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Full-Text Articles in Law

Summary Of Shuette V. Beazer Homes Holding Corp., 121 Nev. Adv. Op. 82, Joshua Benson Jan 2005

Summary Of Shuette V. Beazer Homes Holding Corp., 121 Nev. Adv. Op. 82, Joshua Benson

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Beazer Homes constructed and sold 206 single-family residences between 1994 and 1999 on a 40-acre residential subdivision. In April 2000, three homeowners, individually, and as proposed class representatives, filed a complaint against Beazer Homes alleging constructional defects to their homes. The complaint alleged that their houses’ foundations and concrete slabs were damaged by expansive soils, a condition in which the soils beneath a house expand when exposed to water and contract when the soil dries. This condition can cause a house’s foundation and concreted slab to crack and separate. The plaintiffs also alleged over 30 additional constructional defects unrelated ...


Summary Of Cheung V. Dist. Ct., 121 Nev. Adv. Op. 83, 124 P.3d 550, Richard D. Chatwin Jan 2005

Summary Of Cheung V. Dist. Ct., 121 Nev. Adv. Op. 83, 124 P.3d 550, Richard D. Chatwin

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Plaintiff Amy Cheung was involved in a two-car accident with defendant Amber Schlauder. Cheung retained an attorney and sued Schlauder in the Las Vegas Township Justice Court, seeking $5,000 for medical expenses. Schlauder also retained an attorney and filed a motion to move the case from “small claims court to justice’s court” in order for Schlauder to receive a jury trial.2 The motion was denied by the small claims referee on the grounds that small claims court and justice court are one in the same. The referee also found Schlauder liable in the amount of $5,000 ...


Between Dependency And Liberty: The Conundrum Of Children’S Rights In The Gilded Age, David S. Tanenhaus Jan 2005

Between Dependency And Liberty: The Conundrum Of Children’S Rights In The Gilded Age, David S. Tanenhaus

Scholarly Works

Although legal scholars often assume that the history of children's rights in the United States did not begin until the mid twentieth century, this essay argues that a sophisticated conception of children's rights existed a century earlier, and analyzes how lawmakers articulated it through their attempts to define the rights of dependent children. How to handle their cases raised fundamental questions about whether children were autonomous beings or the property of either their parents and/or the state. And, if the latter, what were the limits of parental authority and/or the power of the state acting as ...


Does A Diverse Judiciary Attain A Rule Of Law That Is Inclusive? What Grutter V. Bollinger Has To Say About Diversity On The Bench, Sylvia R. Lazos Jan 2005

Does A Diverse Judiciary Attain A Rule Of Law That Is Inclusive? What Grutter V. Bollinger Has To Say About Diversity On The Bench, Sylvia R. Lazos

Scholarly Works

Race matters, but judges and courts have failed to fashion a rule of law that is inclusive of all racial perspectives and realities in the United States. The reason for this dismal performance lies in how predominantly White judges, and therefore courts, conceptualize race. This article illustrates this proposition by analyzing the Rehnquist Court's race relations jurisprudence in three Supreme Court decisions handed down in 2003: Grutter v. Bollinger,Gratz v. Bollinger,and Georgia v. Ashcroft.Even as the United States Supreme Court entered increasingly complex areas of race relations, the Court continued to apply a simplistic concept of ...