Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Sentencing For The 'Crime Of Crimes': The Evolving 'Common Law' Of Sentencing Of The International Criminal Tribunal For Rwanda, Robert Sloane Dec 2006

Sentencing For The 'Crime Of Crimes': The Evolving 'Common Law' Of Sentencing Of The International Criminal Tribunal For Rwanda, Robert Sloane

Faculty Scholarship

Absent much prescriptive guidance in its Statute or other positive law, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has been developing, in effect, a 'common law' of sentencing for the most serious international crimes: genocide and crimes against humanity. While it remains, as the Appeals Chamber has said, premature to speak of an emerging 'penal regime', and the coherence in sentencing practice that this denotes, this comment offers some preliminary reflections on the substantive law and process of sentencing as it has evolved through ICTR practice. Above all, I argue, sentencing must, but has not yet, become an integral part ...


The Wall And The Law: A Tale Of Two Judgements, Susan Akram Jan 2006

The Wall And The Law: A Tale Of Two Judgements, Susan Akram

Faculty Scholarship

The seminal rulings in 2004 by the International Court of Justice and the Israeli High Court on the legality of the wall/barrier that Israel is building through the occupied West Bank and East Jerusalem provide a study in contrast. While both judgements were critical of the wall/barrier, their judicial approaches and legal conclusions were strikingly divergent, particularly given that the two courts were purporting to rely upon the same principles of international law. The judgements also elicited quite different political and diplomatic reactions, especially among the parties most involved in the Israel/Palestine conflict. This article explores the ...