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Some Reflections On The Symposium: Judging, The Classical Legal Paradigm And The Possible Contributions Of Science, Christina E. Wells Oct 2005

Some Reflections On The Symposium: Judging, The Classical Legal Paradigm And The Possible Contributions Of Science, Christina E. Wells

Faculty Publications

One theme running through the many excellent contributions to this symposium involves the myriad influences on judicial decision-making. As Professor Wrightsman notes, Supreme Court Justices' personal characteristics may affect their ability to influence colleagues and, consequently, the outcome of Supreme Court decisions. Professor Ruger observes that judges have both attitudinal and jurisprudential preferences that may change over time, affecting legal outcomes differently as time passes. Professor Sisk similarly notes that judges' personal values and experiences influence their decision-making. These observations are consistent with those of numerous other scholars, who find wide-ranging and diverse influences on the judicial resolution of legal ...


Judicial Selection By The Numbers, Michael J. Gerhardt Jul 2005

Judicial Selection By The Numbers, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Fourth Amendment Federalism? The Court's Vacillating Mistrust And Trust Of State Search And Seizure Laws, Kathryn R. Urbonya Jul 2005

Fourth Amendment Federalism? The Court's Vacillating Mistrust And Trust Of State Search And Seizure Laws, Kathryn R. Urbonya

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Constitutional Limits To Court-Stripping, Michael J. Gerhardt Jul 2005

The Constitutional Limits To Court-Stripping, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

This Article is part of a colloquy between Professor Michael J. Gerhardt and Professor Martin Redish about the constitutionality of court-stripping measures. Court-stripping measures are laws restricting federal court jurisdiction over particular subject matters. In particular, the authors discuss the constitutionality of the Marriage Protection Act of 2004. Professor Gerhardt argues that the Act is unconstitutional and threatens to destroy the principles of separation of powers, federalism and due process. It prevents Supreme Court review of Congressional action and hinders the uniformity and finality of constitutional law. Furthermore, the Act violates the equal protection component of the Fifth Amendment Due ...


Democracy And Dispute Resolution: The Problem Of Arbitration, Richard C. Reuben Apr 2005

Democracy And Dispute Resolution: The Problem Of Arbitration, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

Scholars have approached arbitration, especially under the Federal Arbitration Act, from a variety of perspectives, including doctrinal, historical, empirical, and practical. One aspect that has not yet been fully considered, however, is the relationship between arbitration and constitutional democracy. Yet, as a dispute-resolution process that is often sanctioned by the government, that sometimes inextricably intertwines governmental and private conduct, and that derives its legitimacy from the government, it is appropriate--indeed, our responsibility--to ask whether arbitration furthers the goals of democratic governance. It is only sensible that state-supported dispute resolution in a democracy should strengthen, rather than diminish, democratic governance and ...


Reflections On The Teaching Of Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne Apr 2005

Reflections On The Teaching Of Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Limited Path Dependency Of Precedent, Michael J. Gerhardt Apr 2005

The Limited Path Dependency Of Precedent, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Perfect Crime, Brian C. Kalt Jan 2005

The Perfect Crime, Brian C. Kalt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Constitutionality Of School Corporal Punishment Of Children As A Betrayal Of Brown V. Board Of Education, Susan H. Bitensky Jan 2005

The Constitutionality Of School Corporal Punishment Of Children As A Betrayal Of Brown V. Board Of Education, Susan H. Bitensky

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Locke V. Davey And The Lose-Lose Scenario: What Davey Could Have Said, But Didn't, Frank S. Ravitch Jan 2005

Locke V. Davey And The Lose-Lose Scenario: What Davey Could Have Said, But Didn't, Frank S. Ravitch

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Crossing Eight Mile: Juries Of The Vicinage And County-Line Criminal Buffer Statutes, Brian C. Kalt Jan 2005

Crossing Eight Mile: Juries Of The Vicinage And County-Line Criminal Buffer Statutes, Brian C. Kalt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Judicial Selection As...Talk Radio, Michael J. Gerhardt Jan 2005

Judicial Selection As...Talk Radio, Michael J. Gerhardt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins Jan 2005

The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Judicial Review And Nongeneralizable Cases, Neal Devins, Alan J. Meese Jan 2005

Judicial Review And Nongeneralizable Cases, Neal Devins, Alan J. Meese

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Speech Showdowns At The Virtual Corral, Eric Goldman Jan 2005

Speech Showdowns At The Virtual Corral, Eric Goldman

Faculty Publications

INTRODUCTION

This article considers the tension between free speech rights and private property/contract rights. Neither free speech rights nor private property and contract rights are absolute. Where they intersect in the physical world, confusing legal doctrines usually emerge, such as the U.S. Supreme Court cases addressing private speech at privately owned company towns and shopping centers. Though a bright-line rule has emerged-the First Amendment pertains only to stateactors-the rule provides little prospective guidance because private actors can be characterized as state actors in some circumstances.

