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Series

2001

Human rights

Discipline
Institution
Publication

Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Law

The United Nations And Civil Society, Jayantha Dhanapala Apr 2001

The United Nations And Civil Society, Jayantha Dhanapala

A Cartography of Governance: Exploring the Province of Environmental NGOs (April 7-8)

7 pages.


Capital Punishment: Corporate Criminal Liability For Gross Violations Of Human Rights, Diane Marie Amann Apr 2001

Capital Punishment: Corporate Criminal Liability For Gross Violations Of Human Rights, Diane Marie Amann

Scholarly Works

These remarks were presented on February 24, 2001, in a panel concluding a conference entitled "Holding Multinational Corporations Responsible Under International Law" at Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco, California.


Effective Strategies For Protecting Human Rights: A Conference Engaging The International Community, David R. Barnhizer Apr 2001

Effective Strategies For Protecting Human Rights: A Conference Engaging The International Community, David R. Barnhizer

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Human rights protection needs teeth. And those who work in the disparate field of human rights need to see the system more comprehensively and strategically. Far too often, political issues interfere with enforcement of human rights laws and allow violators to hide behind the unwillingness of national governments to take action to enforce existing laws against human rights violators. Lack of commitment to human rights enforcement or timely preventative or intervention actions have led to violators being left unpunished for torture, rape and genocide. This failure of governments means that there is a lack of deterent power sufficient to inhibit ...


Transitional Justice In Afghanistan : Confronting Violations Of International Humanitarian And Human Rights Law, Peter G. Danchin Jan 2001

Transitional Justice In Afghanistan : Confronting Violations Of International Humanitarian And Human Rights Law, Peter G. Danchin

Faculty Scholarship

After more than two decades of war and foreign interventions, including the US-led military campaign following the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks, Afghanistan has entered a period of transition and rebuilding. It thus joins a host of other countries—from South Africa to Sierra Leone to East Timor—which have sought in recent years to move from a repressive and violent past to a future based on democracy, the rule of law and respect for fundamental human rights. In this respect, Afghanistan presents one of the most confronting case studies for the field of ‘transitional justice’. This article considers the ...


Free Trade, Fair Trade, And The Battle For Labor Rights, Lance A. Compa Jan 2001

Free Trade, Fair Trade, And The Battle For Labor Rights, Lance A. Compa

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Labor rights advocacy is the most direct challenge to the primacy of a marketplace ideology in which efficiency and profit are the highest values. Labor rights advocates promote values of fairness, justice, and solidarity in global commerce. The battle to achieve enforceable hard law that protects workers' rights in the global economy is an important contribution to the labor movement's revitalization.

Can a beleaguered movement take on multinational companies and the governments that appease them on these varied international grounds when there is so much still to do on organizing, collective bargaining, and domestic political action? There really ...


A Constitutional Confluence: American ‘State Action’ Law And The Application Of South Africa’S Socioeconomic Rights Guarantees To Private Actors, Stephen Ellmann Jan 2001

A Constitutional Confluence: American ‘State Action’ Law And The Application Of South Africa’S Socioeconomic Rights Guarantees To Private Actors, Stephen Ellmann

Articles & Chapters

As constitutional protection of human rights expands around the world, the question of whether constitutional rights should protect people not only against state action but also against the conduct of private actors is once again timely. Few nations have so broadly, or so ambiguously, endorsed the application of constitutional guarantees to constrain private conduct (known outside the United States as "horizontality") as South Africa. The constitution approved in 1996 applies fully and without qualification to all "organs of state," and this term is defined in section 239 in potentially very broad terms, notably embracing "any other functionary or institution ... exercising ...


Understanding The "Understanding": Federalism Constraints On Human Rights Implementation, Brad R. Roth Jan 2001

Understanding The "Understanding": Federalism Constraints On Human Rights Implementation, Brad R. Roth

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


On Elián And Aliens: A Political Solution To The Plenary Power Problem, Victor C. Romero Jan 2001

On Elián And Aliens: A Political Solution To The Plenary Power Problem, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The poignant story of a little boy fished out of the sea after losing his mother to the elements captured the country's imagination and ignited a political firestorm. The Elián González saga drew conflicting opinions from nearly every branch of American local, state, and federal governments.

This article takes no specific position on Elián's situation. Rather, this artivle values the González story for putting a human face on often faceless legal issues. More specifically, Elián's saga raises the following important question: When should the right of the human being to be treated as an individual trump the ...


Caretakers And Collaborators, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 2001

Caretakers And Collaborators, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

A chilling subplot in the twentieth-century saga of state-sponsored mass murder, torture, and other atrocities was the widespread incidence of medical complicity. Nazi doctors’ human “experiments” and assistance in genocidal killing are the most oft-cited exemplar, but wartime Japanese physicians’ human vivisection and other grotesque practices rivaled the Nazi medical horrors. Measured by these standards, Soviet psychiatrists’ role in repressing dissent, Latin American and Turkish military doctors’ complicity in torture, and even the South African medical profession’s systematic involvement in apartheid may seem, to some, almost prosaic. Yet these and other reported cases of medical complicity in human rights ...


Federalism And International Human Rights In The New Constitutional Order, Mark V. Tushnet Jan 2001

Federalism And International Human Rights In The New Constitutional Order, Mark V. Tushnet

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This Essay examines the contours of what I have elsewhere called the new constitutional order with respect to international human rights and federalism. The background is my suggestion that the U.S. political-constitutional system is on the verge of moving into a new constitutional regime, following the end of the New Deal-Great Society constitutional regime. The Supreme Court's innovations in the law of federalism in connection with Congress's exercise of its powers over domestic affairs has provoked speculation about the implications of those innovations for the national government's power with respect to foreign affairs. Most of the ...


