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Full-Text Articles in Law

Walter Mickens, Jr. V. John B. Taylor, Warden, Lawrence Fox Jul 2001

Walter Mickens, Jr. V. John B. Taylor, Warden, Lawrence Fox

Amicus Briefs

No abstract provided.


Multiracial Matrix: The Role Of Race Ideology In The Enforcement Of Antidiscrimination Laws, A United States-Latin America Comparison, Tanya K. Hernandez Jan 2001

Multiracial Matrix: The Role Of Race Ideology In The Enforcement Of Antidiscrimination Laws, A United States-Latin America Comparison, Tanya K. Hernandez

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the role of race ideology in the enforcement of antidiscrimination laws. Professor Hernandez demonstrates the ways in which the U.S. race ideology is slowly starting to resemble the race ideology of much of Latin America. The evolving U.S. race ideology is a multiracial matrix made up of four precepts: (1) racial mixture and diverse racial demography will resolve racial problems; (2) fluid racial classification schemes are an indicator of racial progress and the colorblind abolition of racial classifications an indicator of absolute racial harmony; (3) racism is solely a phenomenon of aberrant racist individuals; and ...


1977 Code Of Ethics For Arbitrators: An Outside Perspective, The Symposium: Ethics In A World Of Mandatory Arbitration, John D. Feerick Jan 2001

1977 Code Of Ethics For Arbitrators: An Outside Perspective, The Symposium: Ethics In A World Of Mandatory Arbitration, John D. Feerick

Faculty Scholarship

If ADR is to remain a vibrant part of the judicial landscape, it is essential that efforts further shape ethical standards and guidelines, as well as their practical connotations. The framers of the United States Constitution were very careful to establish a public justice system comprised of judges and juries operating within a framework of standards and protections designed to assure justice and fairness while simultaneously promoting public confidence. We should give similar care to developing processes through which we purportedly intend to accomplish similar objectives in resolving disputes and controversies. At the very least, the private nature of these ...


Dissing Congress , Ruth Colker, James J. Brudney Jan 2001

Dissing Congress , Ruth Colker, James J. Brudney

Faculty Scholarship

This article adopts a novel separation of powers framework to analyze the Rehnquist Court's recent decisions under the Commerce Clause and Section Five of the Fourteenth Amendment. We demonstrate in historical terms how the Court's methods for assessing the constitutional adequacy of federal laws have changed dramatically since the mid-1990s, and we argue that these new methods are undermining the proper role of Congress and producing a significant shift in the balance of power between the Branches. We identify two distinct methodologies employed by the Rehnquist Court that have resulted in growing disrespect for Congress - the "crystal ball ...


The Restatement (Third) And The Place Of Duty In Negligence Law, Benjamin C. Zipursky Jan 2001

The Restatement (Third) And The Place Of Duty In Negligence Law, Benjamin C. Zipursky

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Testing Multiple Intelligences: Comparing Evaluation By Simulation And Written Exam , Ian Weinstein Jan 2001

Testing Multiple Intelligences: Comparing Evaluation By Simulation And Written Exam , Ian Weinstein

Faculty Scholarship

Written examinations play a key role in legal education. The LSAT is the most important factor in law school admissions. Once students enroll in law school, exams are used to evaluate and sort first year students. At most American law schools, a single, end of semester or end of year, timed, written, in class exam determines the grade in each first year class.' Although exams continue to play a major role throughout law school, once students are sorted at the end of first year it is often difficult for them to significantly change their place in the law school hierarchy ...


Unnecessary Privacy , Carl Felsenfeld Jan 2001

Unnecessary Privacy , Carl Felsenfeld

Faculty Scholarship

An individual's right to privacy in an electronic society has gained international attention as a booming new field. Its birth may roughly be marked to coincide with the birth of the Internet. The flow of information without limit or boundary has raised concerns with the consumer spokespeople in the Western World that personal information about them may flow as easily as general information about Machu Pichu, Keynesian economics, or Harvard College. The fear is that will cause individuals harm, ranging from personal embarrassment to a loss of civil liberties. Therefore, movements are developing to limit this flow of information ...


Limitation Of Shipowner Liability: Its American Roots And Some Problems Particular To Collision, Joseph Sweeney Jan 2001

Limitation Of Shipowner Liability: Its American Roots And Some Problems Particular To Collision, Joseph Sweeney

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Thoughts About Corporate Lawyers After Reading The Cigarette Papers: Has The "Wise Counselor" Given Way To The "Hired Gun"?", Bruce A. Green Jan 2001

Thoughts About Corporate Lawyers After Reading The Cigarette Papers: Has The "Wise Counselor" Given Way To The "Hired Gun"?", Bruce A. Green

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Yahoo And Democracy On The Internet, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2001

Yahoo And Democracy On The Internet, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This article examines the French court order requiring Yahoo to prevent French Internet users from accessing images of Nazi memorabilia available for auction on the company's American web site. The article uses the French case to challenge the popular belief that an entirely borderless Internet favors democratic values. The article starts from the premise that while the Internet enables actors to reach a geographically dispersed audience, the Internet should not change the accountability of those actors for their conduct within national borders. The article shows that Yahoo's extensive business in France justifies the application of France's democratically ...


