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Book Review | Dan Sarooshi, International Organizations And Their Exercise Of Sovereign Powers (2005) & Margaret P. Karns & Karen A. Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics And Processes Of Global Governance (2004), Christopher G. Bradley Oct 2006

Book Review | Dan Sarooshi, International Organizations And Their Exercise Of Sovereign Powers (2005) & Margaret P. Karns & Karen A. Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics And Processes Of Global Governance (2004), Christopher G. Bradley

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This book review considers two books on international organizations: (1) Margaret P. Karns & Karen A. Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics and Processes of Global Governance, and (2) Dan Sarooshi, International Organizations and Their Exercise of Sovereign Powers.

The review notes several features that set the Karns & Mingst book apart from other treatments of international organizations. First is a thoroughgoing commitment to an integrated view of international organizations. The book insists (and demonstrates) that knowledge of politics, theory, and history are all indispensable to a rich understanding of the problems and processes of global governance. Second, Karns and Mingst refuse to ...


South Korea's National Security Law: A Tool Of Oppression In An Insecure World, Diane B. Kraft Jan 2006

South Korea's National Security Law: A Tool Of Oppression In An Insecure World, Diane B. Kraft

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In September 2004, the ruling party in South Korea, along with two opposition parties, called for the abolishment of the 1948 anti-communist National Security Law. The following month, Amnesty International, a long-time critic of the law, officially called for the law's repeal. The law had been enacted in 1948 in response to threats from communist North Korea, but has long been used by the government to silence legitimate opposition in South Korea. This Comment will examine South Korea's National Security Law as viewed by its domestic supporters and critics, as well as by the international community. Part I ...