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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Pause At The Rubicon, John Marshall And Emancipation: Reparations In The Early National Period?, Frances Howell Rudko Jan 2001

Pause At The Rubicon, John Marshall And Emancipation: Reparations In The Early National Period?, Frances Howell Rudko

Faculty Publications

Marshall thought that the solution to emancipation and the end to slavery were to be nationally funded. He considered slavery a national problem, not a state problem, as most of his fellow Virginians insisted. In this he differed from most southerners who argued that slave matters were state matters and that the nation could involve itself in the institution of slavery only by strictly adhering to the role assigned to it by the Constitution under the three fifths clause and the fugitive slave clause.


The Constitutional Case For The Impeachability Of Former Federal Officials: An Analysis Of The Law, History, And Practice Of Late Impeachment, Brian C. Kalt Jan 2001

The Constitutional Case For The Impeachability Of Former Federal Officials: An Analysis Of The Law, History, And Practice Of Late Impeachment, Brian C. Kalt

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Latin American Legal History: Some Essential Spanish Terms, M C. Mirow Jan 2001

Latin American Legal History: Some Essential Spanish Terms, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

Terms related to Latin American legal history translated into English.


Congress As Culprit: How Lawmakers Spurred On The Court's Anti-Congress Crusade, Neal Devins Jan 2001

Congress As Culprit: How Lawmakers Spurred On The Court's Anti-Congress Crusade, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Globalization And Legal Education: Views From The Outside-In, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2001

Globalization And Legal Education: Views From The Outside-In, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

During the past two decades a new, global, legal professionalism has manifested itself in the field of legal education through a variety of programmes seeking to produce globally-aware or globally-connected lawyers. This paper explores the diverse meanings of globalization and legal education with particular attention to the differential effects of globalization and the varied experiences of it in different parts of the world. Taking its starting point from a Nigerian graduate student's insight that globalization means 'The White Man is Coming again'. What does he want this time?, he explores both American and international perspectives.