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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Hormone Replacement Therapy, Or Just Eat More Meat: The Technological Hare Vs. The Regulatory Tortoise, Leticia M. Diaz Jan 2000

Hormone Replacement Therapy, Or Just Eat More Meat: The Technological Hare Vs. The Regulatory Tortoise, Leticia M. Diaz

Faculty Scholarship

Is meat with its high fat content the real culprit, or is it the FDA-approved growth hormones, the same hormones that have been rejected in Europe, that should bear the blame? Why is eating less meat associated with a lower incidence of many types of cancer? Could it be chemical overload? American women are about five times more likely to develop breast cancer than are women in less developed countries.


Triangulating The Future Of Reinvention: Three Emerging Models Of Environmental Protection, Daniel A. Farber Jan 2000

Triangulating The Future Of Reinvention: Three Emerging Models Of Environmental Protection, Daniel A. Farber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Environmental Justice And Natural Areas Protection Trends & Insight, Michael B. Gerrard Jan 2000

Environmental Justice And Natural Areas Protection Trends & Insight, Michael B. Gerrard

Faculty Scholarship

There are 3,119,963 square miles in the continental United States. That sounds like plenty of space to put just about anything. However, when the facility seeking a home is environmentally controversial, finding even one square mile can seem almost impossible.

This country is now in its third major era in making siting decisions. The first era – unconstrained siting – lasted until the late 1960s. Then began the second era – protecting natural areas. In the early 1990s, we embarked upon a third era – environmental justice. The growing tensions between protecting natural areas and achieving environmental justice suggest that we should ...


Trends In The Supply And Demand For Environmental Lawyers, Michael B. Gerrard Jan 2000

Trends In The Supply And Demand For Environmental Lawyers, Michael B. Gerrard

Faculty Scholarship

The boom times for environmental lawyers were the late 1980s and the early 1990s. The June 1990 issue of Money magazine called environmental law a "fast-track career." Two or three years of experience with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a state environmental agency, the environmental units of the Justice Department, or a state attorney general's office were a ticket to a high-paying job in the private sector. Law students were clamoring to enter the field and law firms were scrambling to find experienced environmental lawyers, or to recycle newly underemployed antitrust lawyers into this burgeoning field.


Instream Flows In New Mexico, Denise D. Fort Jan 2000

Instream Flows In New Mexico, Denise D. Fort

Faculty Scholarship

Instream flows for fisheries, recreation and aesthetic purposes held to be a legitimate use under New Mexico's statutory regime.


Can’T Get No Satisfaction: Securing Water For Federal And Tribal Lands In The West, Reed D. Benson Jan 2000

Can’T Get No Satisfaction: Securing Water For Federal And Tribal Lands In The West, Reed D. Benson

Faculty Scholarship

In recent years, the western states have often struggled with the federal government over control and management of natural resources, particularly water. For its part, federal law defers to states in many matters of water resource allocation.


Alden And The Web Of Environmental Law, William D. Araiza Jan 2000

Alden And The Web Of Environmental Law, William D. Araiza

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Corruption Of Civic Environmentalism, Rena I. Steinzor Jan 2000

The Corruption Of Civic Environmentalism, Rena I. Steinzor

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Devolution And The Public Health, Rena I. Steinzor Jan 2000

Devolution And The Public Health, Rena I. Steinzor

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Variable Justice: Environmental Standards, Contaminated Fish, And "Acceptable” Risk To Native Peoples, Catherine O'Neill Jan 2000

Variable Justice: Environmental Standards, Contaminated Fish, And "Acceptable” Risk To Native Peoples, Catherine O'Neill

Faculty Scholarship

This article begins with the observation that “[f]ish, especially salmon, are necessary for the survival of the Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest, both as individuals and as a people.” It considers conventional approaches to regulating contamination of the waters that support the fish on which these peoples depend, and finds that the narrow focus on human physical health fails fully to comprehend the multiple dimensions of the harm to these fishing peoples. Importantly, this focus fails to appreciate the cultural dimensions of the harm. The article examines health and environmental agencies’ standard-setting practices and challenges their failure to ...


Restoration Affecting Native Resources: The Place Of Native Ecological Science, Catherine O'Neill Jan 2000

Restoration Affecting Native Resources: The Place Of Native Ecological Science, Catherine O'Neill

Faculty Scholarship

This article begins by noting that non-Native society—the dominant society in the United States—has often discounted Native expertise and denied a place for Native environmental managers. Part II catalogues the various forms that denigration and denial of Native ecological science have taken. Part III marks the historical antecedents of such efforts to deny Native knowledge and to downplay the role of Native peoples as environmental managers. It then identifies particular features of the approaches favored by non-Native environmental managers that likely work to exclude, devalue, or discriminate against Native science, with the intention of encouraging further work to ...