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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Delinquency Jurisdiction In A Unified Family Court: Balancing Intervention, Prevention, And Adjudication, Gloria Danziger Oct 2003

Delinquency Jurisdiction In A Unified Family Court: Balancing Intervention, Prevention, And Adjudication, Gloria Danziger

All Faculty Scholarship

This article will examine the demographics of the current juvenile delinquency caseloads and will argue that, despite trends toward greater punitive measures-including placement of juveniles in adult courts for certain offenses, the concept of a therapeutic "family-centered court," which inspired Jane Addams and her colleagues, remains the most promising approach to delinquency, articulated most notably by the proponents of the unified family court concept. The article will consider and address objections and concerns raised with respect to this approach, looking at ways in which several states have incorporated juvenile delinquency into a family-centered unified family court.


Ub Viewpoint – Changing Roles Of Fatherhood, Jane C. Murphy Jun 2003

Ub Viewpoint – Changing Roles Of Fatherhood, Jane C. Murphy

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Statewide Penetration And Standard Costs Of Psychotropic Medications, Mary R. Murrin Jun 2003

Statewide Penetration And Standard Costs Of Psychotropic Medications, Mary R. Murrin

Mental Health Law & Policy Faculty Publications

This study will examine differences in pharmaceutical utilization rates relative to financial risk arrangements of differing insurance plans. During the last four years we have noted consistent differences in utilization of expensive, psychotropic medications between individuals enrolled in Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), which are at financial risk for the provision of pharmaceuticals, and the MediPass program in which the state bears the risk of pharmacy expenses. Persons in HMOs had lower levels of utilization.


Ub Viewpoint – Creation Of A Caring Justice System, Barbara A. Babb Feb 2003

Ub Viewpoint – Creation Of A Caring Justice System, Barbara A. Babb

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Medical Treatment Of Children With Hiv Illness And The Need For Supportive Intervention: The Challenges Of Medical Providers, Families And The State, Deborah J. Weimer Jan 2003

Medical Treatment Of Children With Hiv Illness And The Need For Supportive Intervention: The Challenges Of Medical Providers, Families And The State, Deborah J. Weimer

Faculty Scholarship

Human iummuno-deficiency virus (HIV) illness in children poses tremendous challenges to medical providers and families to work together to deliver optimal care. An alternative to filing "neglect" reports with the Department of Social Services is necessary to provide support and appropriate intervention to families and medical providers caring for HIV-positive children.

The creation of a neutral entity that could intervene and identify barriers to treatment and communication between the medical providers and the family would benefit all the parties involved. Knowledgeable mediators could help facilitate communication and identify appropriate support for the child and family.

Intervention would not be delayed ...


Strangers And Brothers: A Homily On Transracial Adoption, Carl E. Schneider Jan 2003

Strangers And Brothers: A Homily On Transracial Adoption, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

The common law speaks to us in parables. Ours is Drummond v. Fulton County Department of Family and Children's Services. Just before Christmas 1973, a boy named Timmy was born to a white mother and a black father. A month later, his mother was declared unfit, and the Department of Family and Children Services placed Timmy with white foster parents - Robert and Mildred Drummond. The Drummonds were "excellent" and "loving" parents, and Timmy grew into "an extremely bright, highly verbal, outgoing 15-month baby boy." Then the Drummonds asked to adopt Timmy. The Department's reviews of the Drummonds' devotion ...


The Rise Of The Perpetual Trust, Jesse Dukeminier, James E. Krier Jan 2003

The Rise Of The Perpetual Trust, Jesse Dukeminier, James E. Krier

Articles

For more than two centuries, the Rule against Perpetuities has served as the chief means of limiting a transferor's power to tie up property by way of successive contingent interests. But recently, at least seventeen jurisdictions in the United States have enacted statutes abolishing the Rule in the case of perpetual (or near-perpetual) trusts. The prime mover behind this important development has been the federal Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax. This Article traces the gradual decline of the common law Rule against Perpetuities, considers the dynamics behind the recent wave of state legislation, examines the problems that might result from the ...


Introduction To Symposium, The Rights Of Parents With Children In Foster Care: Removals Arising From Economic Hardship And The Predicative Power Of Race, Ann Cammett Jan 2003

Introduction To Symposium, The Rights Of Parents With Children In Foster Care: Removals Arising From Economic Hardship And The Predicative Power Of Race, Ann Cammett

Scholarly Works

Professor Cammett introduces a symposium at the Association of the Bar of the City of New York exploring the predicament posed by the surge of child removals through neglect petitions, and the subsequent placement of those children in foster care. The panel’s published comments offer some poignant reflections on the crisis of the child welfare system.


Book Review, David S. Tanenhaus Jan 2003

Book Review, David S. Tanenhaus

Scholarly Works

This concise book explores the origins and early history of the Cook County Juvenile Court, the world’s first such court. The court, which opened on July 3, 1899, in Chicago, reflected its founders’ profound faith both in science to solve social problems and the power of the state to provide for the best interests of its children. Yet, as Getis argues, the juvenile court did not live up to its initial promise, and “instead of a place of experimentation and reform—which it could have been—or a place of individualized justice guided by science—perhaps an unattainable goal ...