In the online world, the speech/rights dichotomy also raises complex issues. Online ...


A Commander's Power, A Civilian's Reason: Justice Jackson's Korematsu Dissent, John Q. Barrett Jan 2005

A Commander's Power, A Civilian's Reason: Justice Jackson's Korematsu Dissent, John Q. Barrett

Faculty Publications

Robert Houghwout Jackson was a justice of the United States Supreme Court during the years of World War II. This article considers his great but potentially perplexing December 1944 dissent in Korematsu v. United States, in which he refused to join the Court majority that proclaimed the constitutionality of military orders excluding Japanese Americans from the West Coast of the United States during the War years. This article considers Justice Jackson's Korematsu dissent in full. It was and is, contrary to some of the criticisms it has received over the past 60 years, a coherent position. Jackson's dissent ...


Congressional Threats Of Removal Against Federal Judges, Marc O. Degirolami Jan 2005

Congressional Threats Of Removal Against Federal Judges, Marc O. Degirolami

Faculty Publications

The federal judicial branch has lately become the object of increasing scrutiny and distrust by its legislative counterpart. Congressional suspicion is often directed toward judicial discretion in criminal sentencing and, more generally, the degree to which judges are perceived to be beholden to a particular ideological point of view or personal bias. This distrust has bred a potent strain of political opportunism that Congress has manifested in several recent bills. One of these, the Feeney Amendment to the PROTECT Act, all but eliminated judicial discretion in sentencing and tacitly threatens judges' continued employment. Though the Supreme Court's recent decision ...


Is It Too Late For Title Vi Enforcement?: Seeking Redemption Of The Unequal United States‟ Long Term Care System Through International Means, Ruqaiijah Yearby Jan 2005

Is It Too Late For Title Vi Enforcement?: Seeking Redemption Of The Unequal United States‟ Long Term Care System Through International Means, Ruqaiijah Yearby

Faculty Publications

Legal and medical experts have noted continued racism in the health care system that prevents the equal distribution of quality care. Initially most racism was intentional and expressed through de jure segregation, as evidenced by federal funding of the construction of racial segregated health care facilities. Now most racism, expressed through de facto segregation, is subtly incorporated into the daily practices of institutions causing an adverse disparate impact on African-Americans. This institutional racism establishes separate and independent barriers through the neutral denial of opportunities and equal rights to individuals and groups that results from the normal operations of the institutions ...


Putting Religious Symbolism In Context: A Linguistic Critique Of The Endorsement Test, B. Jessie Hill Jan 2005

Putting Religious Symbolism In Context: A Linguistic Critique Of The Endorsement Test, B. Jessie Hill

Faculty Publications

The Supreme Court's jurisprudence concerning public displays of religious symbols is notoriously unpredictable. In this Article, Professor Hill argues that the instability and apparent incoherence of the Supreme Court's religious symbolism jurisprudence is due to certain difficulties inherent in discerning the "meaning" or "message" of a religious display. In particular, she attributes the unpredictability of the jurisprudence to the fact that the meaning of the display is dependent on the "context," which is itself an unmanageable and unformalizable concept. This Article, which draws on insights from literary and linguistic theory, breaks with previous commentators' claims that the difficulties ...


Jurisdictional Mismatch In Environmental Federalism, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2005

Jurisdictional Mismatch In Environmental Federalism, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

Jurisdictional mismatch plagues contemporary environmental law and policy. The division of authority and responsibility for environmental protection between the federal and state governments lacks any cohesive rationale or justification. The federal government regulates in many areas where there is no clear analytical basis for federal involvement. At the same time, the federal government is relatively absent where a stronger federal presence could be justified. Conversely, states are precluded, discouraged or otherwise inhibited from adopting environmental protections where state efforts would be worthwhile. At the same time, state intervention seeps into areas where a dominant federal role would be more defensible ...


