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Full-Text Articles in Law

Protecting Your Personal Privacy: A Self-Help Guide For Judges And Their Families (2006), Chicago Bar Association’S Privacy Task Force, John Marshall Law School Center For Information Technology & Privacy Law, Leslie Ann Reis Oct 2006

Protecting Your Personal Privacy: A Self-Help Guide For Judges And Their Families (2006), Chicago Bar Association’S Privacy Task Force, John Marshall Law School Center For Information Technology & Privacy Law, Leslie Ann Reis

Center and Clinic White Papers

“I believe that the Internet is a brave new world in the matter of judicial security.” – Testimony of Joan H. Lefkow, United States District Judge, before the Judiciary Committee of the United States Senate (May 18, 2005).

Your personal information may be no farther away than a mouse-click... Your name, locations of your home and workplace, your phone number and email address, details of your family members, your political leanings and many more pieces of information are available through a wide array of public and private sources. But, this is nothing new. Some personal information about you has always been ...


The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, 65 Md. L. Rev. 841 (2006), Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford Jan 2006

The Phantom Philosophy? An Empirical Investigation Of Legal Interpretation, 65 Md. L. Rev. 841 (2006), Jason J. Czarnezki, William K. Ford

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

This Article tests a model of judicial decision making that incorporates elements of both the attitudinal model and the legal model, along with measures of institutional and judicial background characteristics such as collegiality and trial court experience. We develop a measure of interpretive philosophy relying primarily on judicial opinions, which we code for certain indicators of traditional interpretive approaches (i.e., the use of interpretive tools). The critical question is whether judges with similar interpretive philosophies are more likely to agree with one another when deciding cases. Our general finding is that ideology and interpretive philosophy are not significant predictors ...


Judging Expertise In Copyright Law, 14 J. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2006), William K. Ford Jan 2006

Judging Expertise In Copyright Law, 14 J. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2006), William K. Ford

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.