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2006

Jurisprudence

Institution
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Articles 31 - 60 of 111

Full-Text Articles in Law

Concurring In Part & Concurring In The Confusion, Sonja R. West Aug 2006

Concurring In Part & Concurring In The Confusion, Sonja R. West

Scholarly Works

When a federal appellate court decided last year that two reporters must either reveal their confidential sources to a grand jury or face jail time, the court did not hesitate in relying on the majority opinion in the Supreme Court's sole comment on the reporter's privilege--Branzburg v. Hayes. "The Highest Court has spoken and never revisited the question. Without doubt, that is the end of the matter," Judge Sentelle wrote for the three-judge panel on the Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. By this declaration, the court dismissed with a wave of its judicial hand ...


Christianity And The (Modest) Rule Of Law, David A. Skeel Jr., William J. Stuntz Aug 2006

Christianity And The (Modest) Rule Of Law, David A. Skeel Jr., William J. Stuntz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Conservative Christians are often accused, justifiably, of trying to impose their moral views on the rest of the population: of trying to equate God's law with man's law. In this essay, we try to answer the question whether that equation is consistent with Christianity. It isn't. Christian doctrines of creation and the fall imply the basic protections associated with the rule of law. But the moral law as defined in the Sermon on the Mount is flatly inconsistent with those protections. The most plausible inference to draw from those two conclusions is that the moral law - God ...


Due Process And Punitive Damages: The Error Of Federal Excessiveness Jurisprudence, A. Benjamin Spencer Jul 2006

Due Process And Punitive Damages: The Error Of Federal Excessiveness Jurisprudence, A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

The Supreme Court, in a line of several cases over the past decade, has established a rigorous federal constitutional excessiveness review for punitive damages awards based on the Due Process Clause. As a matter of substantive due process, says the Court, punitive awards must be evaluated by three "guideposts" set forth in BMW of North America v. Gore: the degree of reprehensibility of the defendant's conduct, the ratio between punitive and compensatory damages, and a comparison of the amount of punitive damages to any "civil or criminal penalties that could be imposed for comparable misconduct." Following up on this ...


The Future Of International Law Is Domestic (Or, The European Way Of Law), William W. Burke-White, Anne-Marie Slaughter Jul 2006

The Future Of International Law Is Domestic (Or, The European Way Of Law), William W. Burke-White, Anne-Marie Slaughter

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Common Law As An Iterative Process: A Preliminary Inquiry, Lawrence A. Cunningham Jun 2006

The Common Law As An Iterative Process: A Preliminary Inquiry, Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The common law often is casually referred to as an iterative process without much attention given to the detailed attributes such processes exhibit. This Article explores this characterization, uncovering how common law as an iterative process is one of endless repetition that is simultaneously stable and dynamic, self-similar but evolving, complex yet simple. These attributes constrain the systemic significance of judicial discretion and also confirm the wisdom of traditional approaches to studying and learning law. As an iterative system, common law exhibits what physicists call sensitive dependence on initial conditions. This generates a path dependency from which it may be ...


“For The Murder Of His Own Female Slave, A Woman Named Mira...” : Law, Slavery And Incoherence In Antebellum North Carolina, Anthony V. Baker Mar 2006

“For The Murder Of His Own Female Slave, A Woman Named Mira...” : Law, Slavery And Incoherence In Antebellum North Carolina, Anthony V. Baker

Student Scholarship Papers

“for the murder of his own female slave, a woman named Mira...” : Law, Slavery and Incoherence in Antebellum North Carolina

__________________________________________________________

“The death of culture begins when its normative institutions fail to communicate ideals in ways that remain inwardly compelling...”

Phillip Rieff

In the spring of 1839 a ‘slave owner,’ ­ Mr. John Hoover ­ was arrested for the brutal murder of his own ‘property,’ a young woman named Mira. Convicted of the capital charge by a jury of his peers ­ 12 fellow ‘slave owners,’ as the relevant law then required ­ his appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court was rejected in ...


