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Full-Text Articles in Law

Civil Society And International Organizations: A Liberal Framework For Global Governance, Francesca E. Bignami Aug 2007

Civil Society And International Organizations: A Liberal Framework For Global Governance, Francesca E. Bignami

Faculty Scholarship

An earlier draft of this Article was presented at a faculty workshop at the University of Illinois College of Law. (Author's Manuscript, March 2005) This analysis of how civil society can contribute to a better system of global governance draws on the political philosophy of civil society and the comparative law of democracy. Its first part describes the civil society phenomenon in three different international organizations: the World Bank, the World Trade Organization, and the European Union. Part Two puts forward the moral principle upon which my argument rests: liberal democracy. The next part sets the stage for the ...


Disloyal Agents, Deborah A. Demott Jan 2007

Disloyal Agents, Deborah A. Demott

Faculty Scholarship

This paper examines the consequences of an agent's breach of the fiduciary duty of loyalty. These consequences are underexplored in academic literature, in contrast to rationales for fiduciary duties more generally. The consequences of an agent's disloyalty are, moreover, not uniform across jurisdictions. The paper begins by differentiating between the meaning and consequences that the law ascribes to agency and its meaning in other academic disciplines, including economics and philosophy. It then considers the extent to which principles derived from contract and tort law can account for the consequences that courts assign to agents' disloyal conduct and concludes ...


Beware The ‘Monological Imperatives’: Scholarly Writing For The Reader, Joan A. Magat Jan 2007

Beware The ‘Monological Imperatives’: Scholarly Writing For The Reader, Joan A. Magat

Faculty Scholarship

This article describes principles of effective academic writing - offered not as edicts, but as guidelines - for legal scholars in particular. The overall focus is style, but the discussion begins with observations of format. These are followed by a few stylistic principles that govern clear and effective writing. None of these principles is a revelation to the student of method or to the accomplished writer. But for the academic writer less focused on or less familiar with such principles, being aware of and practicing them can clear the fog from syntax, illuminate the writer's thesis and its development, and help ...


The State-Created Danger Doctrine, Erwin Chemerinsky Jan 2007

The State-Created Danger Doctrine, Erwin Chemerinsky

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Contracts Without Law: Sovereign Versus Corporate Debt, Mitu Gulati, George G. Triantis Jan 2007

Contracts Without Law: Sovereign Versus Corporate Debt, Mitu Gulati, George G. Triantis

Faculty Scholarship

Although extralegal enforcement is widely acknowledged, the conventional understanding of written contract provisions, such as the complex and detailed provisions in bond contracts, is that they are drafted to be enforced by law. This framing neglects the value of contracts in shaping extralegal forces, particularly where litigation is unlikely or not possible. Sovereign debt contracts provide an example in which lengthy and detailed contracts play a key role even though the debtor is largely litigation-proof. We examine how contract provisions in sovereign debt contracts improve the efficiency of creditor control outside the realm of legal enforcement.


Ranking Judges According To Citation Bias, Mitu Gulati, Stephen J. Choi Jan 2007

Ranking Judges According To Citation Bias, Mitu Gulati, Stephen J. Choi

Faculty Scholarship

In our Essay, we put forward a methodology to assess the amount of political bias that affects judges based on the decisions judges make on whom to cite in their opinions. Unlike prior studies looking at judicial bias that focus on judicial voting outcomes, our study of bias in citation practices is aimed at uncovering more subtle forms of bias. Judges may shy away from acting overly biased when making a highly visible decision such as voting in a particular case, but instead seek to shift the law more subtly through their reasoning and citation patterns in the opinion, thereby ...


The Many Uses Of Federalism, Donald L. Horowitz Jan 2007

The Many Uses Of Federalism, Donald L. Horowitz

Faculty Scholarship

This paper forms part of a symposium on Sanford Levinson's Our Undemocratic Constitution. It points out that although almost no large state that is governed democratically is not a federation, there are only about 24 federations in the world and all but four of these antedate the Third Wave of Democratization, which began in 1974. Most new democracies have not found federalism attractive. Yet, for many such countries, devolution (or scaling-down) federalism, in contrast to the scaling-up federalism originally devised in 1787, has great potential to alleviate conflicts in severely divided societies. Many of these are small or medium-sized ...