Designated Diffidence: District Court Judges On The Courts Of Appeals Papers Of General Interest, James J. Brudney, Corey Distlear Jan 2001

Designated Diffidence: District Court Judges On The Courts Of Appeals Papers Of General Interest, James J. Brudney, Corey Distlear

Faculty Scholarship

Since 1980, District CourtJudges, designated pursuant to federal statute, have helped decide over 75,000 court of appeals cases-nearly one of every five merits decisions. Although scholars and judges have warned that the presence of these visitors on appellate panels may undermine consistency, legitimacy, or collegiality, little empirical evidence exists related to such concerns. Working with an especially complete data set of labor law opinions, the authors found that district court visitors perform in a much more diffident fashion than their appellate colleagues. They contribute notably fewer majority opinions and dissents. In addition, their participations do not reflect their professional ...


Making Sense Of The Eleventh Amendment: International Law And State Sovereignty, Thomas H. Lee Jan 2001

Making Sense Of The Eleventh Amendment: International Law And State Sovereignty, Thomas H. Lee

Faculty Scholarship

The Judicial Power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State. - Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America The thesis of this article is that the Eleventh Amendment, ratified in 1798, represented the incorporation into the American domestic constitutional law of federalism (specifically, the doctrine of state sovereign immunity) the late eighteenth-century international law rule that only states have rights against other states on ...


Next Challenge In Sexual Harassment Reform: Racial Disparity, The Panel One: Gender, Race, And Sexuality: Historical Themes And Emerging Issues In Women's Rights Law, Tanya K. Hernandez Jan 2001

Next Challenge In Sexual Harassment Reform: Racial Disparity, The Panel One: Gender, Race, And Sexuality: Historical Themes And Emerging Issues In Women's Rights Law, Tanya K. Hernandez

Faculty Scholarship

In order to do my homework in discussing both a tribute to women's lawyering and activism and also discuss emerging issues, I am going to focus on sexual harassment.


E-Commerce And Trans-Atlantic Privacy, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2001

E-Commerce And Trans-Atlantic Privacy, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

For almost a decade, the United States and Europe have anticipated a clash over the protection of personal information. Between the implementation in Europe of comprehensive legal protections pursuant to the directive on data protection and the continued reliance on industry self-regulation in the United States, trans-Atlantic privacy policies have been at odds with each other. The rapid growth in e-commerce is now sparking the long-anticipated trans-Atlantic privacy clash. This Article will first look at the context of American e-commerce and the disjuncture between citizens' privacy and business practices. The Article will then turn to the international context and explore ...


Towards A Practice Of Deliberative Democracy: A Proposal For A Popular Branch , Ethan J. Leib Jan 2001

Towards A Practice Of Deliberative Democracy: A Proposal For A Popular Branch , Ethan J. Leib

Faculty Scholarship

Proposals for practical institutional reforms are notoriously absent from discussions about deliberative democracy. It is imperative to engage in the “nuts and bolts” debate of just what kinds of changes we discourse theorists or deliberative democrats want to effect. Here I would like to try to synthesize a reform proposal of my own based upon three major assumptions. Without argument, I assume a largely discourse-theoretic view of democracy that takes for granted the republican virtue of collective self-government as well as the Kantian claim that each citizen should be the author of his own laws. I further assume that our ...


Lawyers As America's Governing Class: The Formation And Dissolution Of The Original Understanding Of The American Lawyer's Role, Russell G. Pearce Jan 2001

Lawyers As America's Governing Class: The Formation And Dissolution Of The Original Understanding Of The American Lawyer's Role, Russell G. Pearce

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Comments On William Whitford's Paper On The Role Of The Jury (And The Fact/Law Distinction) In The Interpretation Of Written Contracts, Joseph Perillo Jan 2001

Comments On William Whitford's Paper On The Role Of The Jury (And The Fact/Law Distinction) In The Interpretation Of Written Contracts, Joseph Perillo

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Stalking Secret Law: What Predicts Publication In The United States Courts Of Appeals , Deborah J. Merritt, James J. Brudney Jan 2001

Stalking Secret Law: What Predicts Publication In The United States Courts Of Appeals , Deborah J. Merritt, James J. Brudney

Faculty Scholarship

Nearly four fifths of federal court of appeals opinions are unpublished. For more than 25 years, judges and scholars have debated the wisdom and fairness of this body of "secret" law. The debate over unpublished opinions recently intensified when the Eighth Circuit held that the Constitution requires courts to give these opinions precedential value. Despite continued controversy over unpublished opinions, limited empirical evidence exists on the nature of those opinions. Working with an especially complete dataset of labor law opinions and multivariate statistical methods, we were able to identify the factors that predict publication. Some of those factors, such as ...