Treating Religion As Speech: Justice Stevens's Religion Clause Jurisprudence, Eduardo M. Peñalver Mar 2006

Treating Religion As Speech: Justice Stevens's Religion Clause Jurisprudence, Eduardo M. Peñalver

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Justice Stevens has sometimes been caricatured as the U.S. Supreme Court Justice who hates religion. Whether considering questions under the Establishment Clause or the Free Exercise Clause, questions about the funding or regulation of religious groups, or the permissibility of religious speech in public places, in case after case he has voted against religion. Like most caricatures, this view of Justice Stevens is based on a kernel of truth. He does appear to be more likely to vote against religious groups than any other Justice. But an exploration of the cases in which Justice Stevens has voted in favor ...


Barriers In The Land Of The Free, Gary L. Mcdowell Feb 2006

Barriers In The Land Of The Free, Gary L. Mcdowell

Jepson School of Leadership Studies articles, book chapters and other publications

The best way to get judges to write books is apparently to lure them to the lecterns of prominent lecture series, then turn their remarks into something more permanent. Perhaps the most successful of these schemes was Judge Benjamin Cardozo's 1921 Storrs lectures at the Yale Law School that appeared in the same year as The Nature of the Judicial Process . While a judge on the New York Court of Appeals, before he was elevated to the US Supreme Court in 1932, Cardozo saw two further series of lectures appear in print as The Growth of the Law (1924 ...


Demystifying Legal Reasoning: Part Ii, Larry Alexander, Emily Sherwin Jan 2006

Demystifying Legal Reasoning: Part Ii, Larry Alexander, Emily Sherwin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

"Demystifying Legal Reasoning" defends the proposition that there are no special forms of reasoning peculiar to law. Legal decisionmakers engage in the same modes of reasoning that all actors use in deciding what to do: open-ended moral reasoning, empirical reasoning, and deduction from authoritative rules. Part II (abstracted here) addresses common law reasoning, when prior judicial decisions determine the law. Part III addresses interpretation of texts. We conclude that, in both areas, the popular view that legal decisionmakers practice special forms of reasoning are false.

In Chapter 2, we propose that there are two plausible models of common law reasoning ...


Brief Of Law Professors David D. Cole Et Al. As Amici Curiae Supporting Petitioner (Geneva-Enforceability), Hamdan V. Rumsfield, No. 05-184 (U.S. Jan. 6, 2006), David Cole, Julie R. O'Sullivan, Carlos Manuel Vázquez Jan 2006

Brief Of Law Professors David D. Cole Et Al. As Amici Curiae Supporting Petitioner (Geneva-Enforceability), Hamdan V. Rumsfield, No. 05-184 (U.S. Jan. 6, 2006), David Cole, Julie R. O'Sullivan, Carlos Manuel Vázquez

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Cover Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Cover

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

No abstract provided.


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Table Of Contents Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Table Of Contents

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

Judges vs. Juries by Brian H. Bornstein
Thoughts About Enriching Judicial Independence by Improving the Retention Vote Phase of Appointive Selection Systems by Hon. John F. Irwin and Daniel L. Real
Judicial Reform in Texas: A Look Back After Two Decades by Anthony Champagne
Appointive Selection of Judges, Limited-Jurisdiction Courts with Non-Lawyer Judiciaries, and Judicial Independence by Norman L. Greene
The Legislatures, the Ballot Boxes, and the Courts by William E. Raftery
Editor’s Note
President’s Column
The Resource Page


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – President’S Column, Steve Leben Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – President’S Column, Steve Leben

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

By the time you read this, Eileen Olds will have been busy working as the American Judges Association's president for some time. That means two things for me. First, I’ll no longer be on the treadmill-like travel schedule that accompanies that office. Second, I’ll be back at work as the editor of Court Review, getting its publication schedule back on track.

But before relinquishing this space, allow me a few moments to talk about the AJA and its work over the past year.

Like most professional associations, our potential is hindered a bit by the one-year term ...


Thoughts About Enriching Judicial Independence By Improving The Retention Vote Phase Of Appointive Selection Systems, Jon F. Irwin, Daniel Real Jan 2006

Thoughts About Enriching Judicial Independence By Improving The Retention Vote Phase Of Appointive Selection Systems, Jon F. Irwin, Daniel Real

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

In August 1979, Time magazine featured an article titled, “Judging the Judges.” In that article, nearly 30 years ago, was a discussion about a number of problems facing the judiciary as well as a discussion about potential reforms to address the problems. One of the problems discussed at some length was public perception that the judiciary lacked sufficient impartiality. While recognizing the emergence of judicial discipline systems to address partiality problems of sitting judges, the article also noted “a convincing argument for getting better judges to begin with.” The article also recognized that, at that time, “half the states [had ...


