traditional “9 am to 5 pm, five days/week, face time at the workplace” rubric.

In response to employee and employer needs and preferences, some employers provide what we call “Flexible placethat work ...


The United Kingdom Flexible Working Act, Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic Sep 2006

The United Kingdom Flexible Working Act, Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic

Memos and Fact Sheets

In 2002, the United Kingdom passed new legislation granting employees with young or disabled children the right to request flexible work arrangements from their employers. The law does not guarantee a right to flexible working but seeks to increase flexibility in UK workplaces by requiring a process for negotiation between employees and employers. Stated simply, that process places the initial responsibility on the employee to propose a new work arrangement and explain its potential impact on the employer. The employee and employer must then consider the request together, and the employer may refuse the request only for certain business reasons.


Flexible Work Arrangements: Selected Case Studies, Jean Flatley Mcguire, Phyllis Brashler Sep 2006

Flexible Work Arrangements: Selected Case Studies, Jean Flatley Mcguire, Phyllis Brashler

Memos and Fact Sheets

Employees have shown a great desire for flexible work arrangements (FWAs). National data reveals that nearly 80% of workers say they would like to have more flexible work options and would use them if there were no negative consequences at work. However, most workers do not have access to flexible work arrangements and barriers to their effective implementation persist in many organizations as the following nationally representative employer-based survey data reveals.


Short Term Time Off: The Current State Of Play, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Sep 2006

Short Term Time Off: The Current State Of Play, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Memos and Fact Sheets

Many people think of workplace flexibility as flexibility that is provided on a long term, regular basis — for example, flexibility provided through alternative work schedules, compressed workweeks, or part time positions. Under Workplace Flexibility 2010’s conceptualization, however, workplace flexibility also includes the ability to address day-to-day life needs on a short term basis.

Short term needs for flexibility are numerous: to recover from an illness; take care of a sick child; attend a school conference, funeral or medical appointment; wait for a repair person; or appear in court. Some needs may be anticipated; others will arise unexpectedly.


The Federal Employees Flexible And Compressed Work Schedules Act (Fefcwa), Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic Apr 2006

The Federal Employees Flexible And Compressed Work Schedules Act (Fefcwa), Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic

Memos and Fact Sheets

Federal law establishes scheduling requirements for government employees, generally requiring federal agencies to set regular work hours over a traditional Monday through Friday workweek. These requirements, along with provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), impede flexible work arrangements (FWAs) for federal employees.1 The Federal Employees Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules Act (“FEFCWA”) removes these legal barriers for two specific types of alternative work schedules (AWS): flexible work schedules (FWS) and compressed work schedules (CWS). Under an FWS, an agency establishes core hours when all employees must be at work and allows employees to choose arrival and departure ...


Comparative Chart Of “Right-To-Ask” Laws In The U.S. And Abroad, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Apr 2006

Comparative Chart Of “Right-To-Ask” Laws In The U.S. And Abroad, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

No abstract provided.


The New South Wales Carers’ Responsibilities Act, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center, Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic Apr 2006

The New South Wales Carers’ Responsibilities Act, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center, Georgetown Federal Legislation Clinic

Memos and Fact Sheets

Enacted in 2001, the New South Wales Carers’ Responsibilities Act (“CRA”) prohibits discrimination against employees with caregiver responsibilities and provides access to reasonable flexible work arrangements. Under this law, employees have the right to request accommodations for their carer responsibilities, and employers have an affirmative obligation to consider and grant reasonable accommodations that do not impose an unjustifiable hardship. The affirmative accommodation requirement extends to requests for flexible working hours, working from home (telecommuting), part-time work, and job-share arrangements.


Examples Of State Flexible Work Arrangement (Fwa) Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Apr 2006

Examples Of State Flexible Work Arrangement (Fwa) Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

Flexible Work Arrangements (FWAs) alter the time and/or place that work is conducted on a regular basis -- in a manner that is as manageable and predictable as possible for both employees and employers. This document charts examples of state FWA laws.


Flexible Work Arrangements: A Definition And Examples, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Mar 2006

Flexible Work Arrangements: A Definition And Examples, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Memos and Fact Sheets

Workplace Flexibility 2010 defines a “flexible work arrangement” (FWA) as any one of a spectrum of work structures that alters the time and/or place that work gets done on a regular basis. A flexible work arrangement includes:

1. flexibility in the scheduling of hours worked, such as alternative work schedules (e.g., flex time and compressed workweeks), and arrangements regarding shift and break schedules;

2. flexibility in the amount of hours worked, such as part time work and job shares; and

3. flexibility in the place of work, such as working at home or at a satellite location.

Our ...


Select Foreign Exto Laws: By Country, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Jan 2006

Select Foreign Exto Laws: By Country, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

No abstract provided.


Select Foreign Exto Laws: By Topic, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Jan 2006

Select Foreign Exto Laws: By Topic, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

No abstract provided.


Summary Comparison Of Select Foreign Exto Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Jan 2006

Summary Comparison Of Select Foreign Exto Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

No abstract provided.


State-By-State Guide To Unpaid, Job-Protected Extended Time Off Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center Jan 2006

State-By-State Guide To Unpaid, Job-Protected Extended Time Off Laws, Workplace Flexibility 2010, Georgetown University Law Center

Charts and Summaries of State, U.S., and Foreign Laws and Regulations

No abstract provided.


Block Grants, Early Childhood Education, And The Reauthorization Of Head Start: From Positional Conflict To Interest-Based Agreement, Eloise Pasachoff Jan 2006

Block Grants, Early Childhood Education, And The Reauthorization Of Head Start: From Positional Conflict To Interest-Based Agreement, Eloise Pasachoff

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In early 2003, the Bush administration proposed and Congress considered two types of highly controversial structural reform to Head Start, the federal program that since 1965 has provided early education and comprehensive health and social services to low-income preschoolers and their families. First, the proposal would begin funding Head Start through federal block grants to the states rather than through direct federal grants to local agencies. Second, the proposal would shift oversight of Head Start at the federal level from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Department of Education (ED). Variations on these two proposals have ...


Public Legal Reason, Lawrence B. Solum Jan 2006

Public Legal Reason, Lawrence B. Solum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay develops an ideal of public legal reason--a normative theory of legal reasons that is appropriate for a society characterized by religious and moral pluralism. One of the implications of this theory is that normative theorizing about public and private law should eschew reliance on the deep premises of deontology or consequentialism and should instead rely on what the author calls public values--values that can be affirmed without relying on the deep and controversial premises of particular comprehensive moral doctrines.

The ideal of public legal reason is then applied to a particular question--whether welfarism (a particular form of normative ...