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Full-Text Articles in Law

Reflections On Racism And World Order, Winston P. Nagan Oct 2002

Reflections On Racism And World Order, Winston P. Nagan

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article is about international racism. Racism is not simply a local or national phenomenon, it is an immense global problem. Indeed, its tentacles stretch from the local to the global and back to the local. Let us put the picture of international racism into perspective by tying it to the claims made to eradicate racism in economic relations. Apart from affirmative action, there are two other approaches: either to assert the notion that reparations is a way to ameliorate the worst manifestations of racism and provide for racial justice, or to join that with the notion that there is ...


The Anticanonical Lesson Of Huckleberry Finn, Sharon E. Rush Jul 2002

The Anticanonical Lesson Of Huckleberry Finn, Sharon E. Rush

UF Law Faculty Publications

Some books included in the canon of American literature no longer belong there, because they presently lack normative approval. Adapting concepts found in constitutional law, an anticanon of American literature functions the way the anticanon of constitutional law would operate and explicitly removes books from the canon. In law, the anticanon identifies outdated interpretations of the constitution. In education, it is time to consider removing from the canon and placing in an anticanon books that are inconsistent with multicultural education. One such book is Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, which is part of the canon of American literature and viewed ...


The Child As Other: Race And Differential Treatment In The Juvenile Justice System, Kenneth B. Nunn Jan 2002

The Child As Other: Race And Differential Treatment In The Juvenile Justice System, Kenneth B. Nunn

UF Law Faculty Publications

The juvenile justice system is rife with disparities between white and non-white children. African American children are not the only ones who may be treated as the "other" inthe juvenile justice system. Latino, Native American, Asian, and even white children may be "othered" in the appropriate social context. This article focuses on African American children and their condition, because it is exemplary of how all children who are perceived as children of the "other" are treated and because, in some ways, the treatment of African American children, in a bipolar racial hierarchy, is unique.