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Editor’S Note, Alan J. Tomkins Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Editor’S Note, Alan J. Tomkins

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

My inaugural issue of Court Review contains articles examining judicial selection, retention, and independence. Public scrutiny of the courts is especially complicated. On the one hand, democratic theory supports a role for the citizenry in judging judges: Governmental transparency, accountability, and public input into governmental policy-making are important principles for strong, democratic public institutions. On the other hand, it seems counterproductive to have the third branch undergo the same kinds of inspections that officials elected to the executive and legislative branches of government undergo. Judges are supposed to operate independently and impartially, not looking over their shoulder when they rule ...


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Judges Vs. Juries, Brian H. Bornstein Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Judges Vs. Juries, Brian H. Bornstein

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

This article introduces a new feature for Court Review, “Social Science Research for (and in) the Courts,” the purpose of which is to summarize recent research on social science topics that judges might encounter. Social science research has a long-standing, and sometimes tense, relationship with the law. Nonetheless, there are signs that the courts’ receptivity to social science research is growing. The fields of psychology and the law and economics and the law have expanded considerably in the last 20 or so years. Because judges are increasingly likely to encounter social science issues, the goal of these columns is to ...


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

Judges vs. Juries by Brian H. Bornstein
Thoughts About Enriching Judicial Independence by Improving the Retention Vote Phase of Appointive Selection Systems by Hon. John F. Irwin and Daniel L. Real
Judicial Reform in Texas: A Look Back After Two Decades by Anthony Champagne
Appointive Selection of Judges, Limited-Jurisdiction Courts with Non-Lawyer Judiciaries, and Judicial Independence by Norman L. Greene
The Legislatures, the Ballot Boxes, and the Courts by William E. Raftery
Editor’s Note
President’s Column
The Resource Page


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – The Resource Page Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – The Resource Page

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

Websites
Publications


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – The Legislatures, The Ballot Boxes, And The Courts, William Raftery Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – The Legislatures, The Ballot Boxes, And The Courts, William Raftery

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

As a separation-of-powers matter, the nation’s framers and their state counterparts placed some distance between the legislative and judiciary branches so that each might better serve the people. Of course, the separation between the two branches has not prevented legislation impacting the courts year in and year out, much of which could reasonably be described as changes that potentially infringe on the independence, fairness, and impartiality of the courts. (I term these “attacks on the courts.”) Moreover, the issue has been compounded lately by a series of efforts in initiative and referendum states to achieve by the ballot box ...


Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Judicial Reform In Texas: A Look Back After Two Decades, Anthony Champagne Jan 2006

Court Review: Volume 43, Issue 2 – Judicial Reform In Texas: A Look Back After Two Decades, Anthony Champagne

Court Review: The Journal of the American Judges Association

One of the most frequently quoted comments on judicial reform is the late New Jersey Chief Justice Arthur T. Vanderbilt’s remark, “Judicial reform is not for the short-winded.” Vanderbilt’s remark illustrates a key point about judicial selection reform. Reforms do not occur simply because someone or some group in a state decides that change in the system of selection is desirable; rather, it is necessary for key interest groups in the judicial politics of a state to reach a sufficient political consensus that change can occur. A variety of factors may lead to such a consensus on the ...


An Excuse-Centered Approach To Transitional Justice, David C. Gray Jan 2006

An Excuse-Centered Approach To Transitional Justice, David C. Gray

Faculty Scholarship

Transitional justice asks what successor regimes, committed to human rights and the rule of law, can and should do to seek justice for atrocities perpetrated by and under their predecessors. The normal instinct is to prosecute criminally everyone implicated in past wrongs; but practical conditions in transitions make this impossible. As a result, most transitions pursue hybrid approaches, featuring prosecutions of those most responsible, amnesties, truth commissions, and reparations. This approach is often condemned as a compromise against justice. This article advances a transitional jurisprudence that justifies the hybrid approach by taking normative account of the unique conditions that define ...


