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Full-Text Articles in Law

Does The Constitution Apply To The Actions Of The United States Anti-Doping Agency?, Dionne L. Koller Oct 2005

Does The Constitution Apply To The Actions Of The United States Anti-Doping Agency?, Dionne L. Koller

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Since its formation in 2000, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has aggressively pursued athletes who are believed to have used performance-enhancing substances and has aggressively prosecuted those who ultimately test positive. To many, this is a long overdue response to the growing problem of doping in sports. But to others, USADA's actions, and the federal government's support of these efforts, has sparked enormous controversy. This article examines USADA and its relationship to the federal government to determine whether USADA's actions could be constrained by the Constitution. While it is clear that USADA has very close ties ...


'"You Have Been In Afghanistan": A Discourse On The Van Alstyne Method, Garrett Epps Apr 2005

'"You Have Been In Afghanistan": A Discourse On The Van Alstyne Method, Garrett Epps

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This essay pays tribute to William Van Alstyne, one of our foremost constitutional scholars, by applying the methods of textual interpretation he laid out in a classic essay, "Interpreting This Constitution: On the Unhelpful Contribution of Special Theories of Judicial Review." I make use of the graphical methods Van Alstyne has applied to the general study of the First Amendment to examine the Supreme Court's recent decisions in the context of the Free Exercise Clause, in particular the landmark case of "Employment Division v. Smith". The application of Van Alstyne's use of the burden of proof as an ...


A Brief History Of The Fifth Amendment Guarantee Against Double Jeopardy, David S. Rudstein Mar 2005

A Brief History Of The Fifth Amendment Guarantee Against Double Jeopardy, David S. Rudstein

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No abstract provided.


Belton Redux: Re-Evaluating Belton's Per Se Rule Governing The Search Of An Automobile Incident To An Arrest, David S. Rudstein Mar 2005

Belton Redux: Re-Evaluating Belton's Per Se Rule Governing The Search Of An Automobile Incident To An Arrest, David S. Rudstein

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No abstract provided.


The Surprisingly Strong Case For Tailoring Constitutional Principles, Mark D. Rosen Mar 2005

The Surprisingly Strong Case For Tailoring Constitutional Principles, Mark D. Rosen

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Many constitutional principles apply to more than one level of government. This is true not only of Bill of Rights guarantees that have been incorporated against the States, but of many constitutional principles whose source lies outside of the Bill of Rights. The conventional wisdom is that such multi-level constitutional principles apply identically to all levels of government. The Article's thesis is that this One-Size-Fits-All approach is problematic because the different levels of government - federal, state, and local - sometimes are sufficiently different that a given constitutional principle may apply differently to each level. This Article critically examines an alternative ...


The Innocence Protection Act Of 2004: A Small Step Forward And A Framework For Larger Reforms, Ronald Weich Mar 2005

The Innocence Protection Act Of 2004: A Small Step Forward And A Framework For Larger Reforms, Ronald Weich

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Passage of the Innocence Protection Act in the closing days of the 108th Congress was a watershed moment. To be sure, the bill that finally became law was a shadow of the more ambitious criminal justice reforms first championed five years earlier by Senator Pat Leahy, Congressman Bill Delahunt and others. But the enactment of legislation designed to strengthen — not weaken — procedural protections for death row inmates was rich in symbolic importance and promise.

Writing in the April 2001 issue of THE CHAMPION (Innocence Protection Act: Death Penalty Reform on the Horizon), I said optimistically: "The criminal justice pendulum may ...


The Pledge As Sacred Political Ritual, Sheldon Nahmod Feb 2005

The Pledge As Sacred Political Ritual, Sheldon Nahmod

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No abstract provided.


Constitutional Dialogue And The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Joel K. Goldstein Jan 2005

Constitutional Dialogue And The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Joel K. Goldstein

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The Civil Rights Act of 1964 [1] represented a seminal legislative accomplishment of the twentieth century. Its eleven titles addressed racial discrimination in voting (Title I), public accommodations (Title II), public facilities (Title III), public education (Title IV), publicly financed programs (Title VI) and employment (Title VII).[2] It sought to remedy legislatively the Jim Crow laws and practices that had long contributed to making blacks second-class citizens in America and it provided the Executive Branch tools, especially in Title III and VI, to help implement Brown v. Board of Education.[3] In view of the bill’s focus on ...