Following The Script: An Empirical Analysis Of Court-Ordered Mediation Of Medical Malpractice Cases, Thomas B. Metzloff, Ralph A. Peeples, Catherine T. Harris Jan 2007

Following The Script: An Empirical Analysis Of Court-Ordered Mediation Of Medical Malpractice Cases, Thomas B. Metzloff, Ralph A. Peeples, Catherine T. Harris

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Reverse Notice And Takedown Regime To Enable Public Interest Uses Of Technically Protected Copyrighted Works, Jerome H. Reichman, Graeme B. Dinwoodie, Pamela Samuelson Jan 2007

A Reverse Notice And Takedown Regime To Enable Public Interest Uses Of Technically Protected Copyrighted Works, Jerome H. Reichman, Graeme B. Dinwoodie, Pamela Samuelson

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Some Notes On Principled Pragmatism, Christopher H. Schroeder Jan 2007

Some Notes On Principled Pragmatism, Christopher H. Schroeder

Faculty Scholarship

Symposium dedicated to the work of Professor Paul J. Mishkin. This article examines several articles by Mishkin. One of the ideas developed here stresses the importance of being mindful of the wider context within which the Supreme Court operates.


Stalking The Yeti: Protective Jurisdiction, Foreign Affairs Removal, And Complete Preemption, Ernest A. Young Jan 2007

Stalking The Yeti: Protective Jurisdiction, Foreign Affairs Removal, And Complete Preemption, Ernest A. Young

Faculty Scholarship

Symposium dedicated to the work of Professor Paul J. Mishkin. This essay explores the Mishkin's theory of protective jurisdiction and applyies it to contemporary controversies.


The Theory And Practice Of Tax Reform, Lawrence A. Zelenak Jan 2007

The Theory And Practice Of Tax Reform, Lawrence A. Zelenak

Faculty Scholarship

Reviewing, President's Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform, Simple, Fair, and Pro-Growth: Proposals to Fix America's Tax System (2005).By The President’s Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform. 2005. Available at: http://www.taxreformpanel.gov/final-report/


What Statutes Mean: Interpretive Lessons From Positive Theories Of Communication And Legislation, Cheryl Boudreau, Arthur Lupia, Mathew D. Mccubbins, Daniel B. Rodriguez Jan 2007

What Statutes Mean: Interpretive Lessons From Positive Theories Of Communication And Legislation, Cheryl Boudreau, Arthur Lupia, Mathew D. Mccubbins, Daniel B. Rodriguez

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Introductory Remarks: The Relationship Of Law And Morality In Respect To Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne Jan 2007

Introductory Remarks: The Relationship Of Law And Morality In Respect To Constitutional Law, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Scholarship

This article explores the consequences of a Constitution not entirely aligned with moral law. These remarks encourage all legal minds to acknowledge such gaps when they are found, although there are a variety of ways in which such acknowledgment may take shape.


Corrective Justice And Liability For Global Warming, Matthew D. Adler Jan 2007

Corrective Justice And Liability For Global Warming, Matthew D. Adler

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Policy Analysis For Natural Hazards: Some Cautionary Lessons From Environmental Policy Analysis, Matthew D. Adler Jan 2007

Policy Analysis For Natural Hazards: Some Cautionary Lessons From Environmental Policy Analysis, Matthew D. Adler

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Economic Growth And The Interests Of Future (And Past And Present) Generations: A Comment On Tyler Cowen, Matthew D. Adler Jan 2007

Economic Growth And The Interests Of Future (And Past And Present) Generations: A Comment On Tyler Cowen, Matthew D. Adler

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A System Of Wholesale Denial Of Rights, Michael E. Tigar Jan 2007

A System Of Wholesale Denial Of Rights, Michael E. Tigar

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Immigration Law And The Regulation Of Marriage, Kerry Abrams Jan 2007

Immigration Law And The Regulation Of Marriage, Kerry Abrams

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Mae Ngai's Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens And The Making Of Modern America, Kerry Abrams Jan 2007

Mae Ngai's Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens And The Making Of Modern America, Kerry Abrams

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Geographic Variation In Informed Consent Law: Two Standards For Disclosure Of Treatment Risks, David M. Studdert, Michelle M. Mello, Marin K. Levy, Russell L. Gruen, Edward J. Dunn, E. John Orav, Troyen A. Brennan Jan 2007

Geographic Variation In Informed Consent Law: Two Standards For Disclosure Of Treatment Risks, David M. Studdert, Michelle M. Mello, Marin K. Levy, Russell L. Gruen, Edward J. Dunn, E. John Orav, Troyen A. Brennan

Faculty Scholarship

We analyzed 714 jury verdicts in informed consent cases tried in 25 states in 1985–2002 to determine whether the applicable standard of care (“patient” vs. “professional” standard) affected the outcome. Verdicts for plaintiffs were significantly more frequent in states with a patient standard than in states with a professional standard (27 percent vs. 17 percent, P = 0.02). This difference in outcomes did not hold for other types of medical malpractice litigation (36 percent vs. 37 percent, P = 0.8). The multivariate odds of a plaintiff’s verdict were more than twice as high in states with a patient ...


