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Series

2001

Discrimination

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

A Place At The Table: Bush V. Gore Through The Lens Of Race, Spencer A. Overton Jan 2001

A Place At The Table: Bush V. Gore Through The Lens Of Race, Spencer A. Overton

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Although African Americans cast a majority of ballots rejected by counting machines following the 2000 presidential election in Florida, legal academic commentators have not grappled with the significance of race in their discussions of Bush v. Gore. This Essay uses race to expose structural shortcomings of merit-based assumptions about democracy embedded in the U.S. Supreme Court's majority per curiam. The Court prohibited a manual count of imperfectly marked ballots, effectively conditioning membership in political community on individual capacity to produce a machine-readable ballot. Despite the Court's individualized focus, however, merit-based assumptions about democracy interfere primarily not with ...


Dispelling The Misconceptions Raised By The Davis Dissent, Joan E. Schaffner Jan 2001

Dispelling The Misconceptions Raised By The Davis Dissent, Joan E. Schaffner

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This article argues that the Supreme Court’s majority opinion in Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education did not do enough to explicitly assuage the dissenters’ concerns and aims to do so itself. Davis permitted liability for school districts that purposely ignore instances of student-on-student sexual harassment that deprived a student of the opportunity for education. The three issues raised by the dissent were federalism, whether the conduct at issue is sexual harassment, and First Amendment concerns about the aggressor’s speech being protected. In response, I argue that the majority opinion does not violate federalism principles, the harassment ...


Louis Brandeis And The Race Question, Christopher A. Bracey Jan 2001

Louis Brandeis And The Race Question, Christopher A. Bracey

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

We live in a culture enamored by our heroes. They are celebrated for their extraordinary accomplishments, and canonized by histories that rarely reflect the true texture of their lives. Legal academics share in these tendencies and, as a result, heroes in the law are often viewed with the same rose-colored glasses accorded to their counterparts in popular culture. The late Louis Brandeis was an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939. Born to Jewish immigrant parents, he graduated from Harvard Law School, and gained a reputation as America’s “People’s Attorney.” He ...