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Full-Text Articles in Law

Stepparents, Biologic Parents, And The Law's Perception Of 'Family' After Divorce, David L. Chambers Jan 1990

Stepparents, Biologic Parents, And The Law's Perception Of 'Family' After Divorce, David L. Chambers

Book Chapters

The drama of divorce always contains at least two characters, a woman and a man, and often a third, a child born to the woman and the man. If you have read the other chapters of this book, you have rarely encountered any of the other persons who may be affected by a divorce, such as the children of either person from a prior marriage, or later spouses or partners of either party, or later born children of either party-all the persons who are or become stepchildren or stepparents. You have not encountered them because, in this country, with minor ...


Spousal Probate Rights In A Multiple-Marriage Society, Lawrence W. Waggoner Jan 1990

Spousal Probate Rights In A Multiple-Marriage Society, Lawrence W. Waggoner

Other Publications

Nearly everyone knows about the transformation of the American family that has taken place over the last couple of decades. The changes comprise one of the great events of our age-from the latter half of the 1970's into the present. Articles on one aspect or another of the phenomenon frequent the popular press, and a special edition of Newsweek was recently devoted to the topic. The traditional "Leave It To Beaver" family no longer prevails in American marriage behavior. To be sure, the wage-earning husband, the homemaking and child-rearing wife, and their two joint children-this type of family still ...


An Analysis Of The Myths That Bolster Efforts To Rewrite Rico And The Various Proposals For Reform: Mother Of God - Is This The End Of Rico?, George Robert Blakey Professor, Thomas A. Perry Jan 1990

An Analysis Of The Myths That Bolster Efforts To Rewrite Rico And The Various Proposals For Reform: Mother Of God - Is This The End Of Rico?, George Robert Blakey Professor, Thomas A. Perry

Journal Articles

In 1970 Congress enacted the Organized Crime Control Act, Title IX of which is known as the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO. At first, the Department of Justice moved slowly to use RICO in criminal prosecutions. Today, RICO is the prosecutor's tool of choice in organized crime, political corruption, white-collar crime, terrorism, and neo-Nazi and anti-Semitic hate group prosecutions. The Department of Justice also is implementing the civil provisions of the Act. The private bar did not begin to bring civil RICO suits until about 1975. When it did, a firestorm of controversy broke out, and ...


The Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities: The Rationale Of The 90-Year Waiting Period, Lawrence W. Waggoner Jan 1990

The Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities: The Rationale Of The 90-Year Waiting Period, Lawrence W. Waggoner

Articles

The Uniform Law Commissioners promulgated the Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities in 1986. The perpetuity-reform efforts of the American Law Institute in the Restatement (Second) inspired the Uniform Act. The Restatement and the Uniform Act employ the so-called wait-and-see approach to perpetuity reform. Wait-and-see is a two-step strategy. Step One preserves the validating side of the common-law Rule Against Perpetuities (the common-law Rule): By satisfying the common-law Rule, a nonvested future interest in property is valid at the moment of its creation. Step Two is a salvage strategy for future interests that would have been invalid at common law: Rather ...


The Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities: Oregon Joins Up, Lawrence W. Waggoner Jan 1990

The Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities: Oregon Joins Up, Lawrence W. Waggoner

Articles

Uniform perpetuity reform is on the march, and Oregon has joined the parade. On January 1, 1990, the Uniform Statutory Rule Against Perpetuities (Uniform Act) became effective in Oregon. Although promulgated only three years ago, the Uniform Act has been enacted in over twenty percent of the states and appears to be on its way toward enactment in several others. Prior to the adoption of the Uniform Act, Oregon followed the common-law Rule Against Perpetuities (common-law Rule). Noted for its unjust consequences, the common-law Rule disregards actual events and invalidates a contingent (nonvested) future interest merely on the grounds of ...