Argument, Political Friendship And Rhetorical Knowledge: A Review Of Garver's For The Sake Of Argument, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2006

Argument, Political Friendship And Rhetorical Knowledge: A Review Of Garver's For The Sake Of Argument, Francis J. Mootz Iii

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


The Framers' Idea Of Marriage And Family, David F. Forte Jan 2006

The Framers' Idea Of Marriage And Family, David F. Forte

Law Faculty Contributions to Books

The founders understood the symbiotic connection between family virtues and civic virtues. They knew it through their study of the classics, through their imbibing of the Scottish enlightenment, through their understanding of the providential nature of the Judeo-Christian God, through their familiarity with self-governing liberty, and through their utter respect of their own human experience of living. They looked upon the family as a model in which man’s selfish impulses would be contained, where the coordination of practical tasks could be effectuated, and where sentiments of affection and mutual respect could bind a people into a nation. It was ...


Fair Use And The Fairer Sex: Gender, Feminism, And Copyright Law, Ann Bartow Jan 2006

Fair Use And The Fairer Sex: Gender, Feminism, And Copyright Law, Ann Bartow

Law Faculty Scholarship

Copyright laws are written and enforced to help certain groups of people assert and retain control over the resources generated by creative productivity. Because those people are predominantly male, the copyright infrastructure plays a role, largely unexamined by legal scholars, in helping to sustain the material and economic inequality between women and men. This essay considers some of the ways in which gender issues and copyright laws intersect, proposes a feminist critique of the copyright legal regime which advocates low levels of copyright protections, and asserts the importance of considering the social and economic disparities between women and men when ...


Rules, Standards, And The Internal Point Of View, Dale A. Nance Jan 2006

Rules, Standards, And The Internal Point Of View, Dale A. Nance

Faculty Publications

The general thrust of the present discussion is that, in addition to its contribution to economizing on enforcement costs, there is a connection between the internal point of view and the aspiration to republican self-government: the greater the incidence of the former, the greater the achievement of the latter, ceteris paribus. This fact imbues the notion of a healthy legal system with a crucially normative component that goes beyond, and need not be inconsistent with, efficient social organization.


Aspiration And Underenforcement, Kermit Roosevelt Iii Jan 2006

Aspiration And Underenforcement, Kermit Roosevelt Iii

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Law’S Quandary: An Echo Of The Infinite, A Glimpse Of The Unfathomable, William J. Wagner Jan 2006

Law’S Quandary: An Echo Of The Infinite, A Glimpse Of The Unfathomable, William J. Wagner

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2006

Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

The worst problems with the fetal homicide laws that have proliferated around the nation are quite different than the existing scholarship suggests. Critics often argue that the statutes, which criminalize the killing of a fetus by a third party other than an abortion provider, undermine a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy. This concern is overstated. Although supported by anti-abortionists, many of the fetal homicide laws embody the perspective of the so-called "abortion grays," who eschew the absolutism of the doctrinaire pro-choice and anti-abortion camps. This Article explores how a contextual view of life-taking allows us to reconcile legal ...


Repraesentatio In Classical Latin, Alan Watson Jan 2006

Repraesentatio In Classical Latin, Alan Watson

Scholarly Works

The Romans knew well the twin concepts of representation and representatives in law suits and in the relationships between father and son, and owner and slave. But for these concepts they did not use the terms repraesentare or any cognate.

To Tertullian, it seems, goes the credit of first using repraesentare and repraesentator in their modern senses of <> and <>. That his context is theological probably should not surprise since he is, above all, a theologian.

Thus he uses repraesentare to mean that the one larger and more important may represent the many and less important. This usage had a long ...


Preemption In The Rehnquist Court: A Preliminary Empirical Assessment, Michael S. Greve, Jonathan Klick Jan 2006

Preemption In The Rehnquist Court: A Preliminary Empirical Assessment, Michael S. Greve, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The federal preemption of state law has emerged as a prominent field of study for legal scholars and political scientists. This rise to prominence of a technical and often dull field of jurisprudence is due to a number of developments-increasingly frequent federal statutory preemptions; the states' unprecedented aggressiveness in regulating business transactions, the expansion of corporate liability under state common law and the increased resort of corporate defendants to federal preemption defenses; and, not least, the Rehnquist Court's discovery of federalism and states' rights.

Unfortunately, the preemption debate has been marred by misperceptions and a lack of reliable data ...