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Full-Text Articles in Law

Eldred V. Reno: An Example Of The Law Of Unintended Consequences, L. Ray Patterson Apr 2001

Eldred V. Reno: An Example Of The Law Of Unintended Consequences, L. Ray Patterson

Scholarly Works

In Eldred v. Reno the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit held that the Copyright Term Extension Act (CTEA), which extends the copyright term for present and future works for twenty years, was a constitutional exercise of Congress's copyright power. The CTEA thus puts an end (at least for two decades) to a policy in effect for more than two centuries, since the Copyright Act of 1790, that the copyright of a work expires at the end of a stated term defined at the time the copyright was granted. Since works were copyrighted annually, the ...


Allchin’S Folly: Exploring Some Myths About Open Source Software, Joe Miller Jan 2001

Allchin’S Folly: Exploring Some Myths About Open Source Software, Joe Miller

Scholarly Works

The twists and turns in the government’s antitrust case against Microsoft – from the D.C. Circuit’s stormy questioning at the two day oral argument in late February 2001 to its affirmance of the lion’s share of the government’s case in June 2001, and then from the settlement between the United States and Microsoft to the continuing battle by nine states for tougher sanctions – have garnered their share of press attention. But the high-profile antitrust case has not been the only Microsoft-centered controversy during the past year. Another involves the open source software movement about which Microsoft ...


Authorship, Dominance, And The Captive Collaborator: Preserving The Rights Of Joint Authors, Mary Lafrance Jan 2001

Authorship, Dominance, And The Captive Collaborator: Preserving The Rights Of Joint Authors, Mary Lafrance

Scholarly Works

For copyright purposes, determining whether a work has a single author or joint authors is important for a variety of reasons. Perhaps the most significant legal consequence of joint authorship is joint ownership, under which the authors enjoy equal and undivided ownership of the copyright, allowing each to exploit the work freely, subject to a duty to account to the others for a ratable share of the exploitation profits. Absent an agreement to the contrary, each author of a joint work has an equal claim to those profits and an equal right to exploit the work, even if the authors ...