A Framework Of Norms: International Human-Rights Law And Sovereignty, Douglass Cassel Jan 2001

A Framework Of Norms: International Human-Rights Law And Sovereignty, Douglass Cassel

Journal Articles

The international legal boundary between states; rights and human rights is not fixed. Long ago, the Permanent Court of International Justice - the judicial arm of the League of Nations and the precursor to the present International Court of Justice - recognized that "the question whether a certain matter is or is not solely within the jurisdiction of a State is an essentially relative question; it depends on the development of international relations." In recent decades international relations concerning both sovereignty and rights have developed quickly. An examination of those rights and the evolving realities of sovereignty are examined.


Cultural Relativism, Economic Development And International Human Rights In The Asian Context, Richard Klein Jan 2001

Cultural Relativism, Economic Development And International Human Rights In The Asian Context, Richard Klein

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Does International Human Rights Law Make A Difference?, Douglass Cassel Jan 2001

Does International Human Rights Law Make A Difference?, Douglass Cassel

Journal Articles

Does international human rights law make a difference? Does it protect rights in practice? The importance of these questions for rights protection is obvious: the institutions of international human rights law deserve our energetic support only to the extent they contribute meaningfully to protection of rights, or at least promise eventually to do so. Moreover, at the moment these questions have added urgency. They underlie an ongoing debate, fomented in part by this Journal, on the extent to which the United States should be prepared to cede degrees of its national sovereignty to international human rights institutions, in return for ...


Latinas, Culture And Human Rights: A Model For Making Change, Saving Soul, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol Jan 2001

Latinas, Culture And Human Rights: A Model For Making Change, Saving Soul, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol

UF Law Faculty Publications

This essay provides an overview of progresses achieved for women in the Americas by virtue of the use of the human rights model to further women's rights and attain betterment of their lives. Specifically, this work reviews the location of Latinas both within and outside the United States fronteras. As women of color within larger U.S. society and as women within their comunidad Latina, Latinas experience different multifaceted subordinations. A human rights model that recognizes the multidimensional nature of gendered racial discrimination and of racialized gender discrimination can serve to improve the lives of Latinas as well as ...


Property, Wealth, Inequality And Human Rights: A Formula For Reform, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol, Shelbi D. Day Jan 2001

Property, Wealth, Inequality And Human Rights: A Formula For Reform, Berta E. Hernández-Truyol, Shelbi D. Day

UF Law Faculty Publications

This essay scrutinizes the persistence of inequality in the United States through a human rights lens and grapples with the troubling disparities unearthed by two works: American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass and Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Inequality. These two highly enlightening and, simultaneously, deeply troubling and depressing books elucidate the myriad locations at which inequalities persist and the historical, social, psychological, and legal foundations of, and explications for, such disparities in the African American community.

This work proposes a human rights paradigm that provides a methodology to analyze, deconstruct and unravel ...


Terrorism And Human Rights, Michael E. Tigar Jan 2001

Terrorism And Human Rights, Michael E. Tigar

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Wto Trade Sanctions, Steve Charnovitz Jan 2001

Rethinking Wto Trade Sanctions, Steve Charnovitz

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

The paper presents an outline of the issues and a preliminary appraisal of the use of trade sanctions by the World Trade Organization (WTO) as a means of promoting compliance by parties. The WTO is unique among intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) in using trade sanctions to enforce independent adjudications. Many commentators have suggested using trade sanctions analogously in other IGOs, or alternatively broadening trade rules so that the sanctions can be used for other purposes, such as enforcing basic human rights. The paper examines the advantages and disadvantages of the use of such compliance sanctions by the WTO and concludes that ...


Ratcheting Labor Standards: Regulation For Continuous Improvement In The Global Workplace, Charles F. Sabel, Archon Fung, Dara O'Rourke Jan 2001

Ratcheting Labor Standards: Regulation For Continuous Improvement In The Global Workplace, Charles F. Sabel, Archon Fung, Dara O'Rourke

Faculty Scholarship

It is a brute fact of contemporary globalization - unmistakable as activists and journalists catalog scandal after scandal – that the very transformations making possible higher quality, cheaper products often lead to unacceptable conditions of work: brutal use of child labor, dangerous environments, punishingly long days, starvation wages, discrimination, suppression of expression and association. In all quarters, the question is not whether to address these conditions, but how.


Is The Alien Tort Statute Sacrosanct--Retaining Forum Non Conveniens In Human Rights Litigation, Aric K. Short Jan 2001

Is The Alien Tort Statute Sacrosanct--Retaining Forum Non Conveniens In Human Rights Litigation, Aric K. Short

Faculty Scholarship

I argue in this article that no reasonable basis exists to justify federal courts refusing to consider forum non conveniens arguments in cases brought under the Alient Tort Statute; in fact, good reasons exist to retain the doctrine in its undiluted form. The purpose and design of forum non conveniens make it sufficiently flexible to be invoked in even the most compelling human rights cases brought in the United States. If applied properly, the doctrine will identify ATS cases that cannot and should not be dismissed to foreign fora; however, if forum non conveniens operates as it should, it also ...


Justice In Africa: Rwanda's Genocide, Its Courts, And The Un Criminal Tribunal, Jenia I. Turner Jan 2001

Justice In Africa: Rwanda's Genocide, Its Courts, And The Un Criminal Tribunal, Jenia I. Turner

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.