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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Evolutionary Analysis In Law: Some Objections Considered, Owen D. Jones Jan 2001

Evolutionary Analysis In Law: Some Objections Considered, Owen D. Jones

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This Article appears in a special issue of the Brooklyn Law Review on DNA: Lessons from the Past - Problems for the Future. It first addresses why law needs insights from behavioral biology, and then identifies and responds to a variety of structural and conceptual barriers to such evolutionary analysis in law.


Proprioception, Non-Law, And Biolegal History, Owen D. Jones Jan 2001

Proprioception, Non-Law, And Biolegal History, Owen D. Jones

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This Article explores several advantages of incorporating into law various insights from behavioral biology about how and why the brain works as it does. In particular, the Article explores the ways in which those insights can help illuminate the deep structure of human legal systems. That effort is termed "biolegal history."


The Evolution Of Irrationality, Owen D. Jones Jan 2001

The Evolution Of Irrationality, Owen D. Jones

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The place of the rational actor model in the analysis of individual and social behavior relevant to law remains unresolved. In recent years, scholars have sought frameworks to explain: a) disjunctions between seemingly rational behavior and seemingly irrational behavior; b) the origins of and influences on law-relevant preferences, and c) the nonrandom development of norms. This Article explains two components of an evolutionary framework that, building from accessible insights of behavioral biology, can encompass all three. The components are: "time-shifted rationality" and "the law of law's leverage."


Through The Lens Of The Sequence, Ellen Wright Clayton Jan 2001

Through The Lens Of The Sequence, Ellen Wright Clayton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The completion of the rough draft of the human genome is a scientific feat worthy of celebration. But the media attention that has been devoted to the Human Genome Project demonstrates that most people are not as interested in what the sequence is as in what it means for individuals and for society, for good or for ill. My purpose in writing this essay is to discuss how the project was conducted here in the United States, and some of the implications of knowing the sequence (or more aptly, a sequence).