Structural Reform Prosecution, Brandon L. Garrett Jan 2007

Structural Reform Prosecution, Brandon L. Garrett

Faculty Scholarship

In what I call a structural reform prosecution, prosecutors secure the cooperation of an organization in adopting internal reforms. No scholars have considered the problem of prosecutors seeking structural reform remedies, perhaps because until recently organizational prosecutions were themselves infrequent. In the past few years, however, federal prosecutors adopted a bold new prosecutorial strategy under which dozens of leading corporations entered into demanding settlements, including AIG, American Online, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Computer Associates, HealthSouth, KPMG, MCI, Merrill Lynch & Co, Monsanto, and Time Warner. To situate the DOJ's latest strategy, I frame alternatives to the pursuit of structural reform remedies ...


Aggregation In Criminal Law, Brandon L. Garrett Jan 2007

Aggregation In Criminal Law, Brandon L. Garrett

Faculty Scholarship

This Article considers aggregation in criminal law. In criminal law, fundamental constitutional rights to an individual day in court sharply limit the occurrence of procedural aggregation, such as joinder, during trials. By way of contrast, in civil cases, courts permit a range of aggregate litigation, including consolidation and class actions. Nevertheless, the boundaries between civil and criminal law approaches to aggregation are more permeable than conventionally understood. Courts now aggregate criminal cases, and they do so without violating constitutional rights, by joining cases only before trial and during appeals. I present five case studies examining novel aggregative procedures that courts ...


United States V. Goliath, Brandon L. Garrett Jan 2007

United States V. Goliath, Brandon L. Garrett

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Book Review, Jennifer L. Behrens Jan 2007

Book Review, Jennifer L. Behrens

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Human Genetics Studies: The Case For Group Rights, Laura S. Underkuffler Jan 2007

Human Genetics Studies: The Case For Group Rights, Laura S. Underkuffler

Faculty Scholarship

With the importance of genetic information has come bitter battles over its control. In these battles, some principles have emerged that are beyond dispute. The ability of individuals to control the disposition and genetic testing of their own biological materials is (as a matter of theory, at least) beyond question. No one would argue today that an individual could be subject to genetic testing for studies against her will, or that biological samples obtained from individuals under specified conditions could be simply deemed "free" of such conditions by researchers. Although difficult problems remain in the interpretation of research agreements, the ...


Explaining The Value Of Transactional Lawyering, Steven L. Schwarcz Jan 2007

Explaining The Value Of Transactional Lawyering, Steven L. Schwarcz

Faculty Scholarship

This article attempts to explain empirically the value that lawyers add when acting as counsel to parties in business transactions. Contrary to existing scholarship, which is based mostly on theory, this article shows that transactional lawyers add value primarily by reducing regulatory costs, thereby challenging the reigning models of transactional lawyers as "transaction cost engineers" and "reputational intermediaries." This new model not only helps inform contract theory but also reveals a profoundly different vision than those of existing models for the future of legal education and the profession.


Synthetic Biology: Caught Between Property Rights, The Public Domain, And The Commons, Arti K. Rai, James Boyle Jan 2007

Synthetic Biology: Caught Between Property Rights, The Public Domain, And The Commons, Arti K. Rai, James Boyle

Faculty Scholarship

Synthetic biologists aim to make biology a true engineering discipline. In the same way that electrical engineers rely on standard capacitors and resistors, or computer programmers rely on modular blocks of code, synthetic biologists wish to create an array of modular biological parts that can be readily synthesized and mixed together in different combinations. Synthetic biology has already produced important results, including more accurate AIDS tests and the possibility of unlimited supplies of previously scarce drugs for malaria. Proponents hope to use synthetic organisms to produce not only medically relevant chemicals but also a large variety of industrial materials, including ...


Testing The Testimonial Concept And Exceptions To Confrontation: “A Little Child Shall Lead Them”, Robert P. Mosteller Jan 2007

Testing The Testimonial Concept And Exceptions To Confrontation: “A Little Child Shall Lead Them”, Robert P. Mosteller

Faculty Scholarship

In Crawford v. Washington (2004), the Supreme Court radically transformed the analysis of the Confrontation Clause for hearsay, but left many specific questions unanswered. Two years later in Davis v. Washington (2006), it revisited the subject and answered a few of the unresolved issues, but again left much in doubt, apparently reorienting the focus of the testimonial definition from that of the party making the statement to that of the person receiving it. One of the areas where the new doctrine has greatest potential importance is in cases involving children, particularly cases involving physical and sexual abuse. The importance derives ...


Is Corporate Criminal Liability Unique?, Sara Sun Beale Jan 2007

Is Corporate Criminal Liability Unique?, Sara Sun Beale

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.