Bar Association Ethics Committees: Are They Broken Conference On Legal Ethics: What Needs Fixing, Bruce A. Green Jan 2001

Bar Association Ethics Committees: Are They Broken Conference On Legal Ethics: What Needs Fixing, Bruce A. Green

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the work of bar association ethics committees. These are committees established by bar associations to give advice to lawyers about how to comply with the applicable rules of professional conduct. My question is, are these committees broken? Over the past two decades, several legal academics have concluded that they are. At its harshest, the critique is that ethics committees, typified by the American Bar Association's ("ABA") ethics committee, publish opinions that respond to trivial questions by providing poorly reasoned answers on which nobody can or does rely, and that the reason that the committees' opinions are ...


Reflections On The Ethics Of Legal Academics: Law Schools As Mdps; Or, Should Law Professors Practice What They Teach Symposium: Ethics Of Law Professors, Bruce A. Green Jan 2001

Reflections On The Ethics Of Legal Academics: Law Schools As Mdps; Or, Should Law Professors Practice What They Teach Symposium: Ethics Of Law Professors, Bruce A. Green

Faculty Scholarship

[A member of the House of Commons said in Samuel Johnson's presence] that he paid no regard to the arguments of counsel at the bar of the House of Commons, because they were paid for speaking. JOHNSON. 'Nay, Sir, argument is argument. You cannot help paying regard to their arguments, if they are good, If it were testimony, you might disregard it, if you knew that it were purchased. There is a beautiful image in Bacon upon this subject: testimony is like an arrow shot from a long bow; the force of it depends on the hand that draws ...


Faith And The Lawyer's Practice Symposium: Law Religion And The Public Good, Russell G. Pearce Jan 2001

Faith And The Lawyer's Practice Symposium: Law Religion And The Public Good, Russell G. Pearce

Faculty Scholarship

If there is a religious way to read, is there a religious way to be a lawyer? More and more lawyers, judges and scholars are answering yes to that question. We heard earlier from Cardinal Bevilacqua about the history of the Religious Lawyering Movement, which blossomed in the 1990s. There was writing about the law and religion before that time." We can date religious lawyering as a body of work in mainstream legal literature, as Cardinal Bevilacqua did, to the work of Professor Thomas Shaffer in the 1980s.Why did this movement take off in the 1990s? Again, what accounts ...


Lawyer And Public Service, The Historical Perspectives On Pro Bono Lawyering, Russell G. Pearce Jan 2001

Lawyer And Public Service, The Historical Perspectives On Pro Bono Lawyering, Russell G. Pearce

Faculty Scholarship

Historically, the first way of viewing the lawyer's role was as a member of America's governing class. Second came cause lawyering on behalf of a particular issue. Third, and most recently, arose the idea of pro bono lawyering, a less ambitious incarnation of the governing class lawyer who contributes time to helping cause lawyers. These categories are not rigid: for each individual they may overlap to one degree or another. This framework is preliminary and requires further research and development. Nonetheless, it provides a useful tool for explaining how lawyers-and in particular the heroic lawyers described in this ...


Dialogic Federalism: Constitutional Possibilities For Incorporation Of Human Rights Law In The United States Social Movements And Law Reform, Catherine Powell Jan 2001

Dialogic Federalism: Constitutional Possibilities For Incorporation Of Human Rights Law In The United States Social Movements And Law Reform, Catherine Powell

Faculty Scholarship

Discussions about the allocation of authority between federal and subfederal systems in the implementation of international human rights law typically proceed by staking out one of two initial positions. At one end of the spectrum, a traditional constitutional theory takes a restrictive view of state and local authority, envisioning hierarchical imposition of federally implemented international law norms through the federal treaty power and determination of customary international law by federal courts. At the other end of the spectrum, a revisionist theory assumes greater fragmentation and authority reserved to the states based on federalism and separation of powers limits on federal ...


The Uniform State Law Process: Will The Uma And Ruaa Be Adopted By The States?, James J. Brudney Jan 2001

The Uniform State Law Process: Will The Uma And Ruaa Be Adopted By The States?, James J. Brudney

Faculty Scholarship

Most practicing attorneys and legal academics first become aware of uniform statutes when studying the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) in law school. Yet the UCC's widespread acceptance and periodic renewal are not the legacy that generally attends uniform law ventures This overview of the uniform statutory process offers some perspective for proponents of the recently approved Uniform Mediation Act (UMA) and Revised Uniform Arbitration Act (RUAA) as they attempt to secure enactment in multiple state legislatures.