Looking Ahead To The 2005-06 Term (2005), Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2005

Looking Ahead To The 2005-06 Term (2005), Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

This essay surveys the upcoming 2005-06 term of the Supreme Court, a term that may be as notable for what it says about the future direction of the Supreme Court as it is for specific decisions in any particular cases. This does not mean the term lacks important cases. To the contrary, this coming year the Court will consider the constitutionality of the Solomon Amendment, address the application of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to religious use of drugs, and determine whether the federal government can effectively preempt Oregon's decision to legalize doctor-assisted suicide. It will revisit contemporary federalism ...


Is Morrison Dead? Assessing A Supreme Drug (Law) Overdose, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2005

Is Morrison Dead? Assessing A Supreme Drug (Law) Overdose, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

There was little doubt that the federal government would prevail in Gonzales v. Raich. What was, perhaps, unexpected was so expansive a repudiation of enforceable judicial limitations on federal power. In upholding the constitutionality of the Controlled Substances Act as applied to the non-commercial intrastate possession and consumption of marijuana for medical purposes as authorized under California law, the Supreme Court hollowed out the core of contemporary commerce clause jurisprudence. Insofar as United States v. Morrison had stood for the propositions that only intrastate economic activities could be aggregated for purposes of the "substantial effects" test, that attenuated connections between ...


Judicial Federalism And The Future Of Federal Environmental Regulation, Jonathan H. Adler Jan 2005

Judicial Federalism And The Future Of Federal Environmental Regulation, Jonathan H. Adler

Faculty Publications

This article assesses the current and likely impact of the Supreme Court's federalism cases on federal environmental regulation. As a result of this assessment, the article seeks to make four points: (1) Thus far, the Supreme Court's federalism cases have had a limited impact on federal regulation, as federal courts have not used these cases as a basis for limiting the reach of federal regulatory authority. (2) Notwithstanding this limited impact, the underlying logic of the Supreme Court's cases does pose a challenge for federal regulation, particularly in the Commerce Clause context. (3) The thrust of the ...


Cheers, Profanity, And Free Speech, Howard M. Wasserman Jan 2005

Cheers, Profanity, And Free Speech, Howard M. Wasserman

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


In Defense Of The Debt Limit Statute, Anita S. Krishnakumar Jan 2005

In Defense Of The Debt Limit Statute, Anita S. Krishnakumar

Faculty Publications

The debt limit statute is a critical feature of the federal budget process and prompts frequent legislation to increase the government's borrowing authority. In this Article, Professor Anita S. Krishnakumar examines the history of the debt limit statute as well as its function in the fiscal constitution. The Article deconstructs several popular criticisms of the debt limit statute, arguing that the criticisms exaggerate and that the statute in fact serves two important roles: first, the statute is the last remnant of congressional control and accountability over the national debt; second, it acts as an important institutional check on party ...


The Chimera Of The Real And Substantial Connection Test, Blom Joost, Elizabeth Edinger Jan 2005

The Chimera Of The Real And Substantial Connection Test, Blom Joost, Elizabeth Edinger

Faculty Publications

This paper was first presented at a symposium held at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law on November 5 and 6, 2004 to honour the late Mr. Justice Kenneth Lysyk, a former faculty member and Dean of Law at U.B.C. For this paper we chose a topic that combines both of Ken Lysyk's favourite subjects. We set out to examine how the Supreme Court of Canada has used the "real and substantial connection" test in the conflict of laws and in related areas of constitutional law. This test has been adopted for a variety of ...


Prisoner Voting Rights In Canada: Rejecting The Notion Of Temporary Outcasts, Debra Parkes Jan 2005

Prisoner Voting Rights In Canada: Rejecting The Notion Of Temporary Outcasts, Debra Parkes

Faculty Publications

This book chapter examines a successful prisoner voting rights case in Canada and suggests that the opposition in the U.S. to postincarceration legal, social, and economic consequences of criminal conviction would benefit from attention to the way the continued construction of prisoners as temporary outcasts resonates positively in society, assisting to legitimate the myriad penalties and consequences imposed on prisoners' release.


Section 7 And The Politics Of Social Justice, Margot Young Jan 2005

Section 7 And The Politics Of Social Justice, Margot Young

Faculty Publications

This paper examines the transformative potential of section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its potential usefulness in the struggle against social and economic injustice central to Canadian society. Can section 7 of the Charter encompass the protection of social and economic rights? In other words, can section 7 be interpreted to capture the progressive goal of economic redistribution? Three separate issues are considered, each providing different perspectives on the issue. First jurisprudence (doctrine) is considered, i.e. how section 7 can encompass substantive claims to economic redistributive justice. Secondly, the institutional appropriateness and justiciability of ...